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Forum topic by Arthouse posted 324 days ago 986 views 0 times favorited 27 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Arthouse

226 posts in 1275 days


324 days ago

I am looking for someone who can cut out human faces or heads out of wood for a project. Please let me know if anyone is interested in cutting out several heads who has done this before.

-- "The hand is the cutting edge of the mind but the wind and sun are the healing factors of the heart


27 replies so far

View mrjinx007's profile

mrjinx007

1353 posts in 392 days


#1 posted 322 days ago

Hi, O.K. what do you mean? Human faces with eyes, ears, nose; i.e., carvings or face shapes cut out of plywood. What size? what kind of wood. What are they going to be used for, etc, etc, etc,

-- earthartandfoods.com

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DS

2131 posts in 1045 days


#2 posted 322 days ago

Well, just by way of information, to carve 3D objects with a CNC router, it takes more than the typical 3-axis CNC machine. Most people don’t realize that a majority of 3-axis machines can only process 2 1/2 D objects.

It’s this thing called interpolation. (Moving more than one axis at a time to form the desired geometry)
Think of an etch-a-sketch. To draw straight lines is simple. To draw a curved line, you need to “interpolate” the two directions, moving them the appropriate amount simultaneously to accurately create the curved line.

To do this in more than two simultaneous axis’ at a time requires a special controller and special (read expensive) software. Some “canned cycles” on some controllers can do limited 3D moves, but by in large it is un-necessary for most CNC work.

What you are looking for is someone with a 4-axis, or 5-axis machine with some advanced software.
This is far less common than the 3-axis fare used to make most cabinetry and furniture parts.

Hope this helps some.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

3684 posts in 1992 days


#3 posted 322 days ago

This is a video of CNC that can do it a VERY expensive 5 axis CNC!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View Joe Lyddon's profile (online now)

Joe Lyddon

7675 posts in 2677 days


#4 posted 322 days ago

oldnovice

That is a beautiful CNC machine… Yep, a 3D CNC…

Should be able to make a Head or Bust on it… Sculpturing would be a piece of cake!

Now, we need to be able to develop the Program for the CNC machine to do it!
The development system is probably as much as the CNC machine!
You would really need to be able to run it through a Simulator to be sure it works rather than messing up so much wood, metal, etc. Just the Simulator would be a huge cost!
... in my imagination… One huge programming task…

Take a picture and convert it into the program required to carve it… Like a Head for a Bust….

I see nothing but $$$$$$$$$$$$ and TIME!

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View Moron's profile

Moron

4666 posts in 2518 days


#5 posted 322 days ago

what DS said

unless you have a friend who owns a 4 axis CNC

your pissing in the wind

call a local community college, you might get lucky

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

774 posts in 941 days


#6 posted 322 days ago

Someone with minimal carving skills can use a 3-axis CNC to do human heads. Some software allows for indexed operations so a part can be rotated between machining operations. A little cleanup work would be needed at the top and bottom and that’s where the carving skills would be needed.

I plan to do a project like this myself within the next year and would be interested in this one too except I’m already over-loaded with work for the next few months.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

View sras's profile

sras

3813 posts in 1754 days


#7 posted 322 days ago

I think these answers change if you focus on a face rather than an entire head. Your request presented either option – I’m pretty sure a relief of a face could be done on a 3-axis…

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

3684 posts in 1992 days


#8 posted 321 days ago

My son, a certified CNC machinist, did manage to make a 3D carving of a BMW 911 about 4” long on my Shopbot Buddy, not a 4 or 5 axis machine by any means!

I did not watch the entire process but he started cutting at the top then the two sides …. etc! For an experiment it turned out pretty good. I guess he was the “indexer” in this case!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View DS's profile

DS

2131 posts in 1045 days


#9 posted 321 days ago

There is a technique called “rastering” where a small bit is stepped in very small increments from one end to another and the profile is cut a line at a time.
This is still 2 1/2 D as the one axis doesn’t move while the other two do. This creates a bit of a rougher cut that has to be touched up, but it isn’t entirely unfeasible.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View Joe Lyddon's profile (online now)

Joe Lyddon

7675 posts in 2677 days


#10 posted 318 days ago

oldnovice

That sounds like an interesting unique way of accomplishing the unusual.

I was thinking…(really!)... Google and their SKETCHUP… if they could interface that software to a CNC interface(able to handle the axises problem), that might save a TON of money in development!

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

774 posts in 941 days


#11 posted 318 days ago

Sketchup does indirectly interface with CNC. I’m modeling objects in that software then exporting stl and dxf files for importing into my CAM software.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

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oldnovice

3684 posts in 1992 days


#12 posted 317 days ago

JAAune what do use use for your modeling for CNC? I use Creo Elements Direct as it creates 2D PDF prints that I can use with my CNC.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View PineChopper's profile

PineChopper

175 posts in 821 days


#13 posted 317 days ago

https://store.carvewright.com/offers.php?mode=offer&offerid=65

Carve Wright has what seems to be an awesome machine. My friend told me about it. He’s made some really nice molding. If my business ever expands in that direction, I’ll consider one too.

carvewright.com or the above website is this months special.
Hope this helps you.

View Ripthorn's profile

Ripthorn

746 posts in 1610 days


#14 posted 317 days ago

I’ve got a little 4 axis CNC mill, but haven’t actually used the 4th axis yet. But in order to really do what you are wanting, either indexed (probably 12 positions for best result) or a 4th axis are needed. The machine isn’t really the problem, it’s getting the CAM program to accurately produce the G code necessary to do all the operations. I have been learning that there is a lot more to running a CNC than drawing a part in CAD. The CAM process requires quite a bit of knowledge and foresight in order to get a program out that will actually produce the result you want.

For anyone interested, the LinuxCNC package is free and works pretty well, mine is running in 4 axis mode, though I just don’t use the A axis currently.

-- Brian T. - Exact science is not an exact science

View DS's profile

DS

2131 posts in 1045 days


#15 posted 317 days ago

I was impressed with the Carvewright software utilities and many of the features. (e.g. Digitizing probe)

Where the Carvewright loses me is that it seems to be a lightweight hobby machine that might not hold up under continuous production runs. It more resembles an Inkjet Plotter than a CNC machine.

I wish I had some of those features on a larger, more industrial machine.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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