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How to sand these Cabriolet legs uniformly?

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Forum topic by distrbd posted 304 days ago 691 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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distrbd

1015 posts in 1051 days


304 days ago

This is my second attempt at making cabriolet legs,the first ones were not as smooth as I would have liked but these recent ones are all cut uniformly (well almost!),my problem is, sanding is evenly and equally. I tend to remove a bit too much off one leg,then try to match the other three with the first one and before you know it ,I will have removed too much off all of them.
What is the best approach sanding these curvy legs so they all look and feel the same?the tools I have :oscillating sander, Disk sander,Belt sander,hand files,spokeshave,sandpapers .scrapers.


-- Ken from Ontario


11 replies so far

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Loren

7273 posts in 2252 days


#1 posted 304 days ago

I might try mounting them on the bench all together so they stick
out with room to work on each. Then have at them with rasps,
files and scrapers. Get yourself some Iwasaki files if you can bear
to wait for them to come – they are marvelous.

I never shape more than a feather touch with a sander because it
tends to make mush. Some people can really work magic
shaping curved work with a sander I am sure, but the skill
is not easily won. With heavy sanding the creases and edges
than make for crisp geometry and effective shadows get
wrecked easily.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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hobby1

275 posts in 902 days


#2 posted 304 days ago

The way I do it, I round over one area of each leg at a time, for example, I’ll roundover the front part from the knee area to the foot, of each leg, then when all 4 are finished to that point, I’ll take the next area to round over, and do each leg the same way, that way it helps me keep some consistancy with all 4 legs, by the time there done they are pretty close to being similar, because there done by hand, with a grinder, files and sanders, I always have some variation from one to the other, but by doing each one one area at a time with all 4 simultaneously seems to make it work out in being more consistant in forming all 4 legs together.

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distrbd

1015 posts in 1051 days


#3 posted 304 days ago

hobby1,sanding one area on all 4 at a time ,makes sense,that’s how I thought I should approach it.
Loren,I have a half round file but it’s not an Iwasaki,LV sells all different types of them which one/ones would you use for this project?A and C ?

-- Ken from Ontario

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Loren

7273 posts in 2252 days


#4 posted 304 days ago

The basic straight one in the coarsest cut is the best value –
it is not expensive and has teeth on both sides. The combination
of speed and quality of cut is amazing, better than the flat
back of a hand cut patternmaker’s rasp, like a Nicholson no. 50.

In terms of the curved ones, they are not as useful as
you’d think and they have teeth on one side only. They
are only useful on inside curves and because they are not
tapered like a regular rasp or file, they have a different
operational geometry. I have the coarse curved one and
use it seldom but I have 2 of the flat ones and think they
are really great. The fine ones are only 3/8” wide or something
so you can imagine how well that might work on a shallow
inside curve. The teeth are more than 1/16” deep so
when you consider draw-filing in a hollow curve, the teeth
are still pretty engaged at the edges.

You can look at the inside curves you want and make a pine
block to wrap sandpaper around to get them shaped the
same.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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distrbd

1015 posts in 1051 days


#5 posted 304 days ago

Here’s Charles Neil talking about them ,they look amazing.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8fCuLLyOqFA

-- Ken from Ontario

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Loren

7273 posts in 2252 days


#6 posted 304 days ago

I have D, E and B. I think.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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distrbd

1015 posts in 1051 days


#7 posted 304 days ago

Thank you Loren,I definitely will have to get one ,the flat ,straight one at least.

-- Ken from Ontario

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a1Jim

112001 posts in 2181 days


#8 posted 304 days ago

The Cabriolet legs I’ve done I found for shaping and construction sanding an oscillating spindle sander works great(a hand held one is even better),plus a pattern makers file,a good spoke shave and even a random orbital sander,plus a few other toys.
http://lumberjocks.com/a1Jim/blog/15735

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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ZacD

34 posts in 364 days


#9 posted 304 days ago

You could possibly use crayon or chalk and just mark the area you think should be removed and successively shrink it. This would at least allow you to visualize how and where you should remove material. Obviously not a quick method because one or two passes with a file or rasp and you’re going to have to recolor the area.

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AlaskaGuy

568 posts in 913 days


#10 posted 304 days ago

Do worry about every leg being identical. Once the project is assembled you won’t see any difference in the legs.

Here’s my blog on how I do it.
http://lumberjocks.com/AlaskaGuy/blog/28180

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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distrbd

1015 posts in 1051 days


#11 posted 304 days ago

Thank you all for your comments,I will try to use use hand tools like files,spokeshave,just to see if they get me the uniformity I’m looking for.
Alaskaguy,I don’t think I’ll ever get them to be identical,just don’t want them to look noticeably different.

Zac,the chalk idea is a good one,I’ll try it.

a1Jim,I wouldn’t hesitate to use the oscillating sander if I had your level of experience but as Loren mentioned things can get ugly quickly lol.I’ll try it again but this time I’ll need to be patient and focussed.

-- Ken from Ontario

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