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Vintage rabbeting planes - Sargent 507 vs Stanley 140 - which is better for my needs?

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Forum topic by shaver posted 09-28-2013 10:06 PM 1870 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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shaver

37 posts in 424 days


09-28-2013 10:06 PM

Topic tags/keywords: sargent 507 stanley 140 rabbeting plane

Very recently, I picked up a Stanley 140 for around $60, and a Sargent 507 for around $100. (I spent more than I wanted for the Sargent) – I plan to clean them both up, tune, sharpen and then sell one.

I received the Stanley 140, but still waiting for the Sargent 507 to be shipped. Once I get them both, I’ll post pics of their conditions.

I’m very new to woodworking, and interested in building mission style furniture – which as you know, employs a lot of mortise and tenon joinery. I’m still saving for a LV large shoulder plane, but saw these rabbeting planes and jumped.

Any opinions on which may be better for what I’m looking to do? Has anyone used both?

As I mentioned, once I get the Sargent, I’ll post pics of both of them.

Thanks!


9 replies so far

View JustJoe's profile

JustJoe

1554 posts in 734 days


#1 posted 09-28-2013 10:26 PM

Neither is a true rabbeting plane. They are both block planes with added on features that enable them to be used as such in a pinch.

The Sargent is similar to the LN rabbeting block plane with the open sides. It will be more fragile than the #140.

The #140 has a skewed cutter which makes it easier on cross-grain. To make it like a rabbet plane you take the side off and hope you don’t lose it (I did once, tore half the shop apart before I found it buried on the bench.)

Neither is really the plane for tenon cheeks or shoulders although either can be used to clean up saw marks once you’ve cut them out. I’d choose the #140 over the Sargent just because of the skewed iron and the beefier construction.

The Stanley 92 is good for cleaning shoulders, and there are similar planes by other makers if you find a decent older one that was made with care. I prefer the 98/99 for shoulders. They’re made for widening dadoes but they do the job just as well on shoulders.

The Stanley #10 (or 10-1/2, 10-1/4) is an open-sided smoothing plane that is made for taking a bit off the cheeks. It’s got the same weak link as the Sargent 507 but it’s bigger. I’ve only managed to break one so far.

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Randy_ATX

683 posts in 1138 days


#2 posted 09-28-2013 10:47 PM

D@mn Joe, you know your stuff. Impressive.

-- Randy -- Austin, TX by way of Northwest (Woodville), OH

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shaver

37 posts in 424 days


#3 posted 09-29-2013 10:10 PM

You had me take another look at the 98/99, Joe.. unfortunately they’re very much out of my price range; along with the Stanley # 10.

I suppose I could try and make a number 10 from a number 4 like this guy demonstrates – but it looks like a ton of work, and it’s a bit of a hack job – still, has me thinking :)

(Skip to 4:27)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=DiTwEeFgAIg#t=266

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shaver

37 posts in 424 days


#4 posted 09-29-2013 10:12 PM

.

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JustJoe

1554 posts in 734 days


#5 posted 09-29-2013 10:55 PM

Yes it seems like metal plane prices are a bit out of whack, but when enough people are willing to spend $40 or more on an incomplete or broken #5 jack plane (approximately 17 trillion made) then there is no incentive for the fleabay sellers to offer the decent stuff at anything less than three figures.

Another much more affordable option is a wooden rabbet plane. Just look for the widest one you can find with a skewed iron. They are usually cheap because sellers don’t know what they are supposed to do, and they look like the simplest of planes – just a rectangular piece of wood with an iron. When you get it, spend some time making one side perfectly square to the sole, regrind the iron if need be. You’ll have a plane that can clean all parts of a tenon.

I think the guy who listed this one knows it's for rabbets, that’s why he’s asking twice the going price.

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69BBNova

338 posts in 912 days


#6 posted 09-29-2013 10:55 PM

The 98/99 is a bit out of my price range currently so I picked up a Stanley No. 79…

I had it for months, then one day figuring out the prototype recipe folder I realized I could use it to open up the groove on the back spine…

I knew it would come in handy, but yes I still want (need?) the others…

I’m right on the edge looking for a Stanley No. 92 also, I could of used one here and there.

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shaver

37 posts in 424 days


#7 posted 10-03-2013 12:39 AM

Okie, promised pics -

First the Stanley #140 – pre-clean/sharpen:









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shaver

37 posts in 424 days


#8 posted 10-03-2013 12:46 AM

Sargent 507 pre-clean/sharpen:







Blade:


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shaver

37 posts in 424 days


#9 posted 10-07-2013 12:32 AM

Wish I had some better pics, but here is the Sargent 507 cleaned up:

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