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Biscuit jointer ??

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Forum topic by Belg1960 posted 212 days ago 673 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Belg1960

735 posts in 1570 days


212 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: question joining

Guys, I’m having no luck using my biscuit cutter to cut two different angles on the ends. The joint is 110 degrees on one side and 79 degrees on the other. I keeping getting the cuts in the wrong place. How do I set my joiner correctly to make these cuts? Also does it matter from which side the cut is made? I’m referencing both cuts off the outside face.

-- ***Pat*** Rookie woodworker looking for an education!!!


11 replies so far

View BArnold's profile

BArnold

166 posts in 337 days


#1 posted 212 days ago

The photo you posted looks like a 90° angle made with two 45° cuts. No problem making biscuit slots on that kind of miter. Can you clarify your issue with a different photo?

-- Bill, Thomasville, GA

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

2691 posts in 992 days


#2 posted 212 days ago

79 + 110 would make 189°? How is that working out for ya?

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

1486 posts in 998 days


#3 posted 212 days ago

Does your biscuit jointer fence have a 135º setting (not all of them do)? The fence will look like it’s pointing at the floor. That’s what you need, then your reference to the outside face. That does look like a 90º joint, how did you get the 79 1nd 110º angles you mentioned.

-- I long for the days when Coke was a cola, and a joint was a bad place to be (Merle Haggard)

View Belg1960's profile

Belg1960

735 posts in 1570 days


#4 posted 212 days ago

Ok I got some more info and pics to explain.
The highlighted joint is what I’m reproducing for a Halloween version

This is how the joint lines up with my try
just a mock up of the joint

-- ***Pat*** Rookie woodworker looking for an education!!!

View Belg1960's profile

Belg1960

735 posts in 1570 days


#5 posted 212 days ago

I just used that pic to describe the type of joining I was trying to accomplish.
First post edited

-- ***Pat*** Rookie woodworker looking for an education!!!

View Belg1960's profile

Belg1960

735 posts in 1570 days


#6 posted 212 days ago

My references of the angles were how they were cut from 90 degrees. 11 Degrees shy of 90, and 20 degrees over 90 on second piece. Plz let me know how to state this more accurately for future projects. Thanks Notice the end tagline on my posts,LOL

-- ***Pat*** Rookie woodworker looking for an education!!!

View Loren's profile

Loren

6774 posts in 2153 days


#7 posted 212 days ago

The more acute joint will have more surface area. Shifting the error
to the outside, you can plane off the excess wood after assembly
without much trouble. If you make both angles the same the
surface areas will match up. So, if you want a 45 degree joint,
cut each part to 22.5 degrees.

You can only rely on the joiner fence to accurately index both
parts to the same biscuit depth if the angles are the same. It’s
a pivot point issue I think. You can analyze the error and
stick a shim under the jointer fence for one of the cuts
too, if you want to. That would be another way to solve
the problem on the outside, but you’d be shifting the thing
that’s bugging you to the inside of the joint, which is often
unacceptable as well.

View Belg1960's profile

Belg1960

735 posts in 1570 days


#8 posted 212 days ago

Loren your saying my problem lies in the way I cut the two angles? If I would have split the difference between the 20 and 11 and made each 15.5 the cut would have wound up in the same place?

-- ***Pat*** Rookie woodworker looking for an education!!!

View SamuraiSaw's profile

SamuraiSaw

405 posts in 469 days


#9 posted 212 days ago

As loren pointed out, different angle cuts result in disparate bevel face sizes. Determining the angle, dividing it in half, and cutting the miter the same on both pieces is the correct way. That would also eliminate the issue with the plate joiner.

If you’re stuck with what you’ve got, the plate joiner can be made to work but it will be a little trickier. Draw a reference line across the face of each cut and manually align the joiner face.

-- Friends don't let friends use right tilt contractor saws......

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

2691 posts in 992 days


#10 posted 212 days ago

Like the others said, when cutting angles, what you have to do on one side must be done on the other side in order for the edges to be equal.
Visualize it this way:
If you have a 4 sided box, each miter will be 45°
45+45+45+45 = 180°x2 =360
If you have an 8 sided box, each miter will be 22.5°
22.5+22.5+22.5+22.5+22.5+22.5+22.5+22.5 = 180°x2 =360
a 6 sided box would be 30°
A 10 sided box would be 18°
and so on.
Every miter must be divided into 360° in order for it to make an equal sided box.

(EDIT OOPS! MY THNKING WAS A BIT OFF< I PLEAD NOT BEING FULLY AWAKE AFTER MY NAP!)

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

1104 posts in 801 days


#11 posted 212 days ago

Your first picture looks like you used some L brackets bent outward in the bottom corners. Is that correct? Anyway, you need to put an angle finder against the outside of each assembled corner, then hold that up to a protractor – THEN divide by 2. That’s how each leg of your corner should be cut. But it’s a Halloween decoration – don’‘t obsess for now and just use some angle or screws or whatever get’s you through the project. In the future remember that all the corners add up to 360 degrees and each angle is comprised of two equal parts. A protractor from staples or the art supply store will be your friend in this instance.

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