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Forum topic by MikeinSC posted 339 days ago 841 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MikeinSC

58 posts in 620 days


339 days ago

About a year ago I found a writeup that listed types of wood and finishes that are best suited for that type. For example, some woods that are considered oily should not have Product X applied. And specifically, I am working with some Live Oak and want a natural feel to it, not a plasticy coating.

I know this has been covered a million times over and I have searched but I am still lost.

Thanks,
Mike

-- I am what they call a "rookie".


12 replies so far

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15688 posts in 2850 days


#1 posted 339 days ago

Trial and error with samples is the best bet.

A simple rule of thumb is that oil will darken wood, oil-based poly will give it a warmer, yellowish tint, and water-based poly will give the clearest finish.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

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MikeinSC

58 posts in 620 days


#2 posted 339 days ago

Thank you Charlie. That rule will get me started in the right direction.

-- I am what they call a "rookie".

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

10736 posts in 1322 days


#3 posted 339 days ago

I have used shellac and lacquer (not together) on live oak boxes and liked the finish. Some live oak has REALLY open/large pores. I have used Timbermate red oak grain filler on live oak. I like the look but you should test on scrap as there is quite a bit of contrast between the wood and the filler.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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Finisherman

195 posts in 481 days


#4 posted 337 days ago

As a rule, any finish can be used on any type of wood. The oily woods like teak and rosewood can cause problems in finishing when using lacquer, waterborne or varnish. When finishing oily woods, seal them with either vinyl sealer or dewaxed shellac. Prior to sealing, wash the wood with acetone, lacquer thinner or naphtha to remove the surface oil.

View MarkSr's profile

MarkSr

215 posts in 682 days


#5 posted 337 days ago

Okay Finisherman, I am mister cheap, my wood working bench is made from recycled plallet lumber, except for the top 1/4” laminated Oak plywood and 3/4” x 4” Oak for the skirt and the chocks for the two vices.

My top was made from 27 pieces of Yellow & White Pine, Ash, Poplur & a couple of White Oak glued together and as I said skirted with 3/4” Red Oak. which has not been installed yet. The base is made of treated 4×4’s, the bottom foot base, legs, and both short and long streachers. The three sides are yellow & white pine & poplur milled to 3/8’s and glued up to make the sides and back. I took the raunchiest piece of 3/4 plywood and milled that to make my draw fronts, the bottom and sides where made the same as the table sides and back.

I would like to spray a sealer and finish on it seeing that it’s probably 75% complete. I have been reading about spray guns and sealers and finishes but mostly advertising material.

I would really like to get an answer from a qualified, tried and true person of experience to tell me what type of gun to buy, whose sealer to use and whose finish to use. Basicly teach a full rookie on how to finish a wook bench. I have a Craftsman 2-1/2 HP, 16 gal. 125psi compressor and 25 ft. of Porta Cable 3/8” hose.

I would like to keep the top, skirt, and the three sides, along with the frame for the drawers a natural red oak color and the vice chocks, base frame and drawers just a little bit darker for contrast.

Any words of wisdow would be greatly appreciated and if you have a favorite webbsite that you think might help that would be great too.

As Always,
Mark

-- Mark, ”...NEWBEE: On the road to learning a lot; but; a lot more to learn…” ("My Granddad used to tell me, if you didn't learn something new today, it just wasn't worth getting out of bed")

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Finisherman

195 posts in 481 days


#6 posted 336 days ago

First of all, I would direct you to Charles Neil. He is a master finisher with years of experience in the trade and I’d defer to his advice as a matter of course. Charles offers an online finishing course which you would likely find helpful. To get the slightly darker colour that you’re after, apply a light coat of dewaxed amber shellac. Next, apply several coats of either CAB lacquer or a waterborne finish to your entire project. Sherwin Williams and Mohawk make high quality finishes.

As for what type of gun would be best for you, I’d suggest a conversion type HVLP gun. Devilbiss and Apollo are reputed to produce good quality spray guns. An HVLP gun produces a fine finish with much less overspray than a conventional spray gun would produce, although your compressor might be a little bit too small to meet the air demands of a conversion type HVLP gun.

View MarkSr's profile

MarkSr

215 posts in 682 days


#7 posted 335 days ago

Thanks Finisherman, for all the info.

I have another question if you don’t mind, what is a conversion type HVLP gun, compared to a regular HVLP gun?

-- Mark, ”...NEWBEE: On the road to learning a lot; but; a lot more to learn…” ("My Granddad used to tell me, if you didn't learn something new today, it just wasn't worth getting out of bed")

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Finisherman

195 posts in 481 days


#8 posted 335 days ago

Briefly, a conversion HVLP gun gets its air from an air compressor, whereas a conventional HVLP gun is supplied with air by a turbine. A conversion type gun allows you to spray a wider range of finishes at different viscosities, simply by increasing or decreasing the air flow. The capabilities of a turbine based HVLP system are somewhat limited according to the size and power of the turbine. Incidentally, Conversion HVLP guns are called such because they include a device which converts high pressure air to low pressure air.

View MarkSr's profile

MarkSr

215 posts in 682 days


#9 posted 334 days ago

Got it, thanks again, a lot of help as usual.

As always
Mark

-- Mark, ”...NEWBEE: On the road to learning a lot; but; a lot more to learn…” ("My Granddad used to tell me, if you didn't learn something new today, it just wasn't worth getting out of bed")

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

996 posts in 766 days


#10 posted 334 days ago

I am not an expert but would not use lacquer, shellac, varnish or poly film finish on top of your workbench. I would be tempted to use oil varnish blends like Watco Danish Oil, Minwax Tung or Antique Oils for the top. If do not like the smell of these products go straight to pure Tung oil. Makes clean up & re-applications much easier, as dings & dents accumulate.

A film finish for sides and draws might be okay to retain colors, but not the top.

If actually true and birds call you by name, cheap, cheap, cheap, every morning might take a look at what Harbor Freight has for spray equipment. Found product owner’s review pretty much on the money.

Only because pay attention find the birds know my name too!

-- Bill

View MarkSr's profile

MarkSr

215 posts in 682 days


#11 posted 332 days ago

Thanks Bill, just read your post, so I haven’t reaserched anything about Danish Oil, Tung or Antique Oils. How does the oil application go on? Can an oil finish be sprayed with an HVLP gun or the old fashion way, brush or cloth? This will be my first finishing project on my first big shop built project. Which application would you use to finish your bench top? Just to let you know, after I put the 27 pieces of soft wood together, (glued up 3 individual sections, then glued up all three together, I think I counted 18 3/4” pipe clamps and left them over night.) One of my major screw-ups was, not checking out other benches more closely, or I would have found out you don’t start the drawers at the top of the bottom of the long streachers. It doesn’t leave you room to slide a clamp under the table top. So all my clamps where placed on the top but I had enough clamps and they came out very tight. I stold “The Wood Wisperer way of flattening a bench top with a shop built router sled. I followed his video to a tee and made the sled and the top came out as flat as can be. Then I installed a 1/4” Red Oak Plywood on top of the flattened out boards, lots of glue and weight and clamps and left it that way for two days, the laminate is not moving or going anywhere soon. As I have said to Finisherman I would like the top and the drawer fronts have a light color and the three side panels to match the top and drawer fronts. The draw frame, the bench frame (all 4×4’s), the table skirt and the vice chucks to be a darker color ot add a little of my own touches.

I am now installing the skirt, then I have to make my vice chucks and I am installing a electrical socket strip on the end panel to eliminate extension cords. I use a cane when outside walking but in the shop it’s not needed, usually I have something to grab to stop the fall.

Anyway, anything and I really mean anything that you think I should know prior to screwing up my bench I would very much apppreciate. You have no idea how many mistakes I have made and how long it took me to make them right.
But I am learning, so far I haven’t made the same mistake twice, so I guess I am ahead, for now.

Thanks for the advice and I look for anything else you would like me to consider before I fix another mistake.

As always,
Mark

-- Mark, ”...NEWBEE: On the road to learning a lot; but; a lot more to learn…” ("My Granddad used to tell me, if you didn't learn something new today, it just wasn't worth getting out of bed")

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

996 posts in 766 days


#12 posted 332 days ago

Mark, have only built four workbenches. Three wood working benches two of which did not apply any finishing products at all. Third, one applied Watco Danish Natural Oil to every part of the bench. Fourth workbench used in a sewing room applied Waterlox original sealer finish to everything.

Only problem with Watco product was drying time took longer than expected. Wiped on, wait 10-15 minutes wiped off but took more than a day to dry, only applied two coats. Many people will apply a top coat over Watco products to maintain and protect the wood better. Guy wanted an easy to repair finish, and did not want to use BLO. Seven years lathe top has dings, dents, and drill holes and guy has not done anything with it.

Waterlox more expensive but easy to brush on and still has nice sheen five years later. Yes, showing some wear in spots but not ready for another coat or two.

Only reason recommending any oil varnish blend for bench top is reparability. I would either brush or wipe on.

People making a living finishing or people more experience than I have probably can spray any oil varnish blend, oil base or waterborne finish there is. I am still trying adjust, my compressor air pressure and spray gun to lay down a decent coat of waterborne poly.

-- Bill

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