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Need a planer, what should I get?

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Forum topic by EggMan posted 09-21-2013 10:18 PM 918 views 0 times favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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EggMan

33 posts in 465 days


09-21-2013 10:18 PM

I am at the point where I need a planer. I have been watching local CL for a while but there is not much in my area.

I have a small shop and will need to haul the planer outside when I use it. But I’m a strapping young (enough) guy, so transportable, but not too light.

I have been looking for something like the DW 734, as it seems to be in my price range, and (correct/comment if you wish) dewalt makes pretty good stuff.

So, what would you guys do if you were in my shoes? Buy new at big box? Keep looking at CL? Buy re-furb on eBay?

And what about blade life, and new blade replacement price and availability?

Thanks all
Ryan.


22 replies so far

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Shawn Masterson

1262 posts in 639 days


#1 posted 09-21-2013 10:25 PM

I have to start by saying I don’t like lunch box machines. That being said for $400 If you are patient you could find a stationary 15” planer. I was wondering why would you need to drag it outside? I understand having a small space. You really need to state what small is to you. I would choose the 735 over the 734.

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Shawn Masterson

1262 posts in 639 days


#2 posted 09-21-2013 10:47 PM

I have to start by saying I don’t like lunch box machines. That being said for $400 If you are patient you could find a stationary 15” planer. I was wondering why would you need to drag it outside? I understand having a small space. You really need to state what small is to you. I would choose the 735 over the 734.

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bullhead1

228 posts in 939 days


#3 posted 09-21-2013 10:55 PM

I have the dewalt 735 and am happy with it. If your not planing a lot of material, I think its the best choice. If you go with one of the larger planers you will probably have to have a 220v outlet and a long enough cord to move it outside along with a longer cord and a 220 cord which would be an added expense.

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NiteWalker

2710 posts in 1267 days


#4 posted 09-21-2013 11:20 PM

I have the 734 and love it. I’ve had it for a couple of months now and it’s gotten a workout.
That’s the one I’d go for. The 735 isn’t worth $200+ more than the 734 IMHO. The 734 can be adjusted for no snipe, cuts very cleanly and should you decide to down the line, byrd makes a shelix head for it.

-- He who dies with the most tools... dies with the emptiest wallet.

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Loren

7739 posts in 2338 days


#5 posted 09-22-2013 12:47 AM

I had a DW733 with thick HSS steel blades and they cut acceptably
for a long time. The reversable disposal knives have their benefits,
but keep in mind they are definitely money makers for the
manufacturers, like printer ink cartidges but I’m sure nowhere
near as profitable.

I like 220v stationary planers too myself, but I’ll admit the
portable planers can work pretty well. They heavier the
planer, in general, the better it will process wood – so a
80lb portable will outperform a 50lb one, if you don’t
mind the lifting.

Stationary planers are generally in the 300# and up range
and have a lot of cast iron in them and big induction
motors that run quieter. If you work at night, a
portable planer may annoy your neighbors more
since the sound carries.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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JustJoe

1554 posts in 729 days


#6 posted 09-22-2013 02:05 AM

Well as long as you’re young and strong enough to drag it outside, you might as well go for the gold.

That would be a shiny gold-colored powermatic 209.

Or you could step up to a real planer. Might need to make a little rolling stand for this one though.

-- This Ad Space For Sale! Your Ad Here! Reach a targeted audience! Affordable Rates, easy financing! Contact an ad represenative today at JustJoe's Advertising Consortium.

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firefighterontheside

4901 posts in 547 days


#7 posted 09-22-2013 03:20 AM

I have a 733 and it’s been great for 13 years. I like it because I can have the knives sharpened. I have had the same 3 sets for the whole time. I’m leery of the 734 and the disposable knives. That just seems dumb to me. Like Loren said, it’s a money maker. I’m sure the 734 is just as good or better than my 733 with its 3 knives compared to my 2. Maybe you’ll find that the knives last long enough due to being harder steel and double sided that it doesn’t matter that you have to discard them. If you’re having to pick the thing up and carry it, I wouldn’t get anything bigger than the 734. It’s heavy enough. As I get older, it seems heavier. The 735 must have 50 lbs on it.

-- Bill M. I love my job as a firefighter, but nothing gives me the satisfaction of running my hand over a project that I have built and just finished sanding.

View LakeLover's profile

LakeLover

275 posts in 630 days


#8 posted 09-22-2013 11:11 AM

I have the 734. Ran thousands of feet through it. If you watch what you put thru it the blades last fairly well.

I bought it when it first came out 1998? I am on my 4 set of blades. I keep one old set for trash wood and have taken a diamond hone after it.

Good thing your young and strong as it is a gut buster to move. The handles seem to be the right hieght to wack my knees. So I made a stand for it.

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LakeLover

275 posts in 630 days


#9 posted 09-22-2013 11:16 AM

I have the 734. Ran thousands of feet through it. If you watch what you put thru it the blades last fairly well.

I bought it when it first came out 1998? I am on my 4 set of blades. I keep one old set for trash wood and have taken a diamond hone after it.

Good thing your young and strong as it is a gut buster to move. The handles seem to be the right hieght to wack my knees. So I made a stand for it.

View ScrubPlane's profile

ScrubPlane

187 posts in 886 days


#10 posted 09-22-2013 01:45 PM

I’d ‘size’ the tool correctly to the projected work load. Even a small stationary planer machine takes up a sizeable shop ‘footprint’ relative to the machine itself as well as the requisite working space. Unless you plan on rebuilding every kitchen cabinet from scratch and need to plane significant amounts of wood on a regular basis then I’d stick with the smaller unit, either the DeWalt or Rigid.

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lumbermeister

100 posts in 670 days


#11 posted 09-22-2013 03:31 PM

Ditto re. the positive comments on the 734 – working great for me after a year ownership, many hard woods passed through it (domestic and exotic), and original blades.

FWIW, I am not sure of the advantages of the 735. The faster finishing speed sound good, but, in my experience, all blades quickly develop small nicks in the cutting edge. This would mean that, even at the higher finishing speed, wood planed the higher speed will likely require sanding (am I missing something?). For those of us who have relatively decent dust collection, the 735’s impeller, too, may be only of small advantage (as is the additional 1/2” planing width).

View EggMan's profile

EggMan

33 posts in 465 days


#12 posted 09-22-2013 04:33 PM

Thanks for all the input.

On a planer like the 734 lets say, how short of a piece can it handle? There has to a minimum length that it can feed thru. Or am I not right about that.

And typically how thin can you reasonably plane a piece of wood to?

These might sound like stupid questions but I have never owned a planer before so not too familiar with their operation.
Thanks again

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CharlesA

1694 posts in 488 days


#13 posted 09-22-2013 05:00 PM

$299, free shipping, 60 day money back guarantee, easily found blades. Worth a shot. Ridgid planer.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View Richforever's profile

Richforever

739 posts in 2411 days


#14 posted 09-22-2013 05:23 PM

I like the Makita 2012NB. It is probably the quietest (although still loud). I have to carry it to the garage or back yard in order to use it. It is smooth running and nice. I built a planing sled with mdf and laminate top that allows almost anything to be planed very very thin. About the shortest piece to plane is around 10 to 12 inches (plane before cutting parts to size). Snipe is not a problem when I gently lift the back and front ends of the board as it enters and leaves the rollers in the planer. I got mine via the internet. Oh yeah – when I use it, I just clamp it to the top of a workmate folding stand and set up an infeed and outfeed roller supports in front and behind.

-- Rich, Seattle, WA

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

2874 posts in 1934 days


#15 posted 09-22-2013 05:24 PM

Check out a Woodmaster or a Foley Belsaw.

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