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Mitered box corner techniques...

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Forum topic by DKV posted 09-18-2013 09:41 PM 1203 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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DKV

3940 posts in 1969 days


09-18-2013 09:41 PM

I have been experimenting with different mitered corner arrangements for my boxes. I have done the plain mitered corners, the spline mitered corners, the keyed mitered corners and the doweled mitered corners. I like mitered because the end grain is hidden. The picture below shows what I’ve been experimenting with. The process I used was to miter the corners as normal and then plane the corner down about half way through the miter. I added a small, square length of a second wood and then planed that down to meet the box sides.

Now the question. Is there an easier process to get the same affect? The only difficult (precise) part is when planing the original miter flat and 45 to the box sides. Not hard but I want to make sure I have a flat surface to glue to and make sure one side of the vertical wood is not bigger than the other side or at least not noticable.

-- This is a Troll Free zone.


12 replies so far

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404 - Not Found

2544 posts in 2434 days


#1 posted 09-18-2013 10:10 PM

Do you have any concerns over the strength of those corners doing what you’re doing? It just doesn’t seem right to me.

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DKV

3940 posts in 1969 days


#2 posted 09-18-2013 10:12 PM

renners, no concerns until one breaks. Is it not just one long key? :-) Tiny dowels (think toothpick) might strenghten it.

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nailbanger2

1041 posts in 2608 days


#3 posted 09-18-2013 10:19 PM

Stack the two pieces with the long points flush, use a chop saw or crosscut on the table saw. Unless I’m missing something. Is the secondary wood grain parallel to the primary wood grain?

-- Wish I were Norm's Nephew

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404 - Not Found

2544 posts in 2434 days


#4 posted 09-18-2013 10:26 PM

A true key to my mind would be one interlocking and running in the direction of the grain, rather than a perpendicular appendage.
What kind of glue are you using?, how thick are the walls of your boxes typically? Are you rounding off the corners after gluing on the corner?
You mentioned ‘the vertical wood’, I think, as nailbanger is enquiring, the grain orientation should be the same as the rest of the box.

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DKV

3940 posts in 1969 days


#5 posted 09-18-2013 10:40 PM

Nail, the ebony grain runs perpendicular to the side grain. I like the saw idea.

renners, type 3, 3/8”, no.

Do not forget this is an experiment. If you guys think it will not work then it is a dead experiment. Also, my boxes are typically no more than 12” wide x no more than 9” deep. Sides are 3-4” high. I would think with half the miter still intact and dense wood for the ornamentation strip it should be strong enough for a box. No?

-- This is a Troll Free zone.

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404 - Not Found

2544 posts in 2434 days


#6 posted 09-18-2013 10:54 PM

I would still be concerned about the joint breaking doing it like that.

Perhaps the only way of really knowing for sure is to make one and test it to destruction.

The only alternative I can think of that would take Herculean strength to break, would be to box joint the whole thing, then take out a tiny rebate at the corners and glue on some thin strips so they are flush.

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DKV

3940 posts in 1969 days


#7 posted 09-18-2013 11:02 PM

...and pinned through to the side wood.

renners, I like your box joint idea but then the corners would be proud. I would probably take some of the corner off to make the thin strip sit flush.

-- This is a Troll Free zone.

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404 - Not Found

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#8 posted 09-18-2013 11:05 PM

or confirmat screws…

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DKV

3940 posts in 1969 days


#9 posted 09-19-2013 12:31 AM

Pinned, keyed and ornamented.

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gfadvm

14940 posts in 2155 days


#10 posted 09-19-2013 01:03 AM

The pinned strips should be strong enough even though they are basically glued to end grain. I like the look.

The splines certainly add strength but don’t look right coupled with the pinned strips.

My opinion for what it’s worth.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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DKV

3940 posts in 1969 days


#11 posted 09-19-2013 10:31 PM

If you do a lot of straight inlay where the end of the kerf is exposed or corner keys you know the kerf has to be flat bottomed or you get the notorious and unsightly upside down v on the bottom of the slot. For 1/8” inlays I use the Forrest WW10401125 blade which makes an absolutely flat bottom.

-- This is a Troll Free zone.

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404 - Not Found

2544 posts in 2434 days


#12 posted 09-19-2013 11:21 PM

Well, did you do the torture test?

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