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How to ID age of 2 stanely planes I have AND how to catch the plane fever

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Forum topic by Randy_ATX posted 09-18-2013 05:05 PM 742 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Randy_ATX

676 posts in 1099 days


09-18-2013 05:05 PM

I have these two Stanley planes a # 5 and # 7. I picked them up used years ago. I like to try and know the age of my tools and I assume these were made for many years. How can one narrow down the date these were made? I don’t think they are very old.

What are they worth? $50-$75 each? Both are in good shape, the #5 has a shiny japanning the #7 jappaning is all there but a dull tone – not sure what caused that.

Admittedly I don’t use them. I want to use both of these, but when I try I just get chatter and screw up the lumber. I know there is a ton of info out there. Is there a basic way to both sharpen the blades without investing much money and learn the basics so I can at least start getting some decent results? I’ve read a few articles and watched some videos but I just can’t get these to work without grabbing the wood. It must be they are not sharp enough.

Thanks

-- Randy -- Austin, TX by way of Northwest (Woodville), OH


17 replies so far

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12290 posts in 2755 days


#1 posted 09-18-2013 05:07 PM

There are a number of stanley bench plane type studies that help to identify the age of planes. Below is one.

http://www.hyperkitten.com/tools/stanley_bench_plane/

There are a bunch of blogs including mine that have info on the topics you are asking about on the site.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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Randy_ATX

676 posts in 1099 days


#2 posted 09-18-2013 05:11 PM

Thanks Wayne – the flowchart on the link you sent is great. I will poke around your blog entries too.

-- Randy -- Austin, TX by way of Northwest (Woodville), OH

View bowedcurly's profile

bowedcurly

482 posts in 386 days


#3 posted 09-18-2013 05:16 PM

Patricks Blood and Gore is a very good Stanley plane study just watch the Woodrights shop and get into the history and see the ease that handplanes make your woodworking, I use tools of today and stanley planes it has made my fit and finish of my projects 100% better, especially fitting say boxes making table legs just about ething I do a handplane is used to make the fit perfect instead of running to the tablesaw and dusting every 30 seconds you can really sneak up on a fit with a handplane have a good day

-- Staining killed the wood<<<<<>>>>>Dyeing gave it life

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Tugboater78

1027 posts in 849 days


#4 posted 09-18-2013 05:17 PM

+1 to Wayne’s link, and his blogs

-- Justin - the tugboat woodworker - " nothing changed me like the first shnick from a well sharpened, decent hand plane"

View bowedcurly's profile

bowedcurly

482 posts in 386 days


#5 posted 09-18-2013 05:20 PM

get the Veritas jig and you will have perfect sharp irons I use 2500 grit sandpaper for my final edge they cut very well the Veritas has made a world of difference in the planes edge easily shaves the hair of my arm almost scary sharp I guess it is scary sharp makes .0005 shavings

-- Staining killed the wood<<<<<>>>>>Dyeing gave it life

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Tugboater78

1027 posts in 849 days


#6 posted 09-18-2013 05:31 PM

I use an eclipse jig to sharpen, with Paul sellers diamond plates and strop to sharpen. Fairly cheap and durable but I started with the scary scarp method and it worked well,

-- Justin - the tugboat woodworker - " nothing changed me like the first shnick from a well sharpened, decent hand plane"

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Randy_ATX

676 posts in 1099 days


#7 posted 09-18-2013 05:43 PM

I just searched “eclipse jig” and this page has a lot of great looking information:
http://www3.telus.net/BrentBeach/Sharpen/jig.html

Thanks for all the advice so far, it all helps.

-- Randy -- Austin, TX by way of Northwest (Woodville), OH

View Don W's profile

Don W

15045 posts in 1225 days


#8 posted 09-18-2013 05:53 PM

I’ve also got some blogs that may help tuning and using. I’m on my phone so copy and paste don’t work so well. Catch the fever, but watch out it’s a slippery slope.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

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Randy_ATX

676 posts in 1099 days


#9 posted 09-18-2013 05:56 PM

Thanks Don – I will add your blogs as a favorite too.

-- Randy -- Austin, TX by way of Northwest (Woodville), OH

View JayT's profile

JayT

2280 posts in 868 days


#10 posted 09-18-2013 06:17 PM

Here's another Stanley type study I find very helpful, as it has lots of pictures to aid in dating. As far as value, I would place the #5 in the $25-30 range—it should be a great user, but since more #5’s were made than any other size, there are too many out there for the value to be high on standard Bailey models. The #7 I would probably value at $80-100, based on what the pic shows.

The blogs should help tremendously in tuning and use. The two most common problems I see people make when starting out are not being sharp enough and trying to take too much off in one pass. Good luck and welcome to the insanity :-)

-- "The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public's money." Alexis de Tocqueville, 1835

View sikrap's profile

sikrap

1021 posts in 2016 days


#11 posted 09-19-2013 12:37 PM

+1 on the Rexmill site. I find it to be the easiest, most accurate site for “typing” Stanley planes. As for the value, the 7 is probably worth $75 and the 5 might be worth $50 if its in really, really nice shape. 5s are as common as dirt around here and don’t bring as much money. If we knew your location, I’m sure someone would offer to have you come over for a sharpening lesson and show you how to adjust the planes. Once you get them tuned and start using them, you won’t have to ask how to get to the slope. Good Luck!!

-- Dave, Colonie, NY

View Tim's profile (online now)

Tim

1270 posts in 619 days


#12 posted 09-20-2013 12:23 AM

The blogs mentioned here are great. For the really basic, but solid introduction, Wearing's The Essential Woodworker is a good resource too. e-reader editions are $10.

Above all, have fun. When a plane is tuned it’s a lot of fun.

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Randy_ATX

676 posts in 1099 days


#13 posted 09-20-2013 08:47 PM

I’m going to set aside a couple hours this weekend and review some of these suggestions and blogs. Thanks again.

Sikrap – I’m in Austin, TX. I would LOVE for that type of offer to come in. :-)

-- Randy -- Austin, TX by way of Northwest (Woodville), OH

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Homebrew

64 posts in 843 days


#14 posted 09-27-2013 11:51 AM

Randy, Rexmill’s plane type study site should be all you need. The seven looks older than the 5 from the pics, but I’m thinking they are from the same type, the ones you have can be tricky to figure out. Post war, pre war…everything can get real blurry. Take it apart, figure out what type of frog you have, and go from there. that’s the best way to find out.

-- Scott Rieman

View mantwi's profile

mantwi

312 posts in 554 days


#15 posted 09-27-2013 03:04 PM

On the #5 the throat opening is too wide, you need to move the frog forward. There’s an adjustment screw at the base of the backside of the frog. Sharpen them too a razor finish, check the surface of the frogs to make sure they are flat and file down any humps and adjust the chipbreaker so it’s just above the cutting edge. One to three 32nds. This should eliminate the chatter. I love those old Stanleys, check out this video by Christopher Tribe on improving the performance.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WAwMzgs-1Bw

showing 1 through 15 of 17 replies

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