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Pegboard Climbing boards blowout help

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Forum topic by Robert Smith posted 09-18-2013 06:58 AM 1538 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Robert Smith

13 posts in 466 days


09-18-2013 06:58 AM

Topic tags/keywords: pine hole drilling splitting wood peg board

For the past few weeks I’ve been working on a climbing pegboard project. Currently I am only using pine until I get pass my learning curve. I first start making the holes in the board with a 1 1/4 hole saw drill on one side then the other. Next I used a 1 1/4 forstner bit but like the hole saw I had to do a lot of sanding and rasping to get the hole loose and I was getting blowouts in the back of the wood.

So I found a 1 5/16 forstner bit online. My first test I clamped two pieces of no.2 2×4’s togeter and drilled the holes. What I got was workable holes (1 9/32 would be better), but even with the clamping I am still getting blow outs.

Any help would be appreciated.

-- Robert http://fitnessgarage.storenvy.com/


15 replies so far

View hairy's profile

hairy

2109 posts in 2285 days


#1 posted 09-18-2013 11:56 AM

Use a scrap piece behind the workpiece. You get blowout when the wood fibers are not supported. When you clamped 2 pieces together only 1 had blowout, on the exit side. Try it.

-- in the confusion, I mighta grabbed the gold ...

View Robert Smith's profile

Robert Smith

13 posts in 466 days


#2 posted 09-18-2013 12:06 PM

I clamped two together and I still had minor blowouts. This is how I clamped 4 clamps on the board and two to the sawhorse. The blowout was reduced to maybe 3/64 instead of the 1/16 to 1/8 as before. Should I clamp at each hole and use one of these http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=2406&site=ROCKLER with the stop on. I think I forgot to mention I am using a hand drill because a drill press isn’t practical for this application.

-- Robert http://fitnessgarage.storenvy.com/

View William's profile

William

9287 posts in 1596 days


#3 posted 09-18-2013 12:07 PM

I’m not sure exactly what it is you’re making so my suggestion may not help one bit.

The backer board suggestion usually works well. Some time ago though I was making some bullet blocks that required a lot of holes close together. Because of this, I got blowouts even with a backer board.
I struggled with this one with much aggrevation. I wound up shelving the idea until a solution came to mind one day that worked.
Here’s what I done that may or may not work on your project.

I measured and set the depth stop on my drill press so that when I drilled the holes I did not go all the way through on wood that was thicker than I needed to start with and then drilled all the holes on one side.
Then I used my band saw to remove the amount of wood from the bottom to bring the wood thickness to what I needed.
This left clean holes on top and bottom.
If you don’t have a good enough band saw, you could also remove the extra material with a table saw, hand saw, planet with a very sharp blade, hand plane, or jointer.
I’ve tried all these methods to test the process and they work but I prefer the band saw.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View Robert Smith's profile

Robert Smith

13 posts in 466 days


#4 posted 09-18-2013 12:38 PM

That is a great Idea I am going to try it with the jointer. Were you able to drill within 1/32 without a blowout? What was your drill press technique, such as fast speed slow removal?

-- Robert http://fitnessgarage.storenvy.com/

View hairy's profile

hairy

2109 posts in 2285 days


#5 posted 09-18-2013 01:27 PM

You could drill halfway, flip it over and drill the rest.

-- in the confusion, I mighta grabbed the gold ...

View William's profile

William

9287 posts in 1596 days


#6 posted 09-18-2013 01:44 PM

Drill speed was according to bit. With the blocks I was drilling with HSS Forster bits, so fast speed.
I am not sure about how thick I left the unbored material. I set it so that the tiny point at the end I the forstner bit Barry peaked through without actually making a through hole.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View casual1carpenter's profile

casual1carpenter

353 posts in 1229 days


#7 posted 09-18-2013 06:31 PM

COLUMBUS27, If you have hand drilled a lot of metal you might have noticed a twitch of the wrist at the point of break thru. That Rockler Jig might help you out with with perpendicular alignment and control. According to Rockler the Drill Guide must be used with Long Shank Forstner Bits and associated 3/8” Stop Collar. Grand total about $60 US.

In looking at the pic you posted it appears that the hole is finished with a round over profile. That round over chamfer would remove the slight blowouts and facilitate getting the peg into the hole. Just a thought

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

3589 posts in 2714 days


#8 posted 09-18-2013 08:19 PM

And pine is really soft as well as being prone to back side tear-out.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View William's profile

William

9287 posts in 1596 days


#9 posted 09-18-2013 09:33 PM

I missed the part about using pine.
And after seeing the photo too, I don’t know if there is a way to do that with pine and still avoid blowouts.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View jumbojack's profile

jumbojack

1221 posts in 1377 days


#10 posted 09-18-2013 09:58 PM

Foolproof way to drill holes.NO BLOWOUT!

1) Mark the locations of all your through bores.
2) Drill through with a 1/16” bit
3) Bore the backside with the correct bit, about t a quarter of the way. The 1/16” hole will mark the way
4) Flip and do the front side. Since the small hole is lined up with the bottom the two will meet in the middle. You just must take care to predrill straight.

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

View RPhillips's profile

RPhillips

799 posts in 589 days


#11 posted 09-18-2013 11:57 PM

^ yep, what he said.

on another note, why not use some 3/4” birch plywood and double it up? seems like it would be much better for your application than using pine. The ones that I have seen were made from baltic birch plywood, and one 5×5 sheet would be suitable to make several.

Also, instead of making your holes larger, you could chuck up the pegs in a drill (you could drill a small hole and put a 10D finish nail in the end so you can chuck it, then cut it off) and slightly reduce the diameter in the last 2” or so. Only two pegs, but a lot more holes.

-- Rob - Indianapolis IN - Learning... one mistake at a time...

View Robert Smith's profile

Robert Smith

13 posts in 466 days


#12 posted 09-19-2013 12:25 AM

RPhillips I would use birch but I am just trying to get pass the learning curve. Just picked up a drill press today. Thanks for all of the great suggestions.

-- Robert http://fitnessgarage.storenvy.com/

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

11550 posts in 1443 days


#13 posted 09-19-2013 01:07 AM

Jumbojack does it like I do when blowout must be avoided.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View BentheViking's profile

BentheViking

1755 posts in 1317 days


#14 posted 09-19-2013 02:50 AM

Jumbo jacks suggestion was how I was drilling out for my cabinet handle screw holes tonight. I always got annoyed by having to constantly move the backer block when doing cabinet door handles.

-- It's made of wood. Real sturdy.--Chubbs Peterson

View Robert Smith's profile

Robert Smith

13 posts in 466 days


#15 posted 09-24-2013 12:31 AM

So I did some more practice this weekend. I purchased this http://www.sears.com/craftsman-drill-guide/p-00967173000P?prdNo=1&blockNo=1&blockType=G1 The chuck is junk and it is not perfectly perpendicular to the wood. But with that said the holes on one side are better than free hand. Unfortunately when I tried to drill through the opposite side, the holes sometimes line up perfectly.

So what I was thinking was to drill 3/4 the way through then rout the other end. What type and size of router bit would you suggest.

-- Robert http://fitnessgarage.storenvy.com/

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