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Forum topic by Bark to Blade posted 09-15-2013 02:29 AM 975 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Bark to Blade

36 posts in 1980 days


09-15-2013 02:29 AM

Topic tags/keywords: tablesaw

Hello All,

Wondering if any one has ever used CLR for rust removal on a cast iron top? Rust isn’t pitted or anything just a build up from ocean air and humidity. Really would like to work on this tomorrow, but don’t want to drive all the way to woodcraft. Any suggestions welcome?

Thanks All!


10 replies so far

View map's profile

map

92 posts in 2976 days


#1 posted 09-15-2013 03:17 AM

My recommendation would be EvapoRust. It is available in most auto parts stores. works well, is not particularly toxic, can be reused and is relatively inexpensive.

map

-- measure once, cut once, swear, start over

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fredj

185 posts in 1280 days


#2 posted 09-15-2013 03:43 AM

I’ve heard of EvapoRust but never used it. What I have done is sanded with wet/dry paper and light oil. Wipe dry and wax.

-- Fredj

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7913 posts in 1843 days


#3 posted 09-15-2013 04:01 AM

For light rust I would go at it with WD40 and a green pad. CLR would be fine, it’s just an acidic mixture like Naval Jelly or toilet bowl cleaner.

http://youtu.be/uRn97evxSeI

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11806 posts in 3151 days


#4 posted 09-15-2013 04:10 AM

The thing with EvapOrust is, you have to rinse it off with water and dry it before “flash rust” tarnishes your tool all over again. If it is only surface rust, then I would also suggest a light oil and a scuff pad or very fine wet-dry sandpaper with the oil. Wipe off the residue with a rag and Mineral Spirits and when dry, coat it with wax : )

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

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Rick M

7913 posts in 1843 days


#5 posted 09-15-2013 04:26 AM

My understanding was that Evaporust leaves a rust inhibiting grey residue.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Bark to Blade

36 posts in 1980 days


#6 posted 09-15-2013 04:38 AM

thanks everyone, much appreciated!

Rick, had looked on you tube and not seen that video. Think I will start with WD-40 and some scotch brite pads. Some paint thinner, mineral spirits and then I have some wax I picked up at woodcraft couple months back.

View MarkSr's profile

MarkSr

215 posts in 1513 days


#7 posted 09-15-2013 04:55 AM

mikeinsf, you probably have heard of this before but: ”IT WORKS” as long as there are no deep pits. I don’t know if you look at the Wood Working Shop naming contest I just ran 2 weeks ago. The old two man saw blade was shown natural before I removed the rust. I used 2 old plug in drills with a wire brush attachment. Two drills because I didn’t want them to get to hot. AND just pour, right from the bottle of Coke. little at a time spread around with a coke soaked cloth and start sanding with the wire wheel.

Using Evaporust is quite expensive and I have had good luck ONLY with items I could soak overnight. Anything that I had to wipe on or brush on, and then use sandpaper never worked out for me.

But that old saw blade came out pritty good with Coke and wire wheel with a plugged in drill.

Good Luck, “that’s all I’m saying”
Mark

-- Mark, ”...NEWBEE: On the road to learning a lot; but; a lot more to learn…” ("My Granddad used to tell me, if you didn't learn something new today, it just wasn't worth getting out of bed")

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MarkSr

215 posts in 1513 days


#8 posted 09-15-2013 05:06 AM

BTW, you all know I was talking about Pepsi’s competitor Coke, the drinkable kind, not the powder stuff. LOL

-- Mark, ”...NEWBEE: On the road to learning a lot; but; a lot more to learn…” ("My Granddad used to tell me, if you didn't learn something new today, it just wasn't worth getting out of bed")

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11806 posts in 3151 days


#9 posted 09-15-2013 04:29 PM

HiRickM, once you remove the rust from the item, you can re-dip it in the solution and let it dry. That will give you up to 2 weeks of rust inhibition according to the label. However, if you plan on applying a finish to the item, you have to wash off the solution first. Things will rust again all too soon as I’ve found out.
E-O-R is best used when you can totally submerge the item in the solution , rinse it off and dry it quickly.
I tried using rags soaked in the EOR on my restoration of my antique Powermatic 8” jointer. Ended up having to sand the surfaces due to the discoloration caused by the unevenness of the rags on the surfaces. It’s amazing how cast iron can get stained by a liquid : (

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View rum's profile

rum

148 posts in 2049 days


#10 posted 09-16-2013 09:46 PM

There is a jell version of evoporust as well although I haven’t tried it.

I recently got ~10 lbs of citric acid (aka vitamin C) from ebay, an ounce or two in a bucket of water removed rust just as fast as evaporust and is a lot cheaper (so I have years of de-rusting but that was where the shipping break kicked in so :D Loml can use it for her yarn dying as well so all good). There is more of a post-rust removal flash rusting problem with this though. I’ve thought about trying some honerite gold for a quick dip afterwards (I use it with my water stones and it works dandy there) but haven’t gotten around to trying it. Another option I have tried is to let a smidge of flash rust build up then dunk it into boiling water which converts the red oxide FeO3 to black FeO4 and also causes it to dry pretty fast afterwards so it doesn’t flash rust much after that (can still some but usually not much).

Also Yes if you re-dip in evaporust it stops the flash rust; however once the solution gets groddy re-dipping will also leave a lot of FeO4 (black iron oxide crud) on the tool as well which can leave streaks/stains on anything it touches afterwards so you’d really want a clean batch for that. Dusty I think you might just have been having issues with that on your jointer – and sadly no I don’t have a solution would love to know of one though :D

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