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Forum topic by ScrubPlane posted 213 days ago 666 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ScrubPlane

185 posts in 693 days


213 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: question lathe turning

Does anyone have any of the Easy Wood (turning) tools they’d be interested in selling, thank you.


7 replies so far

View Rick M.'s profile

Rick M.

3357 posts in 878 days


#1 posted 213 days ago

I have 2 EWT and 2 carbide tools I made. The EWT are nicely made but not remotely worth the money and the carbide blades I bought off ebay are much sharper and cut cleaner than the carbides that came with my EWTs. I recommend you just make your own. You can have a full set for the price of one EWT.

-- |Statistics show that 100% of people bitten by a snake were close to it.|

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Dan Krager

1355 posts in 732 days


#2 posted 213 days ago

Thanks for the tip, Rick. I’d been looking at the EWT and others wondering how they perform. I’ll stick with my HSS tools that leave a gleaming finish that even the finest sandpapers will spoil.
DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com

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ScrubPlane

185 posts in 693 days


#3 posted 213 days ago

I have several EWT’s now and very much like how they work. I think, within some respects, the end result and/or one’s view of their capability is relative to what one is used to in addition to learning the new tool. I’ve taken up turning again for the first time since high school and couldn’t really afford a decent full set of HSS nor have I ever developed the knack for sharpening.

Within a few months with my EWT’s, I’ve turned pieces as smooth as ceramic without sanding though not that there hasn’t been the odd FUBAR along the way.

In the end, while I think a full blown set of tools may be more versatile…the learning (i.e. ‘mastery’) curve with the EWT’s is extremely shallow and I spend all of my time turning as opposed to sharpening.

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Rick M.

3357 posts in 878 days


#4 posted 213 days ago

I’ve watched hundreds of turning videos and have yet to see a guy that didn’t use sandpaper so Dan I congratulate you. I learned turning with traditional skew and gouge but I have enough stuff to sharpen so I opted for carbide. The EWTs are nice but I can make 13 carbide tools for the price of one EWT.

-- |Statistics show that 100% of people bitten by a snake were close to it.|

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Dan Krager

1355 posts in 732 days


#5 posted 212 days ago

You can see an example of what I’m saying about no sandpaper in a picture on the “Can we talk chisels” thread, post 1547, but I now see the pics have been deleted. I turned a set of handles for Smitty. So see them at http://kragerwoodworking.weebly.com/1/post/2013/07/chisel-handle-replacements.html
or at
https://www.facebook.com/KragerCustomWoodProducts?ref=hl
With this link you have to go to the recent posts to see the same chisel handles. But the header pic is of handles I turned for myself.

You really can’t tell from a picture unless you have a microscope, but there is a noticeable difference, especially if the wood is porous like walnut, oak, pecan or hickory to name a few that turn really well. Sanded, the pores tend to fill and get fuzzy. Cut cleanly, the pores exit cleanly and I think add a great deal of beauty to the wood.
Not wanting to kick off an argument, just stating my experience. A well sharpened piece of carbide will cut cleanly too.
DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com

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Rick M.

3357 posts in 878 days


#6 posted 212 days ago

The impressive thing about no sanding isn’t the finish so much because a large part of that is the HSS burnishing the wood, but that your skew control must be very good. There is no doubt about it, HSS cuts cleaner and leaves a smoother finish.

-- |Statistics show that 100% of people bitten by a snake were close to it.|

View Dan Krager's profile

Dan Krager

1355 posts in 732 days


#7 posted 212 days ago

I’ve learned that a skew on a round shaft helps a LOT! I put a 25 degree (cutting edge) x 15 degree skew angle on the end of a HSS (A2?) shaft and have found it very easy to control.
DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com

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