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Using Real Copper with Cracks and Voids?

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Forum topic by richardwootton posted 342 days ago 751 views 1 time favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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richardwootton

1155 posts in 582 days


342 days ago

I seem to remember a project or two where Copper was used to fill voids and then epoxied in. It looked like the copper had actually been melted or turned into a nugget that would conform to the sape of the void, but I can’t say for sure. Does anyone know how this is done? I would like to try it in a couple table tops that I’m working on. Thanks in advance!

-- Richard, Hot Springs, Ar -- Galoot In Training


9 replies so far

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bondogaposis

2480 posts in 978 days


#1 posted 342 days ago

I think you are thinking about powdered copper mixed w/ epoxy. Here is a source.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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richardwootton

1155 posts in 582 days


#2 posted 342 days ago

I have seen that before, I’ll have to look back through my favorites so I can convey exactly what I am referring to. If I were to use a torch to heat some copper pipe to melting point and allowed it to drip into the void with something flat underneath to catch it and allow it to fill, would it just cause the wood to burn? Could I apply something to act as a barrier between the copper and wood so the it would still take the correct shape?

-- Richard, Hot Springs, Ar -- Galoot In Training

View Mark Kornell's profile

Mark Kornell

477 posts in 1157 days


#3 posted 342 days ago

Copper melts at 1984°F, while wood’s flashpoint is around 600°F (depends on the wood). I’d go the epoxy/copper powder route :-)

-- Mark Kornell, Kornell Wood Design

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richardwootton

1155 posts in 582 days


#4 posted 342 days ago

Ha! Thanks Mark, I guess I could have googled that and saved myself the need for this thread! It looks like it will be using the powdered copper and epoxy route after all . . .

-- Richard, Hot Springs, Ar -- Galoot In Training

View Tim's profile

Tim

1241 posts in 588 days


#5 posted 342 days ago

Richard, if someone did that, they molded it in something else. There are a variety of ways to cast metal and make the mold like wax and plaster casting etc. You could make a mold of the crack, reverse it, then cast the copper and machine it/file it to fit.

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richardwootton

1155 posts in 582 days


#6 posted 342 days ago

Tim, there’s an idea I hadn’t thought of. It does sound like a good deal of work, but I guess I’ve never beenafraid of a little extra work before. It might even give me an opportunity to learn a new skill…

-- Richard, Hot Springs, Ar -- Galoot In Training

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

2790 posts in 1870 days


#7 posted 341 days ago

You might want to investigate the stuff dentists use for temporary fillings. It is a paste and sets up as hard as a rock. I don’t see how they can call it temporary. Another is called “Rocktite”. It could be mixed with metal powders if needed.

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

1286 posts in 884 days


#8 posted 341 days ago

Richard, here is another option that might be a little less work. FWIW

http://www.inlaceonline.com/text/products/kits.html

-- Art

View shampeon's profile

shampeon

1346 posts in 810 days


#9 posted 341 days ago

You can buy bronze powders in all kinds of different colors.
http://www.crescentbronze.com/order_products/metallic_powders

-- ian | "You can't stop what's coming. It ain't all waiting on you. That's vanity."

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