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Forum topic by Charlie posted 321 days ago 704 views 1 time favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Charlie

1001 posts in 890 days


321 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: question

Tomorrow morning I’m going to pick up a pair of Disston hand saws. They appear to be a D8 and a D20. Pretty common I think. The guy advertised these as “3 Disston hand saws”, but one of them isn’t a Disston. It’s a Simonds and still has the nice blue medallion with 2-50 in it.

My question is…. is there a quick way to expose the etch without wrecking it?
My intention is to clean the saws up, have them set and sharpened and use them. I just want ‘em to look better. :)

here’s a pic

thanks!


11 replies so far

View Don W's profile

Don W

14670 posts in 1172 days


#1 posted 321 days ago

Look at this series, http://lumberjocks.com/Brit/blog/series/4708

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

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SamuelP

738 posts in 1250 days


#2 posted 321 days ago

Times 2 on Don W.

-- -Sam - Tampa, FL- "A man who carries a cat by the tail learns somthing he can in no other way" -Mark Twain

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Tim

1184 posts in 566 days


#3 posted 321 days ago

Andy’s series has tons of good stuff on making the saws look better, but I didn’t see much detail on how to clean the saw plates to save the etch.
I may have missed it,

Here’s a few methods to clean the plate. Not sure if any of these go into redoing the etch, but most of them describe using a sanding block and going easy over the etch to not lighten it too much.
http://thesawblog.com/?p=627
http://www.vintagesaws.com/library/saw_clean/saw_clean.html
http://www.wkfinetools.com/trestore/saw/sawblade-bobstu/restsawblade-1.asp
http://www.badaxetoolworks.com/cleaning-a-sawplate.html

I used the first one because that’s the stuff I had around.

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A10GAC

189 posts in 1682 days


#4 posted 321 days ago

Check out Bob Sturgeon’s article on enhancing the etch over at WKfinetools.com (I’d post a direct link,but my tablet is being a pain) www.wkfinetools.com/tRestore/saw/etch/etch.asp

He uses a brass darkening solution, but I have also read that a gun cold blue solution will work.

I just saw that Tim linked Bob’s full saw restore article above….also a good read.

-- Men have become the tools of their tools. - Henry David Thoreau

View Charlie's profile

Charlie

1001 posts in 890 days


#5 posted 321 days ago

Not sure this qualifies as a real “restore”. The bottom saw in the first post is the Simonds. I took it apart and cleaned it up and put it back together. It’s a Simonds 62 skew back “blue ribbon”. The emblem on this one has blue coloring and the numbers “2-50” along with the Simonds manufacturing lettering around the rim. Apparently that particular emblem is shown in their 1914 catalog. A buffing wheel with jeweler’s rouge didn’t remove any of the blue. When I removed the handle, the saw plate was really clean underneath. The wood has no cracks but there’s a couple of small chips on the underside of one of the horns. I scrubbed it with mineral spirits, sanded lightly, and then oiled it. It’s not pristine, but that wasn’t the point for me. I just want to get it back to being used. Under the handle was the number “19” stamped into the saw plate. And then low at the heel is stamped “5 1/2”.

It cuts, but needs sharpening pretty badly. The teeth appear to be in great condition. It’s just dull. Here are some pics. You tell me if this qualifies as a restore… hehehhe

View Don W's profile

Don W

14670 posts in 1172 days


#6 posted 321 days ago

yeeeuuuuppp

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View Tim's profile

Tim

1184 posts in 566 days


#7 posted 321 days ago

Looking good. Now just make a saw vice, get some saw files, watch Andy’s video, and finish it up! It’s not as hard as it seems. If you really want to send it out, prices vary from the local semi-retired guy making hobby money (if you can find him) up to the professional guys like Matt Cianci and Mark Harrell (Bad Axe Saw Works) who charge $50 or so plus a lot if they need more work and you have to ship it to them.

A10GAC, that’s a good one on the etch. Surprised he liked a brass darkening solution better than one made for steel, but whatever works.

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chrisstef

10438 posts in 1611 days


#8 posted 321 days ago

Sharpening isn’t as daunting as it seems. Heck, if I can do it, anyone can. Rip saws are a bit easier and a great place to start is something like 5-6 ppi.

A couple of trips through Brit’s video and I was off and running. I find it to be a really enjoyable task minus a biot of metal on metal screeching.

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

View Charlie's profile

Charlie

1001 posts in 890 days


#9 posted 321 days ago

Yeah the Simonds is a 5-1/2 which I’m assuming is a rip saw, but the teeth are ground more like I’d expect on a crosscut.

The D8 Disston would probably be my next cleanup. I measured the PPI and it’s apparently an 8. It has a crack in the handle running from the lower right bolt to the pointy cutout area of the grip. Doesn’t look bad and it’s not open, but I can see it lurking there. Between the D8 and the D20, the D8 saw plate is straightest. I can see one slight departure when I turn it teeth up and sight down the line. I’ve gotten it nearly perfect by simply flexing the saw a few times.

The D20 might be a tosser. I knew they were tapered a lot, but this one struck me as being pretty narrow at the toe. Upon a really quick cleanup I can see it’s been reground so many times, half of the etch is gone. It also has the wonkiest plate and at least 2 cracks in the handle.. So maybe that’s my “practice saw”. I can get the hang of straightening the blade and maybe use it to practice sharpening (once I buy some saw files)

I called a couple places regarding getting the Simonds sharpened. Mostly I got “I can’t do it. My machine only goes down to 7.”
Haven’t come across anyone that does it for “hobby money” so…. I might be learning how to hand sharpen a saw. :)

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chrisstef

10438 posts in 1611 days


#10 posted 321 days ago

You can always salvage the handle and the brass for parts or you could cut the saw down for a backsaw or smaller panel saw from that D20 but youre right, there isn’t much plate left.

The couple of rips saws ive done had an appearances of a crosscut as well too Charlie it might be the set that is making it look that way.

If for some reason that saw kicks around unsharpened until the early winter months I might be your hobby money guy. Id jump all over the opportunity to sharpen it up for ya if I wasn’t in the middle of a kitchen remod. It’s taken me about 3 hours a saw to get them right again and that has included reshaping all of the teeth. If it just need a freshening up id say it can be done in around an hour.

Can we get a close up of the teeth on it?

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

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BigYin

228 posts in 1020 days


#11 posted 321 days ago

the D20
Glue up the handle then shorten it and you have a nice toolbag saw, round the tip top corner and file in a nib and you will have a nice dressy toolbag saw and get another 20 years out of it.

-- ... Never Apologise For Being Right ...

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