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How to smooth wood that has been re-sawn?

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Forum topic by MrRon posted 344 days ago 986 views 0 times favorited 24 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MrRon

2791 posts in 1871 days


344 days ago

I resaw some wood on the bandsaw into strips that are 9/32” thick. Because of their rough surface, how do I get a finished 1/4” thickness. I don’t have a drum sander, but I do have a surface planer. I’m not sure if 9/32” is thick enough to get 1/4” finish using a planer. If I go with 5/16” resaw, it would probably work, but I may not get the number of slabs I need.


24 replies so far

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Woodbum

427 posts in 1693 days


#1 posted 344 days ago

Mr. Ron:Better you than me running 9/32” strips through a planer. Look out for wood shrapnel. I personally would not do it, or would only do it with a carrier board with the strips double stick taped down to it. But even then, probably not. It’s one of those things that if your gut initially tells you NO WAY, then you probably need to go with your gut. That is just my opinion and I could be wrong.

-- Improvidus, Apto quod Victum-- Improvise, Adapt, Overcome

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MrRon

2791 posts in 1871 days


#2 posted 344 days ago

I’m using pine. The strips are 1/4”x2-1/4”x12”.

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skyboy_psu

20 posts in 697 days


#3 posted 344 days ago

Look up Izzy Swan’s table-saw-into-jointer-sled. You can find this here or on youtube. It is just a table saw sled that will hold a long, thin piece parallel to the blade. With this, you’ll get smooth cuts. You should be able to get the 1/4” wide by 2&1/4 tall cuts on the table saw (maybe with 2 passes). You’ll lose a little more with the table saw kerf, but if your planer splinters these boards, they’ll be lost with that method.

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JayT

2179 posts in 838 days


#4 posted 344 days ago

Hand plane and a thicknessing jig would get you there quickly and safely.

-- "The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public's money." Alexis de Tocqueville, 1835

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

2867 posts in 1114 days


#5 posted 344 days ago

2 1/4” wide? Build a thin strip jig and cut them on your table saw with a glue line rip blade.
Sand to a perfect finish, or use a card scraper.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

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rrww

263 posts in 740 days


#6 posted 344 days ago

Drum sander would make short work of these.

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theoldfart

4017 posts in 1078 days


#7 posted 344 days ago

Another hand tool option:

No limit on width with this setup

-- "Aged flatus, I heard that some one has already blown out your mortise." THE Surgeon ……………………………………. Kevin

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MrRon

2791 posts in 1871 days


#8 posted 344 days ago

I just tried finishing them with the surface planer and no problem. I was able to get them down to a uniform thickness. These are for sides for boxes. I have to make about 60 boxes and two 15” long strips will make one box. There’s a lot of cutting to do, so I’m looking for the best way so as to minimize waste. BTW, i’m using 2×4 material cut to 15” long lengths; running the boards through on the table saw to remove the rounded corners; then resawing as many 2-1/4”x1/4” pieces as I can get. With the bandsaw, I can get 4 strips, but If I use the table saw to resaw, I will lose one strip.

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theoldfart

4017 posts in 1078 days


#9 posted 344 days ago

Hand plane may take a while :)

-- "Aged flatus, I heard that some one has already blown out your mortise." THE Surgeon ……………………………………. Kevin

View joeyinsouthaustin's profile

joeyinsouthaustin

1245 posts in 700 days


#10 posted 344 days ago

Glad you made it through. Just be aware. I agree with others who have mentioned, that as soon you get that thin they can rip apart in the planer, especially at the exit. It has happened to me personally several times. I don’t know why I keep going back and trying, but oh well… Probably cause it is a PITA to get it clean another way.

-- Who is John Galt?

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tefinn

1207 posts in 1064 days


#11 posted 344 days ago

Most planers will plane down to 1/4” with no problem. I plane to 1/8” regularly using a carrier board or a piece of 3/4” melamine with cleats to hold it within the planer. Using the latter method I’ve planed to 1/16” on occasion. This is a common way to thickness thin material in a planer.

-- Tom Finnigan - Measures? We don't need no stinking measures! - Hmm, maybe thats why my project pieces don't fit.

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badcrayon

33 posts in 448 days


#12 posted 344 days ago

I can use my planer to get down to 1/16th an inch with an MDF sled and a little hot glue at te edges.

-- Bad Crayon Studio

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joeyinsouthaustin

1245 posts in 700 days


#13 posted 344 days ago

Just to throw it out there. I have used these methods as well. It does work, and the wood doesn’t fail every time…. but I have personally experienced failures using each method. Only once, without any sled, did it cause any lasting damage to my planer. I lost an impeller blade on a dwalt 735 planing oak to 1/4”. It usually has happened on exit, but on occasion in the middle. Now I am not trying to say this practice is dangerous, or should never be attempted. I am just sharing my experience, and echoing the experiences of other. I did have to fix a planer, and have bunged up a couple of knives…. That said, I still try it every now and then, so that says that.

-- Who is John Galt?

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bigblockyeti

1469 posts in 348 days


#14 posted 344 days ago

The pine worries me a little, I have experience too thin (& strong) wood being shattered by planer blades that were in good shape. In addition to using a sled of some kind, it would also be a good idea to make sure all the boards are butted together tightly to reduce the chance of the blades grabbing the wood and cutting down on snipe at the same time.

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MrRon

2791 posts in 1871 days


#15 posted 344 days ago

I don’t like the idea of planing a piece that is rough on both sides. Maybe it would be better if I took one slice, set it aside and run the rough stock through the planer to get a smooth surface; then take another slice with the bandsaw and so on. Then I will end up with a lot of smooth, one side slices that I can run through the planer at my final 1/4” setting.

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