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Forum topic by 12strings posted 219 days ago 624 views 0 times favorited 24 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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12strings

362 posts in 884 days


219 days ago

Is there any way to identify a plane with absolutely no markings? I just got a #3 sized smoother, with no markings, numbers, logos, nothing…the only oddity is there is no lateral adjustment.

I plan to just use it, and it is working pretty good after an initial cleaning, tuning, sharpening…but it would be nice to know what it is…maybe an online database with pics?

-- I'm strictly hand-tool only...unless the power tool is faster and easier!


24 replies so far

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

11988 posts in 2597 days


#1 posted 219 days ago

Photos would help. Also look at the inside cutter adjusting knob. Their may be a name and patent date there. You may need to clean it out with a q-tip and some alcohol, orange cleaner or such. Usually the lack of a latteral adjuster indicates that the plane is quite early. Take a look at the frog and make sure it has not just been broken off.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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WayneC

11988 posts in 2597 days


#2 posted 219 days ago

Info

Stanley
http://www.hyperkitten.com/tools/stanley_bench_plane/

Union (Catalog)
http://toolemera.com/catpdf/union1905cat.pdf

Sargent
http://www.sargent-planes.com/sargent-plane-pointers/

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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12strings

362 posts in 884 days


#3 posted 218 days ago

Thanks for the tip about looking at the cutter adjustment knob…I couldn’t make out all the words with my quick glance this morning (I had to run off to work), but it definitely said “Bailey Patent….............”

So maybe it’s a pre-stanley bailey plane? I will get some better light and my glasses and see if I can make out the rest.

It definitely never had a lateral adjustment lever…There’s no space for one.

Here’s 2 pics in 3 formats…not sure if they will work, if not please advise..

-- I'm strictly hand-tool only...unless the power tool is faster and easier!

View JayT's profile

JayT

1733 posts in 711 days


#4 posted 218 days ago

Looks like it could be about a type 4 Stanley.

Here is another really good plane typing site with pictures. It may help you figure out some more.

-- "The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public's money." Alexis de Tocqueville, 1835

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12strings

362 posts in 884 days


#5 posted 218 days ago

JayT, That’s a very good site. I think you may be right. the depth adjustment knob, including the font and location of the writing is just like mine…Mine has no numbers cast into the bed, but the site says that is optional…also, the depth adjustment knob turns in the opposite direction from my type 15 NO. 5…this one turns counter clock-wise to tighten.

If it is a Type 4, is that worth anything more than being a user?

-- I'm strictly hand-tool only...unless the power tool is faster and easier!

View Don W's profile

Don W

13924 posts in 1067 days


#6 posted 218 days ago

Some pictures of the frog, frog base and back side of the lever cap may gives some clues as well. Its probably not a pre-stanley, and I agree with JayT on a type 4, but it could be a type 3. Either way its a great plane to have.

-- There is nothing like the sound of a well tuned hand plane. - http://timetestedtools.wordpress.com (timetestedtools at hotmail dot c0m)

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12strings

362 posts in 884 days


#7 posted 218 days ago

It’s definitely not a type 3, due to the frog shape…I think the 4’s have it…Thanks. I always know where to come for this type of info.

I’m really glad I grabbed this. It was $10, the blade has plenty of length left, and was flat, it mates well with the chip-breaker with minimal sharpening, the casting has no cracks, and the depth adjustment works smoothly (after a mid-level cleaning). The only real damage is a repaired rear tote, which is only a cosmetic flaw.

I might be done amassing planes now, if I can get my old wooden rabbet plane to work acceptably.

—> ONE MORE QUESTION FOR YOU’S GUYS:

I have been using my #5 as a sort of smoother without much camber, and using a wooden jack plane with a significant camber…should i, now that I have a smoother (this type 4 no. 3), re-sharpen the #5 as a true jack, and not use the wooden one anymore? Or perhaps make the wooden camber even more extreme like a scrub, then have a mid-level camber on the #5? Or perhaps Get a Chip-breaker to match my cambered blade, so that I have 2 blade/chip-breaker sets for the #5, one cambered, and one mostly straight…and then get rid of the woodie?

I want all the planes I have to be useful, and don’t want to have a plane I never use…If that becomes the case, I will get rid of one. (Yes, I realize this is the exact opposite of most Hand-plane guys).

Current Arsenal:
-Ohio tools Wooden Try Plane (22”, works wonderfully)
-Wooden (made by me) Jack Plane (13.5”) with heavy camber
-Type 15, No. 5 – (formerly my fine-finish plane, as I had no true smoother)
-NEW (really old) Type 4, No. 3 smoother
-Block Plane
-Wooden Rabbet Plane (still tuning this one).

-- I'm strictly hand-tool only...unless the power tool is faster and easier!

View Homebrew's profile

Homebrew

64 posts in 686 days


#8 posted 218 days ago

If it’s a type three or a type four it still should have markings on the brass adjuster knob.

-- Scott Rieman

View 12strings's profile

12strings

362 posts in 884 days


#9 posted 218 days ago

It does, perhaps I wasn’t clear…It has circular writing on the knob…”Bailey Patent…..(can’t read that part yet).”

-- I'm strictly hand-tool only...unless the power tool is faster and easier!

View JayT's profile

JayT

1733 posts in 711 days


#10 posted 218 days ago

Of your options, I would immediately throw out the multiple iron set-ups on the #5. Switching from a cambered to straight iron is easy, but you would likely need to adjust the mouth every time, as well, which can become a pain in the butt.

If it were me, I would use everything like you have it for a while. You may find that you like having two slightly different smoothing planes. My go to smoothers are #4 size, but I also keep a #3, a #4-1/2 and #6 set up similarly for times when they are more useful. There are situations when the added mass of a larger plane really helps or when you need to get into smaller areas and want the smaller plane.

If, after a bit of time, you find that you are no longer using the #5 as a smoother, it could easily be reground with a very heavy camber for use as a scrub/fore plane if you find yourself needing one or sold off if you don’t. Personally, I think an iron plane would serve better as the scrub/fore plane than a wooden one, so would keep the woodie in your current set up as a jack.

If that becomes the case, I will get rid of one

Blasphemy! :-)

-- "The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public's money." Alexis de Tocqueville, 1835

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12strings

362 posts in 884 days


#11 posted 218 days ago

I tend to agree about not switching irons, but I have heard of it being done…what makes you prefer the iron plane over the woodie for scrubbing?

I’m just curious because my general thinking is that the scrub planes depth of adjustment is not as vital as a smoother, so for me, I have difficulty doing fine adustments with wooden planes…so prefer metal for that, but for roughing, a woodie is lighter.

-- I'm strictly hand-tool only...unless the power tool is faster and easier!

View JayT's profile

JayT

1733 posts in 711 days


#12 posted 218 days ago

For taking deep cuts, I prefer the extra mass of the iron plane to help out. (I realize a #40 scrub is very small and light, but it is also taking very narrow cuts—I use a #6 as a fore plane). Additionally, the iron plane should wear better. Depending on the wood used in your plane and what you are planing, I would think that a rough sawn surface could tear up the sole of the plane pretty quickly. I could be wrong, never having used a woodie to scrub, but that is what the common sense side of my brain says.

I have difficulty doing fine adustments with wooden planes

I do, too, but practice and a good plane mallet can do wonders. I can actually set my recently built wooden smoother more precisely than my iron ones, it just takes a bit of tinkering. Every time I use it, though, adjusting goes faster.

-- "The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public's money." Alexis de Tocqueville, 1835

View Don W's profile

Don W

13924 posts in 1067 days


#13 posted 218 days ago

I am 100% in agreement with JayT. The reason I like the metal for scrub is I find a metal plane is easier to grasp. The only wood planes I have that get much use are smoothers, but just like JayT my go to smoother is a 604. If however you like the woodies for rough work, I’d say by all means stick with it. I think a lot of how we feel about it is what we started out with.

I never understood the switching iron thing. You already proved you can buy a really nice plane in great user condition for $10. Why you would go to the hassle of re-adjusting a plane every time you wanted to switch for that kind of money is beyond me.

Eventually I would pick up a later type #3. I use a lot of planes and started just like you, but as my collection grows, I know accidents happen. If I dropped and broke a type 14 #3 i’d cry like a baby. Drop and break that pre-lateral and I’d probably have a stroke. I’m certainly not suggesting you not use it. I’m just sayin…....pretend it’s your first born.

-- There is nothing like the sound of a well tuned hand plane. - http://timetestedtools.wordpress.com (timetestedtools at hotmail dot c0m)

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12strings

362 posts in 884 days


#14 posted 218 days ago

I made my Main woodie for rough work is made of purple-heart, so I’m not overly concerned about wear…as I generally only use pine, poplar, red oak, and cherry. I made it 4 years ago, and haven’t noticed any significant wear spots on the bottom of it.

-- I'm strictly hand-tool only...unless the power tool is faster and easier!

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12strings

362 posts in 884 days


#15 posted 218 days ago

Don, are you saying that a type 4 plane is rare/valuable?

-- I'm strictly hand-tool only...unless the power tool is faster and easier!

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