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New Woodworker With Questions About A Craftsman 113.298240 Table Saw

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Forum topic by Targa posted 09-05-2013 07:08 PM 3244 views 0 times favorited 43 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Targa

102 posts in 429 days


09-05-2013 07:08 PM

I’m just getting started in woodworking and have some questions about the craftsman table saw I recently acquired for free from my neighbor.

The saw is model #113.298240 and is in pretty good condition. It has the original rip fence, which I know isn’t very good, and has a belt drive dual voltage (7/14 amp) ball bearing motor which runs well.

I’d love to have a 3HP cabinet saw, but since I need to purchase other basic machines I want to try to utilize this free saw if I can, at least until I build some things for my wife and she says ok to upgrade.

In any event, here’s a few things I’m thinking of doing in order to more effectively use this saw

- Install an aftermarket rip fence, the brand/model is yet to be determined (suggestions would be appreciated)
- Install a link belt with machined pulleys to reduce noise and vibration
- It came without a blade guard so I’m ordering a used original one off of EBay

I’ve already purchased a new Diablo rip blade and Diablo combination blade as well as a mobile saw base.

I have tried to make sure the blade can be adjusted to 90 degrees to the cast iron center table which it is.

However, when measuring the relationship of the blade to the miter gauge slots in the table top the blade is off .015. I’ve tried to adjust the trunnion assembly but it not very easy to get it perfect. Seems as though once you tighten the bolts holding it to the cast iron top, it move slightly.

So now I have a couple of questions about what I’ve described.

1. Is this saw worth investing in a aftermarket fence?

2. Will a link belt and machined pulleys make a noticeable difference?

3. Is having the blade .015 out of parallel with the miter slots too much? Will it only effect crosscuts?

4. Since the motor is only rated at 1hp, can I effectively cut thicker wood by cutting half way thru one side then flipping it over to cut the other to complete the cut? Or simply raise the blade incrementally?

Btw, I do plan to pick up a 6” jointer which I think could true up the double sided cut I just described.

I would appreciate any comments or suggestions.

Thank you

-- Dom


43 replies so far

View toolie's profile

toolie

1769 posts in 1318 days


#1 posted 09-05-2013 09:11 PM

1. Is this saw worth investing in a aftermarket fence?

IMHO, absolutely. a delta t2 or a vega 40 will greatly enhance it’s level of precision.

2. Will a link belt and machined pulleys make a noticeable difference?

yes, but i’d check the existing pulleys for coplanarity first. even with machined pulleys adn a link belt, pulleys that are non-coplanar can generatea significant amount of vibration.

3. Is having the blade .015 out of parallel with the miter slots too much? Will it only effect crosscuts?

IMHO, yes, it’s too much. if the blade is nearer to the miter slot at the outfeed side of the blade, it could result in kickback as the work piece is pinched between the fence and the blade as the work piece is fed through the blade.. the arrangement that hold the trunions to the underside of the table is a simple one. i have two similar (113 series) saws, one a c-man and the other a ridgid. a little patience can result in the blade (or arbor flange) being dead parallel to the miter slot:

infeed side of blade:

outfeed side of blade:

the key is to loosen the trunion bolts just enough , with one of the front corner trunion bolts jjuusstt loose enough to act as a pivot point for the trunion assembly. once the rear trunion is tapped left or right into alignment, careful and slow “star pattern” tightening of the bolts will affix the trunion in place.

4. Since the motor is only rated at 1hp, can I effectively cut thicker wood by cutting half way thru one side then flipping it over to cut the other to complete the cut? Or simply raise the blade incrementally?

with the proper ripping blade(sharp carbide teeth, aggressive hook angle and 24 or fewer teeth), that saw will rip 8/4 hardwoods in a single pass. at least mine will. you can’t shove it through like you would on a 3hp cabinet saw, but with a properly modulated feed rate, that saw will handle almost anything a hobbyist will encounter. and, if raising the blade to complete a cut, be sure to use a featherboard to keep the work piece firmly against the fence.

hope this helps.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

View Targa's profile

Targa

102 posts in 429 days


#2 posted 09-06-2013 12:16 AM

toolie,

thanks for your comments they are very helpful. I’ll give adjusting the trunnion another try over the weekend to see if I can get the blade to be parallel with the miter slot.

Btw, when I did some searching recently for a Delta T2 fence, they seem unavailable everywhere I looked?

-- Dom

View Don Broussard's profile

Don Broussard

2033 posts in 941 days


#3 posted 09-06-2013 12:20 AM

@Targa—+1 to toolie’s comments. He knows what he’s talking about re: C’man 113 saw rehabs. That is a good saw. I also did one over a year ago, and I put the link belt on it with the factory pulleys. It’s smooth and pulls well. If you can get cast iron wings, that will get you a little extra weight for stability. I put the Delta T2 on mine too. Good luck finding one—you might luck out finding the same or a similar saw for sale and get a better fence as part of the deal.

-- People say I hammer like lightning. It's not that I'm fast -- it's that I never hit the same place twice!

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

5516 posts in 2065 days


#4 posted 09-06-2013 12:38 AM

The fence is definitely worth an upgrade.

Get the alignment within +/-0.003” if you can. 0.15” is too much.

I’d hold off on the link belt and pulleys until you see if you need them. Replacing a belt and pulleys that are working great won’t make much difference, but if they’re the cause of any vibration, then a link belt could help. When and if you decide, I’d try the belt first, and only add the pulleys if needed.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View tefinn's profile

tefinn

1215 posts in 1127 days


#5 posted 09-06-2013 01:18 AM

I also have a 113 Craftsman saw I bought new in ‘82. Mine has the CI webbed wings and the 1 1/2hp motor. I can rip 8/4 stock with ease. The only modification I’ve done is a link belt from HF. Follow toolie’s instructions for setting the trunions and you can really dial the blade in. I’ve made do with the original fence for so long, I have no problems with it at all. You learn to adapt to the fence inconsistencies over time. Lol.

Btw, when I did some searching recently for a Delta T2 fence, they seem unavailable everywhere I looked?

This seems to be the norm lately. The new owners of Delta, for whatever reason, are having problems. Nobody knows exactly what, but there are no tools or parts getting to the market. Even the eBay market for T2’s has dried up because of the demand!

-- Tom Finnigan - Measures? We don't need no stinking measures! - Hmm, maybe thats why my project pieces don't fit.

View toolie's profile

toolie

1769 posts in 1318 days


#6 posted 09-06-2013 01:46 AM

if t2s are too hard to come by, the vega 40 also gets good reviews:

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=vega%2040%20table%20saw%20fence

also, don’t overlook these OEM fence systems.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Craftsman-Professional-Align-A-Rp-24-12-Rip-Fence-System-for-table-saw-/161080425164?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2581243acc

i have a similar one on a ridgid 2412 and it’s every bit as accurate and reliable as the delta t2 on my 113 series c-man. it’s not a t-square fence, but when properly dialed in, it’ll do everything the t2 will do AND, the rails can be shifted to the right for greater right of blade rip capacity very easily. it renders the front rail tape measure useless, but that’s a small price to pay for the added rip capacity.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

View Targa's profile

Targa

102 posts in 429 days


#7 posted 09-07-2013 05:45 PM

I made some progress aligning my table saw blade to the miter slot. Using toolie’s suggested approach I was able to get the infeed side of the blade to within .002 of the outfeed side of the blade.

Instead of rigging up my dial indicator somehow and taking much more time, I made a quick jig (pictures are hopefully attached) that utilizes measuring the relationship of the end of a screw and a tooth on the saw blade with a feeler gauge. I marked one tooth rotating it 180 degrees to measure the infeed and outfeed sides. Its not pretty, but it’s adjustable and works pretty well. Some day after I get my shop up and running I’ll make something more elaborate. Btw, I’m not used to Photobucket so the pictures may not be correct.

Patent pending. lol

-- Dom

View Targa's profile

Targa

102 posts in 429 days


#8 posted 09-10-2013 02:50 PM

I was looking on EBay as well as the Grizzly and Amazon web sites for Table Saw fences to upgrade my original craftsman fence.

I saw the Shop Fox W1410 fence which looks similar in design with the Craftsman-Professional-Align-A-Rip fence toolie suggested for consideration as a alternative to the more expensive T2 and Vega 40 fences.

Grizzly has it on sale at $152.95 + $16.95 shipping with no sales tax which looks like a pretty good deal.

One question about fences is whether having a longer T Square type design that extends past the back edge of the saw’s table is better than one that clamps at both ends but is only the length of the saw’s table like the W1410?

Anyone have any experience or opinion on whether this is also a good fence to consider?

Thank you

-- Dom

View dschlic1's profile

dschlic1

179 posts in 659 days


#9 posted 09-10-2013 04:54 PM

I also have a 113 Craftsman table saw. Mine had the OEM micro adjust fence. The fence when properly setup worked will. However moving it was difficult and the fence length is very short. I managed to purchase a Vega pro 40 on Ebay for $160 and have never looked back. The longer fence produces much smoother and straighter cuts.

A tip for adjusting the trunions. I loosen the bolts on the trunion and then move it using a bar clamp. I adjust the clamp to zero out the deflection and then tighten the trunion bolts.

View toolie's profile

toolie

1769 posts in 1318 days


#10 posted 09-11-2013 02:46 AM

looks like a nice fence, but i wonder about the bearing surfaces against which the fence registers. it looks like the fence rests against the thin edge of a length of angle iron. just not sure if that’s enough surface area for the fence.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

View Targa's profile

Targa

102 posts in 429 days


#11 posted 09-20-2013 04:33 PM

I have a lead on a new Biesemeyer model 78-902 42” fence and wonder whether it too would be a reasonable fence to consider for replacing my stock fence on my 113 craftsman table saw?

Have not been able to find many reviews of it. Is it an oddball or one that is less desirable than a Delta T2 or Vega 40?

-- Dom

View tefinn's profile

tefinn

1215 posts in 1127 days


#12 posted 09-20-2013 04:55 PM

The Delta T2 and Vega 40 are based on the Biesemyer fence. Biesmeyer was owned by Delta. I don’t know if it still is after the sale of Delta by B&D to Chang Type Industrial. Any of those fences would be great to have.

-- Tom Finnigan - Measures? We don't need no stinking measures! - Hmm, maybe thats why my project pieces don't fit.

View toolie's profile

toolie

1769 posts in 1318 days


#13 posted 09-21-2013 12:09 AM

Is it an oddball

doesn’t appear to be:

http://www.deltamachinery.com/accessories/biesemeyer/item/78-902

looks like a nice unit. i assume the one you’re chasing also comes with the fence rails? looks like it will work just like a t2 will. here’s a good article i found on mounting a delta tsquare to a c-man contractor saw:

http://www.instructables.com/id/Retrofitting-A-Delta-T2-Fence-to-a-Craftsman-Table/#step1

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

5516 posts in 2065 days


#14 posted 09-21-2013 10:52 AM

Toolie asked the same question I had….does that Biese come with rails? It’s a great fence at the right price, but it will need rails to function.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View tefinn's profile

tefinn

1215 posts in 1127 days


#15 posted 09-21-2013 11:10 AM

Amazon has them for sale, but they’re sold seperatly. $209.12 for the fence from Amazon and 139.95 for the rails from Grizzly. The fence price is the best I could find anywhere.

http://www.amazon.com/DELTA-78-902-42-Inch-Table-Fence/dp/B0006OHG48/ref=pd_bxgy_hi_text_y

http://www.amazon.com/Biesemeyer-78-130-Delta-Table-Guide/dp/B000RFPJSQ/ref=pd_bxgy_hi_text_y

-- Tom Finnigan - Measures? We don't need no stinking measures! - Hmm, maybe thats why my project pieces don't fit.

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