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Forum topic by DrPuk2U posted 09-02-2013 09:43 PM 874 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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DrPuk2U

49 posts in 1016 days


09-02-2013 09:43 PM

Topic tags/keywords: large boards joint plane four-square

I am making a entry hall bench. The wood is poplar since my wife wants to paint it when it is done.

I have a nice 8 foot piece 11” wide and 6/4 thick. Ultimately, I need a 4 foot by 20” piece for the bench’s top. My problem is that the 11” board isn’t finished though it’s pretty square. I have an 8” jointer and a 13” planner. Clearly, I can’t joint a 11” piece so it SEEMS like the best approach is to cut the 8 foot board into two four-foot lengths, rip the 11” pieces into four four-foot 5.5” boards and joint and plane them four-square, then edge join the four boards to form the top. Seems a shame to have to rip the big board only to edge-join it back, but can’t see a better way.

Am I missing something or is this the right strategy?

-- Ric, N. Illinois "Design thrice, measure twice, cut once... slap forehead, start over"


14 replies so far

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

2963 posts in 1010 days


#1 posted 09-02-2013 09:51 PM

I’m assuming the 4’ length is a rough estimate, or the slab has really good ends.
I’d edge joint one side, rip it in half, (2-4’ x 11” pieces). Plane them. then glue them up.
Cut your final dimensions when dry and finish.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View Don W's profile

Don W

15430 posts in 1291 days


#2 posted 09-02-2013 09:57 PM

ditto what Russell wrote.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

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DrPuk2U

49 posts in 1016 days


#3 posted 09-03-2013 02:32 PM

The piece is a little over 8 feet, but I need only 42” finished so no issue there. Ah, so you’re suggesting that cut it down to two four-foot pieces then plane both sides? I am not an expert with a smoothing plane (and don’t own a jointer plane). But maybe this is a chance to rectify both… ;-)

-- Ric, N. Illinois "Design thrice, measure twice, cut once... slap forehead, start over"

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RussellAP

2963 posts in 1010 days


#4 posted 09-03-2013 03:33 PM

I was thinking DeWalt planer myself. There is nothing wrong with hand planes, but it’s more involved than they will tell you. You need a bench that is very very heavy or attached to something solid for one. I only use a hand plane when I have to.
I also only use a jointer to smooth the side grain of a board. I don’t use it for planing the face, one let up of pressure can ruin a board. I like a dedicated planer. Better figure in DC if you don’t have a way to open a door and let out the chips. The only tool worse than a lathe is a planer for chips.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

3515 posts in 1537 days


#5 posted 09-03-2013 03:43 PM

I have the same setup you do, 8” jointer / 13” planer. I joint 8” of the board, then flip it over and send it through the planer on a sled (nothing more than a strip of plywood with a cleat attached). The jointed surface sits flat on the plywood sled. The remaining 3” of rough board hangs over the side of the sled. Planing will establish one flat face. Then remove the sled, and plane the opposite side as usual.

It works great, and no need to rip up those wide boards.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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DrPuk2U

49 posts in 1016 days


#6 posted 09-03-2013 05:21 PM

Willie, That’s a pretty clever idea. I may give that a try. Of course, there is at least one down side and that is that in order to joint the first 8” of the board you have to remove the guard on the jointer…

-- Ric, N. Illinois "Design thrice, measure twice, cut once... slap forehead, start over"

View Randy_ATX's profile

Randy_ATX

689 posts in 1166 days


#7 posted 09-03-2013 05:30 PM

Something else to consider – I always get some planner snipe no matter what, so I have to leave my rough boards a couple inches longer on both ends. (You mentioned cutting to 4’ and then planning, might work for others, but doesn’t for me.) After jointing and planning I then trim to final dimension for the total length of the board needed. Learned this the hard way.

-- Randy -- Austin, TX by way of Northwest (Woodville), OH

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6960 posts in 1638 days


#8 posted 09-03-2013 05:38 PM

I have jointed 11in boards on my 8in jointer, with success. I remove the blade guard, run the board through, rotate the board 180* same side down, and run again. Repeat as needed.

THEN, I put the board on my WB with dogs and vise. Now you have a choice as to which hand plane to use. I have used #4 and #6 Sargents with great results with either. Set up your HP to just take the thinnest slivers and plane off that ridge of ~1/32in on the one side/width that the jointer couldn’t reach. It comes off easily, and to be honest, you may not even have to run that side through the planer because it can/will look that good.

My 2-cents

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View joeyinsouthaustin's profile

joeyinsouthaustin

1285 posts in 796 days


#9 posted 09-03-2013 09:06 PM

Seems a shame to have to rip the big board only to edge-join it back, but can’t see a better way.

Done right and it will be more stable for paint than the 11” wide board. Imo boards that wide are handy but even poplar is prone to cupping, although as a bench seat there might be a lot to keep it flat, depending on design.

-- Who is John Galt?

View teejk's profile

teejk

1215 posts in 1408 days


#10 posted 09-03-2013 10:56 PM

I’m too lazy to research it on my own…but back before machines, was it strictly a draw-knife that flattened a board?

I got a pile of cherry from Eberly a few weeks ago and they are pretty wide. Those boards are so pretty that I cringe on the thought of ripping them down to put them back together (loss of the natural grain lines is my biggest fear…they are that pretty).

I have a 13” planer but only the Delta 6” jointer. I’ll experiment with one or two on the planer with VERY shallow passes but my experience is that it is like playing “whack a mole”.

And as long as I am on the subject, would a wide cast iron bed planer substitute for a wider jointer? Or does the “sled” mentioned above get me close enough?

View Tim's profile

Tim

1332 posts in 685 days


#11 posted 09-03-2013 11:53 PM

I think I’ve read hand planes have been around since the Egyptians, teejk. If not, they have been around for a long time and were used to flatten boards.

But you can definitely make a sled with shims to flatten a wide board on a planer. There’s lots of youtube videos on it and I’m sure it’s covered in detail here on LJs somewhere.

View Shawn Masterson's profile

Shawn Masterson

1262 posts in 672 days


#12 posted 09-03-2013 11:59 PM

just my opinion. stop face jointing there is no need to if the board is flat. if it is not flat then get another board. I would do a glue up since it is painted.

View teejk's profile

teejk

1215 posts in 1408 days


#13 posted 09-04-2013 01:44 AM

Shawn…with the “lunch box” planers we mostly use, there is a lot of “spring” on those tables. I’ll experiment again with light passes though. When I deal with cherry I prize the planer shavings for meat smoking almost as much as I prize the lumber. And I have seem to have converted a number of people that keep wondering when I am going to make some more cherry stuff.

I would like to get an industrial machine in my amateur shop that would make the process easier though. I really don’t use the jointer that much and wonder whether a “real” planer can make a flat board.

View Shawn Masterson's profile

Shawn Masterson

1262 posts in 672 days


#14 posted 09-04-2013 12:04 PM

the rollers will flatten the board as it goes through. if it was cupped or twisted it will most likely come out the same it went in. I work with material from a local sawyer so it is cheap. If I have a bad board it goes in the fire pile. The way I see it if it twisted once it will twist again.

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