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glue clean-up

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Forum topic by trz posted 325 days ago 806 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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trz

65 posts in 1083 days


325 days ago

So, I’ve just discovered that many months ago when I glued up this case I failed to clean-up all the glue squeeze out. (titebond yellow glue). Any way to remove some of it before the sanding begins? I’m afraid trying to sand it in these areas is going to make things worse. Maybe even wear thru the veneered plywood.

HELP.

Ooops, how do I add pics? never mind.


20 replies so far

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6914 posts in 1511 days


#1 posted 325 days ago

Carefully use a chisel or chisel plane to essentially scrape/cut away the excess. It is easy to over-do this and mar your joint with divots, so be careful. It is probably too late for a scraper, if the glue has set and hardened over ~24hr or so. BTW, sanding alone will gum up the glue in the joint and most likely sand away material in the area that is NOT glued.

Good luck.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View StumpyNubs's profile

StumpyNubs

6116 posts in 1397 days


#2 posted 325 days ago

Put the drawer in and pretend it’s not there. Nobody’s going to see it and if you send me $100 I won’t tell anyone ;)

-- It's the best woodworking show since the invention of wood... New episodes at: http://www.stumpynubs.com

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HorizontalMike

6914 posts in 1511 days


#3 posted 325 days ago

Now that I see you have added a picture, I agree with Stumpy.

Fuhgeddaboudit… ;-)

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View GarageWoodworks's profile

GarageWoodworks

419 posts in 753 days


#4 posted 325 days ago

On something like that (especially when ply is involved w delicate veneer) I would have pre-finished. Most finishes make glue removal much easier.

An alternative would have been to use something called WaxiLit. It’s a soft wax that you apply near the glue region and once dried no glue will adhere to it. Unfortunately, LeeValley (where I use to buy it) stopped selling it. Their are other vendors that sell it but most I have seen sell it in very large quantities.

-- Subscribe on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/GarageWoodworks?feature=guide

View teejk's profile

teejk

1206 posts in 1281 days


#5 posted 325 days ago

I’ll beat stumpy and only charge you $50 to not tell anybody (seems that only the person that built it knows where the flaws are).

If it bugs you big time, get it as clean as you can with chisels, razor knife, whatever. Stain whatever is untainted by glue, then find a close match on gel-stain to cover the glue joints (that is more like a paint than a stain).

View Shawn Masterson's profile

Shawn Masterson

1240 posts in 545 days


#6 posted 325 days ago

just take a sharp chisel and gently scrape it off.

View jimr1cos's profile

jimr1cos

12 posts in 483 days


#7 posted 325 days ago

I recently corrected a similar problem by using a paint pencil (dry) after some gentle chisel work. The final satin poly finish blended everything nicely.
Jim

View trz's profile

trz

65 posts in 1083 days


#8 posted 324 days ago

So, for those of you who suggested I just stick the drawer in and pretend the problem doesn’t exist , That’s not exceptable and I thinik it’s poor advice especially for any new woodworkers who might be on LJ looking to learn from the rest of us. To those of you who gave me “real” advice , Thank you.

Here’s what I did . Very very sparingly dabbed on some acetone on the dried glue and then after sharpening my chisel I left the burr on it and used it as a scraper and gently scraped off the old glue. Worked great.
thanks again to those of you who tried to help.

View scotsman9's profile

scotsman9

134 posts in 485 days


#9 posted 324 days ago

Francis?????

-- Just a man and his opinion.

View StumpyNubs's profile

StumpyNubs

6116 posts in 1397 days


#10 posted 324 days ago

trz- ”Poor advice”??? Give me a break! Did you sand the bottom of the cabinet the same way you sand the rest? Do you intentionally put the “non-show” side of the plywood down when you cut on the table saw because any tearout won’t be visible? Have you ever used a lesser wood for the drawer bottoms than you did for the face? Do you cut half blind dovetails on the back of drawers just like you do on the visible front? Have you ever turned the less than perfect side of a board around to conceal that knot?

I’ve studies pieces by woodworking masters none of us will ever match, and you will see loads of places instances where the left a little squeeze-out here, a few tool marks there, a compromise or two… or three, where it will not normally be seen. You can say I give bad advice- I am clearly no master. But if Townsend or Goddard or Chippendale were alive today, I wonder how they would have answered your question?

Perhaps new woodworkers should avoid studying the work of the masters less they get bad advice. :)

-- It's the best woodworking show since the invention of wood... New episodes at: http://www.stumpynubs.com

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trz

65 posts in 1083 days


#11 posted 324 days ago

Stumpy You’re right I think we all practice the things you talk about in your first paragraph, In you’re second paragraph I guess the Operative phrase is ‘a LITTLE squeeze-out here , a FEW tool marks there’. Which is purely an individual standard we each set for ourselves. The squeeze-out I showed on my project was clearly more than what my quality standards are for Myself, that is why I asked how to repair it. I’m just saying that as fellow woodworkers here we should try and teach how to repair mistakes rather than just hide them. Hiding them is One option but , there are ways to repair mistakes too.

View teejk's profile

teejk

1206 posts in 1281 days


#12 posted 324 days ago

Nobody told you to ignore it, rather just offered practical advice. Be careful with the acetone…if it cleaned up the joint that nobody will see, it might have gotten into the joint where you wanted the glue. You are correct though in that it was a bit messy and hopefully you have learned from the experience. To get that much squeeze out indicates a loose joint (1/2 ply isn’t 1/2 anymore so the quality dado makers have for years included a “thin” cutter and shims in the set) or too much glue.

And maybe I am just getting lazy but I “finish sand” all panels before I assemble them. It’s a PITA (actually next to impossible) to properly sand any 90 deg corner and even the parts you can see are much easier to sand on a flat surface.. I keep a wet rag handy on the glue-up stage.

View StumpyNubs's profile

StumpyNubs

6116 posts in 1397 days


#13 posted 324 days ago

trz- Absolutely, if you feel like you should clean it up, you should do it! I personally would leave it, but then again I also like to put through dovetails on my drawer backs while most woodworkers rabbet them on. We all have our own standards when it comes to parts of the project that rarely or never get seen.

I only thought it was a little over the top to say that those who suggesting you leave it were giving bad advice to new woodworkers.

Maybe neither one of us phrased our comments right. It’s all good :)

-- It's the best woodworking show since the invention of wood... New episodes at: http://www.stumpynubs.com

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trz

65 posts in 1083 days


#14 posted 324 days ago

TeeJK To get that much squeeze out indicates a loose joint actually it’s not squeeze out , it’s smeared glue from when I was trying to fit the panels together. It’s 3/4” plywood and the dado was cut with a 23/32 router bit.

View teejk's profile

teejk

1206 posts in 1281 days


#15 posted 324 days ago

ok trz…I am not a “master” but have built a lot of cabinets so take this or dismiss it.

Plywood dados…Hit the dado with glue making sure nothing comes onto the exposed skin. Brush it in (plumbers “flux brushes” work great for that and they are cheap). Let it sit to absorb. Then do the same to the horizontal panel edges (you have a little more leeway there because of the depth of the dado). After a few minutes, a LIGHT coat of glue in the dado then assemble.

I think many people over apply glue…modern glues are much the same as contact cement…no need for a wet dripping glue surface IMHO…you may think it is a dry joint but put a clamp on it and you’ll see the results…I aim for little tiny “dots” that are easy to knock off with a razor knife when dry. Titebond II has a much shorter open time than yellow glues but I think it is still 20 minutes or so before the chemical bonding reaction starts.

And as noted above, I aim for little or no sanding on the assembled box so I finish sand the flat panels before I start assembly.

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