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Forum topic by Charlie posted 335 days ago 731 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Charlie

1001 posts in 889 days


335 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: question

Finishing? Lumber? .... anyways…

I have a piece of 3/4” thick cherry, 2 inches wide and 28 inches long. It was so pretty when I got it done I just HAD to oil it. This is a part of my easel and the finish will simply be linseed oil. Yes, I’ve read all the discussions about linseed oil. I have decided that for this particular piece, it just makes sense.

Anyways….
I have to stick some 1-1/2×2 pieces of 16th inch cork sheet on the ends. What are the chances it’ll stick to oiled cherry? :)

Should I scrub the end with some mineral spirits or just let the oil dry a few days and stick the cork on? The cork is on a peel-n-stick sheet.

My other option is to forget the cork, and to shave about 1/16 out of the center, leaving the ends full thickness for about an inch and a half. Not sure the best way to do that, but probably a router and guides. I know it would take me longer to set up than it would to actually do it. :)

So… thoughts on sticking the cork to the cherry that I’ve oiled?


13 replies so far

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112001 posts in 2180 days


#1 posted 335 days ago

I would make sure Linseed oil is dry (takes about 2 years :)) and do a test to see how well it sticks and then if you have to do a slight trim on the ends go for it and then you should have no problem with it sticking.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Charlie's profile

Charlie

1001 posts in 889 days


#2 posted 335 days ago

Hehehehe…. kinda what I figured. Oh well. It’s a piece that’s real easy to remake. Just a straight board with 2 holes in it. I’ll try just hitting the ends with a sanding block first and see if that gets me enough grip.

Oh I just came up with another idea that would probably work. I can cut 1-1/2” wide sections out of an old bicycle inner tube and just slip them over the ends. This is a piece that acts like a clamp when you tighten 2 star knobs in the front of the easel. The “clamp board” is actually on the backside of the easel and doesn’t show unless you walk around back to see the inner workings. This is my “frame-within-a-frame” sliding easel and the “clamp board” has to span the width of the back, and clamp onto the outer frame to keep the inner frame from moving.

The cork would seem a more elegant solution if I can get it to work, but the inner tube sections is also perfectly acceptable given the task at hand.

And this is an easel and I have to keep telling myself it isn’t furniture. But the cherry is so darn pretty! hehehhe

OH! And on my NEXT one…. assuming I build another to sell, I’ll simply run the inner frame stiles through the planer an extra time of 2 and make them slightly thinner than the outer frame and then I won’t need to do anything at all as a flat board would work all by itself. :)

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

2857 posts in 1090 days


#3 posted 335 days ago

A1Jim has the right idea, except you are using peel and stick?
I would scrub the pieces that have oil on them with Lacquer thinner or Acetone. Another alternative is to use BrakeKleen, It leaves no residue, but might affect you gluing.
Get rid of the peel and stick and actually do your due diligence, gluing it correctly in the first place.

This is just my pair ‘o pennies worth.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

View Charlie's profile

Charlie

1001 posts in 889 days


#4 posted 335 days ago

Dallas,
There are lots of different kinds of peel-n-stick. ;)
This has a pretty aggressive adhesive on it. It ain’t like dollar store stuff. I used it inside the electronics compartments of all-electric radio controlled airplanes and stuck it to the microply innards and it peels the plywood apart if you try to remove it.

I’ll try some solvent and a light sanding. If that doesn’t do it, then I’ll try plan B. :)

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112001 posts in 2180 days


#5 posted 334 days ago

Good approach Dallas ,the only concern I had using lacquer thinner or Acetone was it dripping on the areas that Charlie doesn’t want finish removed from. I agree that peel and stick is not always the best alternative,good old contact cement
works well.
I was wondering if you have any experience finishing over areas you have cleaned with BrakeKleen ,is it possible it’s nothing more than naphtha ?

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

2857 posts in 1090 days


#6 posted 334 days ago

Charlie, I was thinking of the repeated contact that happens with cork. I wasn’t meaning cheap vs well made.
I made a bulletin board for my old church. I used high quality stick on stuff and cleaned the wood really well before I applied it, (mfg’s directions).
Within 6 months it had edges coming up for some reason.
We sent a sample to the mfg., (right close by), and they couldn’t determine what was wrong except maybe repeated rubbing over the cork surface might have caused an effect like petting a cat….

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

View Charlie's profile

Charlie

1001 posts in 889 days


#7 posted 334 days ago

Dallas,
Yeah I’m kinda wondering how this is going to work as well as the cork is going to be sliding on a stile when it’s loosened. It’s possible it will roll off of its backing. I might actually be better off with wood-on-wood…. or with the inner tube sections :)

Or I could cut a couple of 1/8” thick aluminum “pads” and recess them about 1/16 so they’re proud about 1/16.

Like I said… easy piece to make and it is easily changeable. I might make an extra or 2 tomorrow just to try different things on.

View mummykicks's profile

mummykicks

56 posts in 405 days


#8 posted 334 days ago

I was thinking that you could shellac the ends, then glue the cork once the shellac has dried. Might take a couple of coats, but in theory that’s what shellac is supposed to be good for right?

View Richforever's profile

Richforever

739 posts in 2323 days


#9 posted 334 days ago

Another idea: brush wood glue on the ends and let it dry. It will make a hard surface for the peel-and-stick to stick to.

-- Rich, Seattle, WA

View Hammerthumb's profile

Hammerthumb

1124 posts in 578 days


#10 posted 334 days ago

mummykicks has a good idea. You can apply shellac over the linseed oil even if it has not fully cured. The cork will stick to that. Or a better idea than the aluminum strips is to use brass. Sound like ths is supposed to work like a bushing?

-- Paul, Las Vegas

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Charlie

1001 posts in 889 days


#11 posted 334 days ago

Not really a bushing… this is harder to explain than I thought…

Pictures are in order.
From the front. The entire piece is the rectangular one that looks like it might be walnut in this photo (not my easel, just photos of example builds)

Remember…. 2 frames. The rectangular front piece is secured to the inner frame. It is through bolted. See the star knobs? When you tighten those, it’s supposed to pinch the outer frame between the rectangular front piece and the back “clamp board” I’ve been talking about.
Another picture from the back this time…

See the board across the back? That’s the “clamp board” as I’m calling it.

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

2857 posts in 1090 days


#12 posted 334 days ago

I see said the blind man to his deaf wife!

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

View Charlie's profile

Charlie

1001 posts in 889 days


#13 posted 334 days ago

OK… well… I guess this is all moot. I just assembled the pieces onto the frame and it does what it’s supposed to do without me having to do anything.

So…. uhhhh…. nothing to see here, citizens. Please carry on about your business….

:)

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