LumberJocks

Bench dog question

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by MaroonGoon posted 08-26-2013 11:16 PM 903 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View MaroonGoon's profile

MaroonGoon

280 posts in 614 days


08-26-2013 11:16 PM

Ok fellas I’ve been thinking this over all day and I want to know what y’all think about it. I am about to make the holes for my bench dogs in my new bench top. I have decided I will drill 3/4” holes for my bench dogs to go in. I was going to buy 3/4 inch dowels and make my bench dogs out of that but then I thought, why can’t I just buy 3/4” diameter bolts and use those as my bench dogs? I know they will be exactly 3/4” wide so they won’t jiggle around and the head will prevent it from falling all the way through. Also since the head is a hexagon I will have a flat edge on my bench dog to rest against my work piece and keep my work piece from slipping around it. It sounds simple and effective but I haven’t heard of anyone using them..also is there a general rule of thumb for bench dog placement? I know I need one in front of my vise but what works best for you more experienced woodworkers? Dogs evenly spaced 2” from the edge?

Thanks,
Maroon

-- "Only put off until tomorrow what you are willing to die having left undone." -- Pablo Picasso


9 replies so far

View Don W's profile

Don W

15030 posts in 1223 days


#1 posted 08-26-2013 11:25 PM

spacing depend son the vice. Space them a little less than the vice depth.

I’ve used 3/4” bolts, but the metal scares me. I always made my own until I bought these.

bought them because of a review here, they are great.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View ksSlim's profile

ksSlim

984 posts in 1546 days


#2 posted 08-26-2013 11:57 PM

+1 on what Don said. Metal and cutting tools, ie: planes are not a good mix.
You can however, in a pinch, use whatever will fit in the hole.

Google “plane stops” should get at least 14 different way to make one.

-- Sawdust and shavings are therapeutic

View Bluepine38's profile

Bluepine38

2876 posts in 1741 days


#3 posted 08-27-2013 03:39 PM

Many bolts are now made with rolled threads, not cut threads. When they roll them the dies press a groove
in the bolt, and also raise some metal up to form the peak of the thread, this means that the shoulder or
unthreaded part of the bolt will be less than 3/4”. Not trying to nit pick, but just thought you should know.

-- As ever, Gus-the 75 yr young apprentice carpenter

View Bill White's profile (online now)

Bill White

3455 posts in 2616 days


#4 posted 08-27-2013 04:48 PM

I use the dogs that are sold with and for the Black and Decker Workmate. They are excellent alternates for wood or metal dogs, hold tight, don’t harm the workpiece or the planes, and are inexpensive.
Might wanna check ‘em out.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View JayT's profile

JayT

2277 posts in 867 days


#5 posted 08-27-2013 04:56 PM

+1 on the Kreg bench dogs.

is there a general rule of thumb for bench dog placement?

Just make sure spacing is less than your vise travel and not so close together you make a Swiss cheese bench. I usually see somewhere in the 3”-4” range for spacing. As far as distance from the front, it seems to be generally agreed that closer is better. Get them too far back and working narrow stock becomes difficult.

-- "The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public's money." Alexis de Tocqueville, 1835

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6819 posts in 1807 days


#6 posted 08-27-2013 05:06 PM

I’m not sure about the bolts, the steel is scary. I like wood dogs when you will be coming dangerously close to them with plane irons.

However I do love my Veritas Brass dogs because they have a texture that grips like crazy but it’s still made out of a soft metal. Hitting one will do more damage to the dog than to your steel blades. I know, Ive done it. Lol.

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View MaroonGoon's profile

MaroonGoon

280 posts in 614 days


#7 posted 08-27-2013 05:57 PM

Thanks guys, I’ll look into those options.

Makes sense about the metal vs. metal. I could say that I would be careful and not make contact with the dogs, but I would just be eating my words once (eventually) I chipped a plane blade :-/

-- "Only put off until tomorrow what you are willing to die having left undone." -- Pablo Picasso

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6819 posts in 1807 days


#8 posted 08-27-2013 06:00 PM

But hey, plenty of steel dogs were used back in the days, it can work.

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View BigRedKnothead's profile (online now)

BigRedKnothead

4997 posts in 638 days


#9 posted 08-27-2013 06:57 PM

Not only can metal dogs be harmful for your tools, they dent the wood. All preference of course. A fellow LJ made these dogs for me. I love em. Don’t under estimate the convenience of a spring-loaded dog that stays in the hole. Just push it up or down when you need. No moving them around.
Pretty easy and cheap to make:

-- Red -- "That the powerful play goes on, and you may contribute a verse." W. Whitman

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase