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Forum topic by rrdesigns posted 08-26-2013 06:22 PM 768 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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rrdesigns

494 posts in 1844 days


08-26-2013 06:22 PM

I have a client who wants some massive legs created for a bar top extension. He is talking 12-16” in diameter and 40” tall. I have a Laguna 18-47 lathe which is heavily weighted down and should be able to handle the size but I don’t know if the mass would be too much for it. I have never turned anything that large and have no idea what these pieces would weigh. I’m looking for input on species selection, whether to try and find solid stock for this or do a glue-up and a heads up on all the things that can go wrong if I take on this project.

-- Beth, Oklahoma, Rambling Road Designs


14 replies so far

View joeyinsouthaustin's profile

joeyinsouthaustin

1256 posts in 730 days


#1 posted 08-26-2013 06:25 PM

I only have experience installing such items sourced from others, and they all seem to be segmented turnings. Maybe that is a direction to go to handle the mass??

-- Who is John Galt?

View REO's profile

REO

614 posts in 732 days


#2 posted 08-26-2013 06:35 PM

solid blanks will check. they will be heavy regardless of species. you will need to take off as much excess of the corners as you can to swing them. square 12” blank is 16+ inches and a 16 inch blank is 22 1/2” across the flats. dont get in a hurry. make sure you have good glue joints. Even at slow speeds if a chunk of this comes loose it’ll leave a mark. You will be sanding a while LOL.

View Loco's profile

Loco

210 posts in 407 days


#3 posted 08-26-2013 06:58 PM

If there’s a sawmill in state they could take a log, fire up the BIG BANDSAW and cut you an octagon.
Show it to the client. He might like it as is. If not. All ya have to do is chuck it up and turn it. At least you’ll be starting with something consistent.

-- What day is it ? No matter. Ummmm What month is it ? No moron. I paid for a 2 x 6. That means Two inches by six inches. I want the rest of my wood.

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

3457 posts in 2618 days


#4 posted 08-26-2013 07:09 PM

Just contact Osborne Wood Products in Georgia.
They can do just about any turning ya might need for far less than ya can do it.
I have noooo connection other than being a satisfied customer.
You won’t be unhappy.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

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REO

614 posts in 732 days


#5 posted 08-26-2013 07:27 PM

The OP wanted to do them on his own. if you do decide to hire them out PM me.

View REO's profile

REO

614 posts in 732 days


#6 posted 09-01-2013 01:57 AM

anything new on this?

View rrdesigns's profile

rrdesigns

494 posts in 1844 days


#7 posted 09-01-2013 03:37 AM

The client is consulting an engineer to determine the best size for this project. The granite slab these legs need to support is going to weigh a lot and he wants to make sure he gets it right. I found a sawmill with blanks large enough to turn them out of. Just waiting now.

-- Beth, Oklahoma, Rambling Road Designs

View Charlie's profile

Charlie

1017 posts in 944 days


#8 posted 09-01-2013 10:52 AM

I’m not a turner so take this for what it’s worth, but I had a buddy who turned big…. ugly… knarly, knotty hunks of logs. He basically said, “the uglier, the better”

Anyways, they are REALLY unbalanced when he starts. He built a contraption that holds a router that can travel the length of the piece. The router spun a really big dish cutter or something. It was close to 3” in diameter. He used this to get the log round before he ever started working it with the lathe. Like a big router lathe but all it did was get chunky stumps down to something he felt comfortable spinning.

Guy might be nuts or maybe it was just the best he could come up with given the equipment at hand, but… it is what it is. :)

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Charlie

1017 posts in 944 days


#9 posted 09-01-2013 10:59 AM

From a structural standpoint, I’d probably just make a segmented cylinder. Ever try to crush a tube standing on end? If that’s still too scary for ya, drop a piece of 1” iron pipe into the center with a pipe flange on each end.

No wimpy granite slab will crush that. :)

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

1041 posts in 792 days


#10 posted 09-01-2013 01:39 PM

Yes, you can laminate boards, and turn columns to proper diameter and length. What material is he using for capitols & bases?

Would not rely too much on what customer says engineer said. You want to see an approved blue print and know installation done by licensed contrator. Unless had a release from liability signed by customer would walk away. I have no knowledge or experience with load bearing requirements.

At the end of the day customer might be better using dyed reinforced concrete for columns, base & capitols under granite slab.

-- Bill

View Loco's profile

Loco

210 posts in 407 days


#11 posted 09-01-2013 03:47 PM

” Engineers” LOL Yo. ‘gineer. Should I use crosscut or 1/4 sawn wood? “You’ll need to contact a wood_gineer”
Yo ‘gineer would varnish or polyurethane be better ? ” You’ll need to speak with a chemical engineer.
Yo ‘gineer. What’s better to bore a 13/16 hole in it, spade or auger ? ” You’ll need to contact a mechanical engineer”
Yo ‘gineer. Does your ole lady like trains ? “Well. The paper delivery guy says she is infatuated with him riding the caboose so, yeah. I suppose.”

-- What day is it ? No matter. Ummmm What month is it ? No moron. I paid for a 2 x 6. That means Two inches by six inches. I want the rest of my wood.

View REO's profile

REO

614 posts in 732 days


#12 posted 09-01-2013 09:16 PM

Very few of the large columns you see around are solid. A wood column on end has tremendous strength. especially for that short of height. A staved or glued up shell turned to the dimensions required would be cheaper, much lighter, and would eliminate the checking you will find in a solid blank that has had the pith or center turned or drilled out. I have done single piece (in length) 2’ x 24’ columns. Careful lay out of the staves and layout of the minor and major dimensions of the column as an end view will help as a visual aid. For roughing a router will work but try to get it cutting on the side instead of feeding it perpendicular to the axis it will cut faster and it will not be as hard on the router. I know that is kind of vague….A skill saw can be built into a sled and moved parallel to the length but with the blade perpendicular to the axis allowing for about a 3/8” deep cut. I used a dado blade on an arbor for this and finished with a specially sharpened single blade for details.

View Shawn Masterson's profile

Shawn Masterson

1254 posts in 606 days


#13 posted 09-01-2013 10:15 PM

I did something very similar along time ago. It was a 4’ cantilever on a raised bar. we tried to do it free hanging (so it looked like it was floating) with a huge steel bracket and it worked, but it had a little too much flex. we wound up putting an 8” fiberglass column under it.

View rrdesigns's profile

rrdesigns

494 posts in 1844 days


#14 posted 09-02-2013 01:15 AM

Still waiting to hear back from the client. I’m thinking I could ask the sawmill to turn it into a rough octagon or take the corners off with a power planer or recip saw. I have both. I could try to run it through my band saw, but each leg will probably weigh between 200-300 pounds, (it has only been air dried for a year and is still pretty green) and I would have to build some kind of sled to support it. Even though I have an 18” band saw, it has a small table and by the time you add a sled and turn the piece on edge, their probably won’t be enough clearance. The client wants the piece to check to add to the “aged” appearance, so that won’t be a problem if it does.

-- Beth, Oklahoma, Rambling Road Designs

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