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Arbor/Assembly Router Bit Help

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Forum topic by Matt Michaud posted 332 days ago 526 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Matt Michaud

28 posts in 1661 days


332 days ago

So I have a flush-cutting task that has a tendency to split when I reach the end grain (a common problem well explained here: http://lumberjocks.com/Jcw0013/blog/30963). Normally I can control this by climb-milling and other tricks, but this is an extremely hard wood that is being stubborn. Since I use a shaper which has a “reverse” switch, I was thinking of simply switching directions (same as flipping part and template over). Here is where I am stuck: I want to stick with router bits, not shaper bits so that I don’t need to constantly change spindles. I know some router bits, like slot cutters, have an arbor. I have never used one, but it seems like this cutter could be flipped, allowing me to cut in reverse. The problem is that any arbor-ed bits I have seen have very large diameter cutters, meaning I would need an equally large diameter bearing for flush cutting. Does anybody know of a relatively thick (so I dont have to stack a ton), small diameter (3/4”?) cutter that installs on an arbor?

My backup option is a reverse flush-cut bit – I have seen these in spiral bits, but never with a bearing.

-- "Strength in Composites" http://sandwichtechskis.com/ski-builders-shop.htm


7 replies so far

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Nicky

636 posts in 2688 days


#1 posted 331 days ago

Is this the type?

http://www.amanatool.com/routerbits/47170-ez-change-ocemco-system-TA-150.html

This one may not have the height you’re looking for, but I’m curious if its the type of solution you’re after.

-- Nicky

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Matt Michaud

28 posts in 1661 days


#2 posted 331 days ago

Awesome find. That would work great IF its flip-able. One end looks like it keys over the lower hex. Regular slot cutters don’t need to key on do they? Do the cutters tend to slip otherwise?

-- "Strength in Composites" http://sandwichtechskis.com/ski-builders-shop.htm

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pintodeluxe

3260 posts in 1409 days


#3 posted 331 days ago

On tricky template routing projects I have found it helpful to bandsaw fairly close to the cutline. Then I refine the profile very close to the line with a belt sander. By the time I am routing, I am only removing 1/16” of material.
A climb cut might even be safe, since so little material is being removed.

Best of luck.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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Nicky

636 posts in 2688 days


#4 posted 331 days ago

I just looked at my slot cutter, no index key, seems I can flip the cutter.

I’ve been faced with similar cuts and now use shear-cut bits (on router, don’t have a shaper anymore.)When I do pattern route, I really do try to minimize the material I need to remove, and as Willie mentioned, climb cut.

-- Nicky

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Matt Michaud

28 posts in 1661 days


#5 posted 331 days ago

Nicky, thanks for checking that for me. Are you using shear/straight bits or spiral? I have read claims that the spiral bits will prevent splitting, but I am skeptical. I have had good luck with the climbing on maple, but this is ipe (extremely hard) making a sharp corner – so climbing is really tough to control.

-- "Strength in Composites" http://sandwichtechskis.com/ski-builders-shop.htm

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Nicky

636 posts in 2688 days


#6 posted 331 days ago

I have both.

The spiral bit is http://www.amazon.com/CMT-191-507-11b-Double-Bearing-2-Edge/dp/B001FD8LIO

The shear-cut is Freud 42-204 3/4-Inch Down shear Helix Flush Trim Bit

The spiral bit, by far leaves a smoother cut, and less blow-out on end grain, but it’s almost 3x the price of the Freud down-shear. I use the spiral bit mainly for pattern routing using ebony (Greene and Greene accents.) I occasionally have some blowouts, but its the best method that I’ve come across to minimize problems.

The down-shear is great for trimming edges on long grain. Mixed results on end grain, but better then a standard straight bit.

-- Nicky

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Matt Michaud

28 posts in 1661 days


#7 posted 326 days ago

Precisionbits.com sold me the rabbet cutter and arbor for $15.

I heart them.

-- "Strength in Composites" http://sandwichtechskis.com/ski-builders-shop.htm

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