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Rivets for bottle opener?

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Forum topic by MikeinSC posted 08-21-2013 07:51 PM 866 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MikeinSC

60 posts in 834 days


08-21-2013 07:51 PM

I’m a new woodworker with only 3 cutting boards and loads of saw dust under my belt.

I grabbed this bottle opener the other day that I want to attach some sapele or walnut to for a friend. She was recently promoted to the manager of a beer tasting place.

Would anyone have suggestions on stainless steel rivets to use? Would it be better to make some from SS bolts and epoxy them in? Or is there a SS rivet kit from a woodworking place to buy?

Thanks

-- I am what they call a "rookie".


9 replies so far

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

3398 posts in 1333 days


#1 posted 08-21-2013 08:05 PM

Stainless is really difficult to work with in this case.
Even drilling the holes can cost you a drill bit per hole if you don’t do it correctly, (Low speed and a lot of pressure), and use a coolant.

My suggestion would be to use brass for the rivets. My choice of brass would be one of the brass replacement rods for the toilet float ball.

Good luck.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

View crank49's profile

crank49

3709 posts in 1817 days


#2 posted 08-21-2013 08:22 PM

Yes, the brass sounds like an excellent idea,

-- Michael :-{| Don't anthropomorphise your tools, they hate it when you do that.

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2495 days


#3 posted 08-21-2013 08:36 PM

brass may be easier to work with, but depending on the choice of wood and considering the material of the opener, SS might be the better choice still in terms of looks.

use a centering/stub drill to drill a pilot hole, then finis with the final size drill – use cutting oil/coolant and you should be good to go.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View MikeinSC's profile

MikeinSC

60 posts in 834 days


#4 posted 08-21-2013 11:52 PM

Thank you folks. I picked up the brass rod for a float and some marine grade epoxy for the handle.

Hopefully I won’t screw it up too badly

-- I am what they call a "rookie".

View MikeinSC's profile

MikeinSC

60 posts in 834 days


#5 posted 08-22-2013 04:00 AM

So far I’ve learned that a drill press would be a necessity for this so that the drill bit doesn’t wander. Even with a punch mark, the bit wanders once it finally starts to cut.

The brass rod looks good paired with the sapele.

-- I am what they call a "rookie".

View Woodbum's profile

Woodbum

554 posts in 1912 days


#6 posted 08-22-2013 01:19 PM

Check with knife building supply companies. They usually have a wide assortment of rivets and split rivets that have a screw in post and screw setup. A driill press with carbide bits such as a Bad Dog bit are necessary.

-- "Standing tall has nothing to do with height"

View lew's profile

lew

10307 posts in 2602 days


#7 posted 08-22-2013 01:44 PM

Although these folks specialize in knife making supplies, I think you might find the rivets you need-
http://www.knifemaking.com/SearchResults.asp?searching=Y&sort=13&search=rivets&show=20&page=2

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2495 days


#8 posted 08-22-2013 01:55 PM

nice find Lew. is that the one you used when you made the kitchen knives?

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View MikeinSC's profile

MikeinSC

60 posts in 834 days


#9 posted 08-22-2013 04:38 PM

Thanks for the links. Those are excellent.

Are there any suggestions for a good epoxy? I used a two part marine epoxy from ACE, it’s kinda difficult to spread and to mess with.

-- I am what they call a "rookie".

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