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What thickness to mill lumber

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Forum topic by Slabguy posted 08-20-2013 09:36 PM 823 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Slabguy

24 posts in 420 days


08-20-2013 09:36 PM

I plan to start milling some lumber from trees on my property. Should I try to mill a good mixture of 4/4, 6/4, 8/4 etc… or should I mainly stick with one thickness that is useful in most applications? Thanks.


10 replies so far

View Don W's profile

Don W

15019 posts in 1219 days


#1 posted 08-20-2013 09:57 PM

I would cut a mix, but if you’re going to use it, cut what you’ll use.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

2904 posts in 1139 days


#2 posted 08-20-2013 10:01 PM

I cut what I plan on using then cut as thick as I can on everything else.

My theory is that I can always re-saw but I can’t uncut it.

Good Luck!

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

View Loco's profile

Loco

210 posts in 401 days


#3 posted 08-20-2013 10:02 PM

I like to dry mine 2 3/8 or 2 1/2, full width and size them later. These are width sized and dry but not planed-sanded yet.

-- What day is it ? No matter. Ummmm What month is it ? No moron. I paid for a 2 x 6. That means Two inches by six inches. I want the rest of my wood.

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1127 posts in 1128 days


#4 posted 08-21-2013 01:42 AM

A mix for sure.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln

View Shawn Masterson's profile

Shawn Masterson

1254 posts in 600 days


#5 posted 08-21-2013 02:14 AM

one thing to remember is the thicker you cut it the longer it takes to dry.

View rustfever's profile

rustfever

624 posts in 1962 days


#6 posted 08-21-2013 02:51 AM

When re sawing thick lumber, you must be sure it is dry consistently, all the way thru. If not, the re-sawn face may be wetter than the other, and it will dry like a pretzel. Now you have two worthless boards!
Been there, done that!

-- Rustfever, Central California

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

3356 posts in 1465 days


#7 posted 08-21-2013 05:03 AM

I would mill half at 4/4, and the rest split between 5/4 and 8/4.
5/4 makes great tabletops. 8/4 will make curved chair rails, as well as leg stock.
4/4 can make everything else.

good luck with it!

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View Loco's profile

Loco

210 posts in 401 days


#8 posted 08-21-2013 07:07 AM

Slow drying results in less checks,depending on the woods density and oil content, of course.

-- What day is it ? No matter. Ummmm What month is it ? No moron. I paid for a 2 x 6. That means Two inches by six inches. I want the rest of my wood.

View Slabguy's profile

Slabguy

24 posts in 420 days


#9 posted 08-21-2013 01:05 PM

Thanks for the help guys. All good answers

View grizzlymunchin's profile

grizzlymunchin

47 posts in 395 days


#10 posted 08-21-2013 01:50 PM

cutting at 5/4 will enable you to get good straight lumber if its cupped or bowed a little I learned this the hard way

-- woodshop by the cornfeild

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