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6" Boice & Crane Jointer

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Forum topic by Boodles posted 375 days ago 1926 views 0 times favorited 34 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Boodles

31 posts in 391 days


375 days ago

Hello Everyone!

As usual, I’m on CL teasing myself looking at used tools, and I found this 6” Boice & Crane Jointer for $80. I just called the guy and he said his friend did some work on it and restored it, and that it works well…

Also, what is the price range for a 6” jointer from a “good” brand that will serve my limited needs to a while (brand new to woodworking, and so far have some hand tools and a TS).

Boice & Crane – http://orangecounty.craigslist.org/tls/4007028879.html

Or, would a C-man be better for around $100ish?

Any thoughts?

Thanks!


34 replies so far

View b2rtch's profile

b2rtch

4318 posts in 1681 days


#1 posted 375 days ago

In general I recommend to not buy a 6” joiner as you will out grow it almost immediately.
I recommend to skip the 6” and to buy at least a 8” jointer, 10” being even better.

-- Bert

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Loren

7431 posts in 2281 days


#2 posted 375 days ago

6” is fine for most work in my experience. You have
to start somewhere. Used 8” jointers sell in So. Cal
for $350 and up so you could certainly hold out if
you wanted to.

That Boice Crane has been for sale for awhile. It
looks like it is set up with a nice catch box for
chips, which is something you won’t usually get.

Also, see that big ledge? It can be used to support
boards when surface jointing stock wider than 6”.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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Boodles

31 posts in 391 days


#3 posted 375 days ago

Thanks for the replies… I don’t plan on doing much more than small things (boxes, small bedside tables, etc) for a few years (being a full time student and all), so I think that 6” will be adequate.

Loren, would this be a good buy for $80, or should I keep looking/wait?

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firefighterontheside

3890 posts in 490 days


#4 posted 375 days ago

The most jointing I do is edge joiinting so it doesn’t matter how wide it is. What mattered for me was the length of the table. I wanted to be able to joint longer boards so I got the 6 with a 46” table. If I need to flatten a real wide board I’ll use my thickness planer with a jig. I think that voice would be worth a try for maybe 60 or 70.

-- Bill M. I love my job as a firefighter, but nothing gives me the satisfaction of running my hand over a project that I have built and just finished sanding.

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waho6o9

4839 posts in 1210 days


#5 posted 375 days ago

That big ledge can also be used to make tenons as well.

Good eye Loren.

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Loren

7431 posts in 2281 days


#6 posted 375 days ago

Oh that’s a good deal, especially considering the
guard is there and it’s all set up and running right.

You certainly won’t get hurt at that price.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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shampeon

1350 posts in 817 days


#7 posted 375 days ago

$80 for a working Boice-Crane jointer with stand, motor, and catch box is a very good deal, IMO. These were well-made machines.

-- ian | "You can't stop what's coming. It ain't all waiting on you. That's vanity."

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Boodles

31 posts in 391 days


#8 posted 375 days ago

So I’ve been doing a bit more research on jointers.. and I have uncovered a hotly debated topic – buy a jointer or planer first?

Any input?

Also, thanks for all the responses, guys!

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firefighterontheside

3890 posts in 490 days


#9 posted 375 days ago

I’ve had a planer for 15 years. Jointer for 1. They go well togethr, but I think if you’re gonna have one it has to be the planer. If you want particular thickness of stock you need the planer. You can do some jointing with the planer with a jig.

-- Bill M. I love my job as a firefighter, but nothing gives me the satisfaction of running my hand over a project that I have built and just finished sanding.

View Loren's profile

Loren

7431 posts in 2281 days


#10 posted 375 days ago

You can do a lot with a jointer, band saw and hand planes.

Affordable benchtop planers have really changed the
way hobbiests can invest in machinery. Planers
used to be really substantial investments. Say
you wanted to make a table – you’d flatten and
thickness the board by hand and do the edges
on the jointer. Then you’d do the top and bottom
with hand planes after it was glued up. For the
square legs you would joint two adjoining faces so they
were square and straight, then band saw
parallel the other two faces which you could then
clean up with the jointer without losing dimensional
consistency.

You really want both for working in solid wood. With
planers being so affordable now it’s not so hard
to get both. For the price of a used 8” jointer
you could get a 6” and a planer.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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Boodles

31 posts in 391 days


#11 posted 374 days ago

Perfect, thanks guys!! Turns out I can get a C-man Model # 351.217880 of CL for $100 (maybe less if I negotiate).. it’s a much newer machine, and parts are readily available (it was released in 2002).

How would a machine like this compare to the Boice-Crane? It’s still a 6” jointer..

Thank you all for your patience!

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

477 posts in 832 days


#12 posted 374 days ago

$80 for that jointer is a great deal.. those BC jointers are built like a tank and will last forever. Knives are readily available and standard, as are the cutter head bearings. Everything else is cast iron or standard hardware store stuff, so you most likely will never need anything else for it. It is also fairly unique in that it has a full length fence and a fence lock on the both ends, so once you lock it down, it stays put and doesn’t flex regardless of how much pressure is put on it. I’d take the BC over a craftsman any day (and did). I picked up mine in much rougher shape for $85 (although it did have the original factory stand) and did the restore myself. It’s been a joy to use ever since. Here is a picture of mine after the restore:

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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shampeon

1350 posts in 817 days


#13 posted 374 days ago

That Craftsman is a benchtop light-duty hobbyist toy. The B-C is much heavier duty. A wrench from the dollar store and a forged Snap-On wrench are both wrenches, right?

-- ian | "You can't stop what's coming. It ain't all waiting on you. That's vanity."

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tefinn

1207 posts in 1070 days


#14 posted 374 days ago

I’ve restored a couple of Boice-Crane jointers. The Craftsman can’t compare to them! The 351 model C-man is a bench top model with lots of plastic and aluminum parts. It has a short bed and low hp. The Boice-Crane is all cast iron and a longer bed. The hp is only limited to the size of the motor you put on it. The one on CL looks like a 1400 series made from late 30’s to early 50’s.

-- Tom Finnigan - Measures? We don't need no stinking measures! - Hmm, maybe thats why my project pieces don't fit.

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waho6o9

4839 posts in 1210 days


#15 posted 374 days ago

Beautiful restore Brad, good job.

showing 1 through 15 of 34 replies

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