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Preventing cupping in green hard maple

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Forum topic by Slabguy posted 08-19-2013 01:47 AM 766 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Slabguy

30 posts in 517 days


08-19-2013 01:47 AM

I just purchased a chainsaw mill and plan to mill some maple from logs I’ve cut off my property. I’ve already had some milled by a local sawmill. He cut a few thick slabs for me for a coffee table. The rest he cut into 1×8s and they’ve warped pretty badly over the past month and a half while drying in the garage. It stays pretty humid here in west tn so I didn’t think it would be an issue. Now I’m worried that when I mill any more lumber it will warp while drying. What are some ways to minimize warping while drying fresh cut lumber? I only have maple logs right now but I will be cutting some white oak and hickory as well. Any suggestions are much appreciated.


7 replies so far

View TCCcabinetmaker's profile

TCCcabinetmaker

925 posts in 1103 days


#1 posted 08-19-2013 05:05 AM

The important thing here is to let the wood dry evenly all the way around. You need to have strips of wood between the boards to allow the air to move all the way around the lumber.

As for the warped/cupped boards, the sun is your ally. Put the boards in the sun crown side up, moisten the board, and it should allow the cup to be pulled out by the drying action.

-- The mark of a good carpenter is not how few mistakes he makes, but rather how well he fixes them.

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1213 posts in 1224 days


#2 posted 08-19-2013 12:14 PM

Also try to saw the boards with the pith in the log level. Put your best grade and widest boards on the bottom of the sticker stack so the weight of the lower grade boards will help keep the best boards flat as they dry. Sometimes, though, you just get a log that will not behave.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

View Slabguy's profile

Slabguy

30 posts in 517 days


#3 posted 08-19-2013 06:15 PM

Thanks for the tips guys. I have pretty much a free supply of 3/4” pvc conduit. Could I use that for stickers? I’m thinking on a flat surface and with all the weight rolling shouldn’t be a problem and mildew shouldn’t be a problem with the pvc.

View grizzlymunchin's profile

grizzlymunchin

47 posts in 492 days


#4 posted 08-20-2013 02:02 AM

1st you really should have cut it at 5/4 that way it will cleanup better but sticker it flat as possible with weight on top

-- woodshop by the cornfeild

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grizzlymunchin

47 posts in 492 days


#5 posted 08-20-2013 02:04 AM

good luck with the lumber and send some my way if you don’t need it

-- woodshop by the cornfeild

View Slabguy's profile

Slabguy

30 posts in 517 days


#6 posted 08-20-2013 02:37 AM

Well after the 2 slabs he cut out I guess all he could get out of the log was 1” because there were only 3 boards.

View Woodendeavor's profile

Woodendeavor

228 posts in 1355 days


#7 posted 08-20-2013 02:51 AM

This is a general rule of thumb. To keep lumber straight when drying sticker the material every 16 inches and add 100 pounds of ballast per square foot on top of the pile. This should keep that material nice and flat while drying. Also seal all end grain as soon as possible to help with splits

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