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Forum topic by DavidATX posted 08-18-2013 11:57 AM 1917 views 1 time favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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DavidATX

25 posts in 1263 days


08-18-2013 11:57 AM

Hello fellow lumberjocks! I just made my first end grain cutting board and some other projects that have turned into a little business on the side. I found these on etsy and thought they were really cool and he said they were end grain but I’m thinking they are just long grain? Am I missing something? Also, on these banana boards how do make something thin like this? They are 1/4 inch thick. Do you glue up 1” or 1/2” stock and saw in half? I only have a small band saw right now. Thanks for the tips and advice. Greatly appreciate everything I have learned from this site.


7 replies so far

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fredj

185 posts in 1279 days


#1 posted 08-18-2013 12:28 PM

Looks like long grain to me. If I as making something 1/4 thick and too wide to resaw I’d resaw each piece, glue it up and plane it down.

-- Fredj

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bannerpond1

397 posts in 1360 days


#2 posted 08-18-2013 01:54 PM

It’s absolutely long grain. The person who put these on Etsy is either just parroting the “end grain” description to make it more saleable or else he doesn’t know what he’s talking about. This happens on eBay all the time. Beware the description of what you are buying. Demand photos and exact description. If in doubt, “x” them out. Don’t get caught in an unscrupulous scheme.

-- --Dale Page

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bannerpond1

397 posts in 1360 days


#3 posted 08-18-2013 01:58 PM

David, with end grain boards, you can glue up as thin a slat as you want. It doesn’t matter. I’ve made a couple using 1/4 slats and then staggering them after rolling the cut-offs 90 degrees. It makes the process seem very intricate, but it’s no more difficult than any other width.

-- --Dale Page

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fredj

185 posts in 1279 days


#4 posted 08-18-2013 03:47 PM

David, another thing you want to keep in mind in making cutting boards is the types of wood you use. Many people are allergic to some of the exotic woods, so food should not come in contact with those woods. Finish should also be food safe. Walnut oil works very well, after all you can eat it. Personally, I’d also avoid open grain woods as the open grain is more likely to hold harmful bacteria. The tannins in wood do to some extent inhibit the growth of bacteria, which is not true of plastic cutting boards other than ones that contain “Microban” and who wants to eat that ?

-- Fredj

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Dallas

3599 posts in 1948 days


#5 posted 08-18-2013 04:16 PM

fredj, Think about what you said…..David, another thing you want to keep in mind in making cutting boards is the types of wood you use. Many people are allergic to some of the exotic woods, so food should not come in contact with those woods. Finish should also be food safe. Walnut oil works very well, after all you can eat it.

I would bet more people are allergic to nuts than they are to exotic woods.

Mineral oil has been used for decades with no ill fated consequences. Bees Wax is even better.

A mixture of both is a better compromise.

You might want to read the findings from the University of Wisconsin.

You are correct though about the plastic boards, although I have always wondered about how long the ‘Microban’ might last.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

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tefinn

1222 posts in 1898 days


#6 posted 08-18-2013 04:23 PM

They look to me like the boards are face glued, with the edges making the surface of the cutting board. Look at the edge grain of the maple and walnut in the first picture. Definitely not end grain in any of them.

-- Tom Finnigan - Measures? We don't need no stinking measures! - Hmm, maybe thats why my project pieces don't fit.

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DavidATX

25 posts in 1263 days


#7 posted 08-19-2013 08:26 PM

Thanks Fred and Dale! I thought I was missing something but I guess not. I read all the information on running end grain through the planer and built a router planer to accomplish my first board. If it was long grain I could run it through the planer?
I did use Howards conditioner which as mineral oil and bees wax and it seemed to work well. I felt bad cutting on it for the first time yesterday but like a new car they will get nicks and it needs to get broken in!

Here was my first cutting board.

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