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How would you build "The Ultimate Shop Cart"??????

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Forum topic by StumpyNubs posted 08-17-2013 06:31 PM 3065 views 2 times favorited 60 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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StumpyNubs

6192 posts in 1452 days


08-17-2013 06:31 PM

Topic tags/keywords: shop cart

I’m planning on making a shop cart on the next episode of Blue Collar Woodworking and I’ve been asking everybody I know what they would put on theirs.

What I mean is, a mobile table/bench/cart sort of thing that could be rolled around the shop and used for assembly, as a work surface, anything and everything. The top would be a work surface, and underneath could be spots for tools, clamps, fasteners, tools you always want handy… you name it.

Seriously… YOU name it. I want you to give me some ideas. So have at ‘er!

Here’s a couple of shop carts built by our fellow LJ’s to get the ideas flowing. Of course I want to make it unique, so don’t say “just make a bunch of drawers”. :)

Click for details

Click for details

Click for details

Size is an issue, this isn’t going to be HUGE or anything. The top will be around 28” X 40” and of average height.

(Note: I don’t actually want you to “name” the cart, just tell me what you’d put on yours if you were building it.)

-- It's the best woodworking show since the invention of wood... New episodes at: http://www.stumpynubs.com


60 replies so far

View Gary's profile

Gary

7217 posts in 2084 days


#1 posted 08-17-2013 06:53 PM

Two things I would consider.
1. I’d wire it and put an extension cord on it so I could have power if needed, or roll up the cord if not.

2. I’d put a Randy guard on it so he would have to leave it alone. Wouldn’t want it to end up in his “Lair”

-- Gary, DeKalb Texas only 4 miles from the mill

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StumpyNubs

6192 posts in 1452 days


#2 posted 08-17-2013 06:58 PM

Randy guard, eh? I like it!

-- It's the best woodworking show since the invention of wood... New episodes at: http://www.stumpynubs.com

View Mip's profile

Mip

316 posts in 729 days


#3 posted 08-17-2013 07:07 PM

Take Gary’s idea with the extension cord and build a manual winding reel for it so you don’t have to wind it up over one arm like I do right now. Plug one end into a surge protector mounted on the cart and pull out the other end to the wall outlet. Another thing, beer holder.

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Gary

7217 posts in 2084 days


#4 posted 08-17-2013 07:20 PM

Also, if it were mine, I’d probably use it for glue-ups a lot. I’d have a drawer for clamps, rack on one end for bar clamps, and a specific spot on the end for glue.

-- Gary, DeKalb Texas only 4 miles from the mill

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Gary

7217 posts in 2084 days


#5 posted 08-17-2013 07:21 PM

I’m throwing ideas, Stumpy. Maybe a torsion box top for super solid/flat surface

-- Gary, DeKalb Texas only 4 miles from the mill

View JustJoe's profile

JustJoe

1554 posts in 690 days


#6 posted 08-17-2013 07:25 PM

If it’s going to be used as an assembly bench then:
shorter than a normal bench but not too much.
storage for clamps on the side and some grooves or something so they can be set up on top with one hand. Or built-in clamps that flip up when needed
some flip-out holders for chisels, scrapers, rags, whatever the clean-up tool of choice is.
A holster for a cordless drill or screwdriver for those who like to use screws.
Or a place underneath for the air tank and a hook on the side for those who like Norm (a little glue and we’ll just finish it off with some brad nails to hold it in place. pfffft pffft pffft.)
A replacable drawer or box that can be configured to the task at hand, and a small separate storage system for the spare boxes.

-- This Ad Space For Sale! Your Ad Here! Reach a targeted audience! Affordable Rates, easy financing! Contact an ad represenative today at JustJoe's Advertising Consortium.

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StumpyNubs

6192 posts in 1452 days


#7 posted 08-17-2013 07:26 PM

I actually think I’m going to use one of these. They’re a little pricey, but super flat, thick and built in T-Tracks with intersections. That would make it useful for all sorts of stuff.

-- It's the best woodworking show since the invention of wood... New episodes at: http://www.stumpynubs.com

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Gary

7217 posts in 2084 days


#8 posted 08-17-2013 07:28 PM

Well, here’s another. I’ve often thought of building one that could be used as an extension to the table saw that had spots for the blades, wrenches, various …... can’t think of the word….throat plates…. you know what I mean.

-- Gary, DeKalb Texas only 4 miles from the mill

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Gary

7217 posts in 2084 days


#9 posted 08-17-2013 07:38 PM

OK, my last input. I’m probably a cheapskate but, $230 just for the top would stop me

-- Gary, DeKalb Texas only 4 miles from the mill

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StumpyNubs

6192 posts in 1452 days


#10 posted 08-17-2013 07:51 PM

No, that doesn’t make you a cheapskate. I think it’s expensive too. I’m getting a deal on it.

-- It's the best woodworking show since the invention of wood... New episodes at: http://www.stumpynubs.com

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Gary

7217 posts in 2084 days


#11 posted 08-17-2013 08:02 PM

Well, just be sure to keep the Randy guard in it

-- Gary, DeKalb Texas only 4 miles from the mill

View Pimzedd's profile

Pimzedd

450 posts in 2455 days


#12 posted 08-17-2013 09:13 PM

I like Greg’s idea at http://lumberjocks.com/projects/19642 You could put the T-tracks in it.

Keep meaning to make me one some day.

-- Bill - Mesquite, TX --- "Everything with a power cord eventually winds up in the trash.” John Sarge , timber framer and blacksmith instructor at Tillers International school

View Dogboy's profile

Dogboy

77 posts in 1264 days


#13 posted 08-17-2013 09:16 PM

Surge bar. Like clamps one can never have to many outlets. This may sound stupid but my shop cart is heavy…really heavy (layers of 3/4 MDF on top of cabinets from made from thick laminated composite). If I lock the casters it aint going anywhere. Its weight lets me clamp bench top tools to it (dampening vibration). Anyway I have this old fence from a buddy who upgraded his table saws fence to a really long Excalibur model and I have thought about mounting the fence to the cart and putting some of those adjustable shelf brackets on the side. This would allow me to mount different tools on the side and use the fence as a fence (for my spindle sander or router table for example) or as an easily adjustable stop for the bench top tools.

-- No mistakes, just kindling

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bondogaposis

2524 posts in 1002 days


#14 posted 08-17-2013 09:20 PM

I would make one that can double as an outfeed table and have a downdraft sanding surface built in to the top.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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elduque

31 posts in 555 days


#15 posted 08-17-2013 09:38 PM

That Rockler table-top is way TOO nice! Too nice to mess up with dry wall screws. I would frame the table-top so that it would LIFT OFF. A sturdy,rolling cabinet with inter-change-able, lift-off / drop-on table-tops.

1) Rockler T-track table-top- for the well-planned,perfectly-executed jobs.

2) 3/4” plywood table-top – you can drywall-screw a jig onto it, dig a groove in it with a wen allsaw, write on it with a sanford ultra-fine point sharpie,spray paint all over it, and throw it away after you’ve destroyed it.

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