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My Husband's Latest Finishing Emergency: Adirondack Chairs

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Forum topic by JUNECLEAVER posted 08-15-2013 04:12 PM 850 views 1 time favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JUNECLEAVER

15 posts in 1741 days


08-15-2013 04:12 PM

Topic tags/keywords: western cedar adirondack chair outdoor finish varnish stain sealer

Hello my LJ friends!

Once again, I turn to you in time of need and hope you can offer your wisdom and advice.

Here’s the situation: My husband is building a set of Adirondack chairs for the yard; he is furiously researching the best finishing option for maintaining the beautiful western cedar color and grain.

Now, one possibility is to use a good marine-grade spar varnish such as Epifanes or Pettit Captains Varnish. Another is to try a quality oil stain/sealer such as Penofin Red. Unfortunately, there seems to be so much conflicting information as which to apply, he is in quite a finishing quandry. On a previous project, he used CWF-UV, but was extremely disappointed with the condition of the exposed surfaces after less than one season.

So, right now, any thought of me relaxing in my custom made chair is on hold, because my husband will not go any further without some serious advice. Any suggestions for a preferred product?

Trust me, I eagerly await your responses! Thanks SO much!

-- Uptown Girl, Long Island, New York


8 replies so far

View Moron's profile

Moron

4666 posts in 2546 days


#1 posted 08-15-2013 04:20 PM

Hi

I have used with great success the Petit Marine Varnish, but as with a boat that is exposed to UVA and UVB, it is necessary to scuff and sand every year or two to maintain the finish.

I also use a recipe from Don Kondra of this forum (an award winning artisan) where he uses the following recipe. Its easier to apply but requires several more coats. in a 1 qt mason jar. 50% paint thinner, 25% Marine Varnish, 25% Tongue Oil and 1 TSP of Japan dryer. …… I personally love this finish as its easy to maintain, easy to repair and a pleasure to apply, water proof, and tough.

Best of luck to you

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View JUNECLEAVER's profile

JUNECLEAVER

15 posts in 1741 days


#2 posted 08-15-2013 04:27 PM

Thanks so much for your amazingly fast response! I am very grateful, indeed…

My very best to you, as well!

Thanks again!

-- Uptown Girl, Long Island, New York

View johnstoneb's profile

johnstoneb

688 posts in 826 days


#3 posted 08-16-2013 02:56 AM

+1 on Moron’s post. No matter what finish you use over time the WRC will grey out. You will need to pressure wash or sand it back to original color before refinishing.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

View JUNECLEAVER's profile

JUNECLEAVER

15 posts in 1741 days


#4 posted 08-16-2013 01:43 PM

Thanks so much, Bruce; I do appreciate your help!

-- Uptown Girl, Long Island, New York

View Manitario's profile

Manitario

2336 posts in 1536 days


#5 posted 08-16-2013 01:56 PM

Marine grade spar varnish is the way to go. Stay away from oil stain/sealer and all the outdoors stuff sold in big box stores; I’ve tried many of them with limited success. Silkins makes a product called “Cico” which is a type of marine varnish that works well.
As well, there’s a good review in Fine Woodworking that goes through a bunch of outdoor finishes:
Fine Wood Working May 1, 2009 #205 p52

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

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JUNECLEAVER

15 posts in 1741 days


#6 posted 08-16-2013 02:02 PM

Great; thanks so much! I will research the issue of FW you’ve referenced. Thanks again!

-- Uptown Girl, Long Island, New York

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

3774 posts in 2316 days


#7 posted 08-16-2013 02:25 PM

Epifanes looks great … for awhile.

I used it on lawn furniture I built using western red cedar ( http://lumberjocks.com/projects/9601 ), and really liked the results. Unfortunately, after a year or so, it began to check so we sanded and re-coated it. That only worked for a short time (less than a year) before it began to peel. This furniture has never exposed to winter elements, and is covered 6 or 7 months a year.

I may sand them (again) and try the recipe in moron’s post. If that doesn’t do the trick, I may have some fuel for the fire pit.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View JUNECLEAVER's profile

JUNECLEAVER

15 posts in 1741 days


#8 posted 08-16-2013 05:08 PM

Thanks, Gerry; my husband is thinking of using that formula, too. And, really spectacular garden furniture; thanks for the link!

Thanks again for your help!

-- Uptown Girl, Long Island, New York

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