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Forum topic by Cabfurmaker posted 08-14-2013 09:40 AM 1019 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Cabfurmaker

1 post in 1211 days


08-14-2013 09:40 AM

Hi everyone, I’m new to this board and need some advice, I’m a 27 year old cabinetmaker, I work for a company that does high end work, bars, casinos, hospitals, hotels, things like that, I have a degree for cabinetmaking and wood technology and been involved in woodworking since I was 13,

Here’s my question, I love my job but my real passion is building furniture, I’ve been thinking about in my free time making furniture and selling it, small stuff, lamps, clocks, etc. I can make everything I want to at work in my free time, I don’t expect to make big bucks but I just want to make a few things and try to sell them and hopefully make a few bucks, does anyone have any advice /suggestions if this is a good or bad idea, etc.


6 replies so far

View huff's profile

huff

2828 posts in 2749 days


#1 posted 08-14-2013 12:07 PM

Cabfurmaker;

Welcome to LJ’s.

Sounds like you have a great background and a good start in woodworking.

I take from what your saying;( I can make everything I want to at work in my free time, I don’t expect to make big bucks but I just want to make a few things and try to sell them and hopefully make a few bucks),
you don’t have a shop or tools at home but you can use the tools @ work on your free time.

I would suggest that if you want to learn to build and sell furniture; your first commitment would be to read, watch videos and study everything you can about furniture or cabinet making.

Your second commitment would be; to start investing in tools and a shop (even if it’s a shed, garage or your basement).

Your third commitment would be; to never use someone elses tools to make anything for yourself if you plan on selling it. In business ethics 101; that’s a big NO NO!

I’m sure your boss doesn’t mind you building a few things to learn more about your trade and improve your skills, but once you start making money off his shop, overhead, tools and everything else his lively hood depends on, then his attitude is sure to change.

Good luck with your venture and look forward to seeing some of your work.

-- John @ http://www.thehuffordfurnituregroup.com

View nailbanger2's profile

nailbanger2

1041 posts in 2607 days


#2 posted 08-14-2013 12:25 PM

And, though Huff doesn’t want to blow his own horn, you might want to read his blog series.

http://lumberjocks.com/huff/blog/36271

Good Luck!

-- Wish I were Norm's Nephew

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Moron

5032 posts in 3357 days


#3 posted 08-14-2013 03:16 PM

I’ve just about stopped giving advice but here you go

Why not ? You have the free use of tools and shop time, you have the time, what could you possibly loose by trying to make a few extra bucks ?

I admire graceful ambition

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

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Moron

5032 posts in 3357 days


#4 posted 08-14-2013 04:00 PM

further

Tell your boss what your doing. If he/she says its OK, then you have no worries. I doubt making clocks etc., will have any financial impact on a company that builds hotels, casinos etc.,

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View Joe339's profile

Joe339

1 post in 1210 days


#5 posted 08-14-2013 05:37 PM

Find a niche you enjoy & are good at…something different, unique. Lamps, clocks, etc are a “dime a dozen” unless you do something different. If your product is the same as 100 others just like it you can only differentiate your product based on price…not where you want to be. Experiment with design, materials, etc and find a market niche for your product. Think Steve Jobs…..

View Puzzleman's profile

Puzzleman

411 posts in 2408 days


#6 posted 08-14-2013 06:27 PM

Think about where you are going to sell your wares. Making things is fun and enjoyable. Selling the same things is harder. A few ideas to start with might be places like ETSYdotcom, local art and craft shows, bazaars. I would stay away from low end shows like flea markets and church craft shows.

Huff also has a great blog on marketing. It’s not as easy as it seems.

Jim

-- Jim Beachler, Chief Puzzler, http://www.hollowwoodworks.com

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