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Forum topic by melliott posted 08-14-2013 01:33 AM 790 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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melliott

28 posts in 1471 days


08-14-2013 01:33 AM

Hi all….I am building new beds for my kids. I picked up some hardware to attach the siderails to the headboard and footboard and I was just wondering what type of screw would be best to use for attaching the hardware. They are made from pine and I dont want the screws to pull out over time. Do they have a Loctite for wood screws like they do for machine screws? Any help is greatly appreciated…...Mike

-- Mike


7 replies so far

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RussellAP

3059 posts in 1749 days


#1 posted 08-14-2013 01:55 AM

For pine that is likely to get a lot of stress, I’d use a lag bolt whenever possible. Screws won’t hold in pine for something that gets as much stress as a kids bed will. Actually if it’s not where you can see it, I’d use both if I could. Also consider a through tenon but re-enforce it with some metal like they use for joist hangers, you can nibble the excess away. Or consider using oak for the frame parts that cant be seen, like the legs and matress and boxspring rails. Be sure to screw in the support slats to the side rails, or they will flex out and keep falling out.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

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firefighterontheside

13466 posts in 1319 days


#2 posted 08-14-2013 02:01 AM

What I have started to use is a lag screw that is made by the same company that makes the exterior torx screws that I use. It is a lag screw but with a torx head. It is very aggressive threads and looks better than galvanized.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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RussellAP

3059 posts in 1749 days


#3 posted 08-14-2013 02:10 AM

Lag screws are good, just dont over tighten it in pine, or the threads might strip. I prefer to use a bolt and washers on pine for these types of connections where reinforcing would be awkward.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

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tefinn

1222 posts in 1899 days


#4 posted 08-14-2013 02:32 AM

Since you asked what screws to attatch the “hardware” with, I’m guessing you bought a side rail connecting system of some type. If the hardware doesn’t have or recommend a certain screw, use the longest coarse thread screw that doesn’t penetrate the side rails and fits the holes in the hardware. I usually use http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=11&site=ROCKLER or http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=5783&site=ROCKLER. Both come with specs on what screws are required.

-- Tom Finnigan - Measures? We don't need no stinking measures! - Hmm, maybe thats why my project pieces don't fit.

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babarracus

3 posts in 1217 days


#5 posted 08-14-2013 02:57 AM

An option I haven’t seen mentioned is a cross-dowel/knockdown nut: http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=30249&site=ROCKLER

But then you either have to counterbore the bolts or have them visible.

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melliott

28 posts in 1471 days


#6 posted 08-14-2013 04:17 PM

Thanks everyone for the advice.

-- Mike

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MrRon

3926 posts in 2706 days


#7 posted 08-14-2013 07:46 PM

Use a 1/4”-20 hex head bolt, fender washer and a locknut at each point where an attachment is made; usually 2 per attachment point. The fender washer will spread out the clamping force of the bolt/nut.

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