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Rewiring R4512 with new power cord?

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Forum topic by ADHDan posted 08-13-2013 08:06 PM 2169 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ADHDan

800 posts in 1576 days


08-13-2013 08:06 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

So my shop electric work is finally complete. Including the two pre-existing circuits, I now have a 110v circuit for my dust collector, a 110v circuit for my benchtop tools, a 110v circuit for my overhead lights, a 110v circuit for other use, and a 220v circuit for my table saw.

Now I’m faced with the task of converting my R4512 to 220v. The motor junction box part seems straightforwad – just follow the diagram in the manual. But, the power cord on the R4512 is really short, and I don’t want to run a 220v extension cord. So I picked up some heavy duty 12 gauge wire and a plug, figuring I’d just replace the power cord at the on/off switch. I plan to leave the cord from the switch to the motor alone (other than redoing the junction box wiring), and just swap out the factory power cord for a longer one.

I’m relatively new to doing electrical work, and I really don’t want to do anything that would be unsafe or could damage the saw. So I was just wondering if there’s anything I REALLY should know before tackling this. Thanks!

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.


10 replies so far

View toolie's profile

toolie

2025 posts in 2096 days


#1 posted 08-13-2013 08:40 PM

disassemble in this order, making sure the saw in unplugged from the power outlet: black (power) first, white (neutral) second, green (ground) last. when connecting the new 220 cord, attach the green wire first then either of the two remaining wires (they are both hot) to either of the switch, and/or plug, connection points. 220v wiring is really relatively simpler than 110v wiring as there’s no neutral. so ground wire goes to ground connection point and either wire goes to either of the two remaining connection points. no way to have polarity issues.

get a 110/220v test light at hd and verify there’s 220v at the switch once the new wire is in place before energizing the motor.

FWIW, i use this on my 10-340 BS (2 hp motor):

http://www.homedepot.com/p/9-ft-12-3-3-Wire-Appliance-Cord-YC-2A1-YC-2F4/202353559#specifications

works like a charm, and it’s relatively inexpensive.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

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ADHDan

800 posts in 1576 days


#2 posted 08-13-2013 08:46 PM

Is that an extension cord? I’d heard/read not to use an extension cord for a 220v saw, but it would be much easier to just replace the plug on the existing R4512 cord than replace the entire cord. I already have the 12 guage cable, but I’m fine eating that cost if it means only replacing the plug and using an extension cord.

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

13529 posts in 1324 days


#3 posted 08-13-2013 09:57 PM

Good advice about making sure its unplugged. Yesterday I put a new cord on my jointer. The old cord was so short that I had to use an extension cord. I looked down and saw an unplugged extension cord so I got started. About 5 minutes in there was a flash. Not sure how I didn’t get shocked, but I didn’t. Did get a burn mark on my finger. Turned out there were two cords in the area and I looked at the wrong one. Thank god for breakers.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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Bluepine38

3341 posts in 2553 days


#4 posted 08-14-2013 02:36 PM

One reason someone might be saying not to use an extension cord for 220V is-if I read the code correctly-
any wire under 6 guage used for 220 must be color coded correctly, red and black for power, you can not
just color tape the ends of the wire as was formerly done-except for heavy duty generator cords they do
not tend to make 220V extension cords, not enough demand. I have not seen OSHA inspecting home
shops lately, so toolie’s instructions should be OK.

-- As ever, Gus-the 77 yr young apprentice carpenter

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toolie

2025 posts in 2096 days


#5 posted 08-14-2013 04:51 PM

personally, for something as simple as the 4512 power cord, i’d probably replace the cord from the switch to the outlet as i’m not real big on cutting molded plugs off wires if it can be avoided. i don’t like undertaking actions that can’t be easily and completely put back as they were. bit i’m pretty comfortable and knowledgeable around electric components, so it’s not a problem for me. if adhdan is more comfortable just replacing the plug on the existing switch wire, the extension cord i linked will work safely for the 4512.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4459 posts in 3428 days


#6 posted 08-14-2013 05:45 PM

I’ve been using a short extension (220 V) on my TS for several years. No probs, but it is a heavy 12/3 cord.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View ADHDan's profile

ADHDan

800 posts in 1576 days


#7 posted 08-14-2013 07:15 PM

Well, I had to wire the plug onto the 12 gauge cord I bought myself, so I’m pretty sure I could replace the factory plug – which is what the manual assumes for a DIY conversion. But on balance I really would prefer to have a single longer cord, and I’d like it to be thicker and better insulated than the factory cord.

My confidence in replacing this cord seems to swing back and forth day to day. I know it’s actually not a difficult project, but on the other hand I don’t want to do something wrong or overlook something and kill my saw or myself. I mean, if I’m going to get killed by my own table saw I want it to be in a Maximum Overdrive-style bloodbath, not a stupid electrical accident.

Maybe I’ll take a stab at it myself and then have a friend with more experience double-check my work.

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.

View toolie's profile

toolie

2025 posts in 2096 days


#8 posted 08-14-2013 09:03 PM

Maybe I’ll take a stab at it myself and then have a friend with more experience double-check my work.

sounds like a good idea. running the 220v wired motor on 110 shouldn’t hurt it. it’ll just run slower. so yo umight consider wiring the motor first, then testing it @ 110v. if it runs slowly, then the motor’s wired correctly for 220 (at least that was true for the dual voltage 3hp baldor motor that was on my briefly owned 70s vintage unisaw). replace the cord and test the switch connections for 220v before energizing. if the motor is wired correctly for 220v and the switch/cord combo support 220v, you should be good to go.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

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ADHDan

800 posts in 1576 days


#9 posted 08-14-2013 09:14 PM

Thanks for the advice. Another question – probably stupid, but what do I know. Is there any reason I should replace the cord between the motor and the switch when I replace the power cord? I would assume not, since the factory cords are already sufficient for 220v, but I just want to make sure.

If I have to replace that cord too, I’ll either just replace the plug or hire it out. Introducing more cord-swapping just means more chances for human error.

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.

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toolie

2025 posts in 2096 days


#10 posted 08-14-2013 10:37 PM

Is there any reason I should replace the cord between the motor and the switch when I replace the power cord?

absolutely none.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

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