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Adding brass to wood plane sole

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Forum topic by lateralus819 posted 08-12-2013 09:13 PM 931 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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lateralus819

1394 posts in 543 days


08-12-2013 09:13 PM

As i understand one of the drawbacks to wooden planes is that the wood breaks down over time and doesn’t hold up as well as steel. I was curious if adding a couple strips of brass to the bottom would add to the longevity of it?

-- Never confuse mistakes with failure. Kevin


8 replies so far

View Don W's profile

Don W

15029 posts in 1221 days


#1 posted 08-12-2013 09:40 PM

Yes it will. There are some vintage planes that added strips of wood to metal planes or metal to wooden planes.

And here is one I posted today. Made with the mahogany you gave me no less.

Click for details

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

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Loren

7554 posts in 2302 days


#2 posted 08-12-2013 10:25 PM

It can be done. The brass may mark some woods though.
Some makers of infill style planes these days are using
brass for the sides, so presumably marking occurs. It’s
not like it cannot be sanded out.

I have a bronze Lie Nielsen plane and it marks wood. If
the sole is freshly waxed marking isn’t a problem. Brass
and bronze don’t hold wax like iron does though so
the wax wears off quick.

Check wood planes on ebay and you’ll see some with
metal wear strips now and then. Bone also works and
these days I expect Corian would be a good choice. I’ve
made guitar nuts and saddles from Corian and it’s easier
to work with than bone but still plenty hard, tough and
consistent.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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lateralus819

1394 posts in 543 days


#3 posted 08-12-2013 10:33 PM

By marking what do you mean?

-- Never confuse mistakes with failure. Kevin

View lwllms's profile

lwllms

544 posts in 1935 days


#4 posted 08-12-2013 10:39 PM

Wood actually has better wear properties than brass. The one exception would be where you’re putting a lot of pressure over a small area like a spoke shave run over the sharp corners of stock. Wooden plane bodies exposed to harsh environments suffer from checking or expansion/contraction issues but metal planes also have problems when stored in such locations. Most of what is considered “wear” in wooden planes is actually the result of ham-fisted tuning through years of use.

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Don W

15029 posts in 1221 days


#5 posted 08-12-2013 11:10 PM

in reality if you use a good hard wood, unless you are using it everyday, I doubt you’d wear one out doing woodworking as a hobby.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

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lateralus819

1394 posts in 543 days


#6 posted 08-12-2013 11:32 PM

Good point Don. I’m actually contemplating making one out of metal. I have access to a bunch of milling equipment at work…hmmm.

-- Never confuse mistakes with failure. Kevin

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Don W

15029 posts in 1221 days


#7 posted 08-12-2013 11:33 PM

I have access to a bunch of milling equipment at work YOU SUCK!!

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

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lateralus819

1394 posts in 543 days


#8 posted 08-12-2013 11:36 PM

Lol. jet lathe, multiple mills, sheers, breaks, benders you name it lol. all kinds of welders. It’s good to work at a place with carpentry,metal, and paint shops. Even sewing! hahaa

-- Never confuse mistakes with failure. Kevin

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