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What species is this?? Wood Identification help

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Forum topic by palaswood posted 08-12-2013 07:03 AM 1121 views 0 times favorited 35 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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palaswood

777 posts in 403 days


08-12-2013 07:03 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question identification help reclaimed

Hi Wood lovers – I came upon some “trash” wood with some casters attached (not sure what it once was) in a dumpster, but the wood seemed in great shape with some good character beneath.

When I got it home and sanded it down, I was AMAZED at the figuring on these boards. Problem is I can’t for the life of me figure out what species of wood this is. I welcome any guesses. It’s relatively hard, but not too heavy.

Any suggestions or follow-up questions are greatly appreciated. Nice looking grain though, eh? I’m thinking tabletop, I have about 8 pieces.

Sanded to 400 grit and rubbed with Watco rejuvinating oil. Whats your best guess?

Joseph in Orange County, CA

-- Joseph, Lake Forest, CA, http://instagram.com/palas_woodcraft#


35 replies so far

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1127 posts in 1128 days


#1 posted 08-12-2013 12:28 PM

Here are four likely choices.

Osage Orange
Black Locust
Elm
Hackberry

Notice the wavy band pattern. That comes from the arrangement of the latewood pores in the annual growth ring. From the color in the pic, I would say osage orange or black locust, but both are heavy dense woods. Elm will be lighter and hackberry lighter still. If you look at a clean slice of the end grain cut with a razorblade, osage orange and black locust will have all the pores totally filled with tyloses, which is a crystalline-like material. Elm and hackberry will have some open pores.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln

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Ripthorn

757 posts in 1637 days


#2 posted 08-12-2013 12:57 PM

I would say black locust for three main reasons:

1. Osage orange usually isn’t found in clear boards of that size
2. Black locust is dirt cheap
3. Black locust is tough, so making something with casters on it is a good idea

And one bonus reason is the dark grain lines, osage doesn’t tend to have such dark grain lines, but that could be a factor of dirt and grime.

-- Brian T. - Exact science is not an exact science

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blackcherry

3161 posts in 2475 days


#3 posted 08-12-2013 02:29 PM

Has the look of Ash

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palaswood

777 posts in 403 days


#4 posted 08-12-2013 03:29 PM

The coloring is off due to the flash. Here are some natural light pics.

-- Joseph, Lake Forest, CA, http://instagram.com/palas_woodcraft#

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palaswood

777 posts in 403 days


#5 posted 08-12-2013 06:12 PM

Here are the best images i can get from this piece of gorgeous wood. What species is it?

I’m hearing black locust, any support or other guesses?

-- Joseph, Lake Forest, CA, http://instagram.com/palas_woodcraft#

View mporter's profile

mporter

234 posts in 1230 days


#6 posted 08-12-2013 06:19 PM

Got the Locust part right- but it is honey locust.

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

1033 posts in 786 days


#7 posted 08-12-2013 06:23 PM

When in doubt check this site out!

http://www.hobbithouseinc.com/personal/woodpics/

-- Bill

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darinS

382 posts in 1519 days


#8 posted 08-12-2013 06:25 PM

Either of these may help.

http://www.wood-database.com/wood-identification/

or

http://hobbithouseinc.com/personal/woodpics/

-- If at first you don't succeed, skydiving is not for you!

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palaswood

777 posts in 403 days


#9 posted 08-12-2013 06:39 PM

mporter, why are you so sure its honey locust? I have yet to see any images of honeylocust exhibiting such characteristics. do you maybe have a pic you can post? much obliged!

-- Joseph, Lake Forest, CA, http://instagram.com/palas_woodcraft#

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palaswood

777 posts in 403 days


#10 posted 08-12-2013 06:46 PM

the honey locust pics on hobbithouse look darn close. THANKS LUMBERJOCKS!

-- Joseph, Lake Forest, CA, http://instagram.com/palas_woodcraft#

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1127 posts in 1128 days


#11 posted 08-13-2013 02:05 AM

Nope, it is tropical. The extra pics help a lot. I do not know tropical hardwoods or which part of the world it comes from, but I am sure that it is a tropical hardwood.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln

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mporter

234 posts in 1230 days


#12 posted 08-13-2013 01:20 PM

Man I don’t know-it could be tropical I guess, but I have a bunch of honey locust that looks just like that. It’s hard to tell from a pic.

Honey Locust has more of a yellow tint to it than black locust.

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palaswood

777 posts in 403 days


#13 posted 08-13-2013 06:09 PM

So I sanded down another board from the lot, and its pretty obviously different species here. Another site’s forum has guessed Lauan (loose term) AKA Meranti AKA Balau (all Shorea spp) (tropical southeast asian hardwood). I found this site:

http://www.wood168.com/data/dny.htm

Which is in chinese (THANKS GOOGLE TRANSLATE)

Scientific Name: Shorea obtusa
Family: Dipterocarps (Dipterocarpaceae)
Tradenames: Badu Meranti, Nanyang beech (Chinese name), Selangan batu (Indonesia, Sabah, Sarawak), Bangkirai (Indonesia), Balau (Malaysia, Indonesia), Yakal (Philippines).

Has many names. This is a good candidate I think.

here is the side-by-side images. Top is just sanded, bottom has a tiny bit of watco rejuvinating oil rubbed in

-- Joseph, Lake Forest, CA, http://instagram.com/palas_woodcraft#

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WDHLT15

1127 posts in 1128 days


#14 posted 08-14-2013 02:53 AM

Tropical…................................

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln

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palaswood

777 posts in 403 days


#15 posted 08-14-2013 06:57 PM

I have an updated photo from another board from that lot, and its got some bright orange figuring ala mulberry or osage orange.

I decided its less important to know what species it is, and to spend more time working the actual wood into something beautiful and useful.

Thanks everyone.

-- Joseph, Lake Forest, CA, http://instagram.com/palas_woodcraft#

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