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Forum topic by Jofa posted 08-10-2013 08:57 PM 975 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jofa

272 posts in 1299 days


08-10-2013 08:57 PM

Hey guys.

I’m trying to make the following, repeatable cut and I’m having some trouble with my jigsaw.

The overall size of each cut is roughly 8”x1” with rounded ends. The jigsaw is giving me trouble making tight turns at the ends.

I thought I could use a 1” drill bit to bore out each end and them meet them up with the jigsaw but I was wondering if any of you had better suggestions. Thanks.

-- Thank you Lord for the passion and ability to make things from your creation.


16 replies so far

View teejk's profile

teejk

1215 posts in 2145 days


#1 posted 08-10-2013 09:00 PM

Sounds like a plunge router cut to me. Mount the piece securely in a bench and use scraps to make your fences.

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

3599 posts in 1948 days


#2 posted 08-10-2013 09:01 PM

Router and what ever sized bit you have times number of passes.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

7698 posts in 2303 days


#3 posted 08-10-2013 09:05 PM

And if you don’t have a router use a straight edge to guide the saw from hole to hole.

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

13448 posts in 1317 days


#4 posted 08-10-2013 09:17 PM

Aside from the router with a pattern, I would say use the drill bits like you mentioned for your ends. Then attach a straight edge along the sides as Thomas suggested so that the base of the saw can ride against it and cut a straight line. When you drill the holes only go far enough that the pilot breaks through and then flip the piece over to finish to avoid tear out when the bit breaks through.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View MrFid's profile

MrFid

804 posts in 1365 days


#5 posted 08-10-2013 09:23 PM

I’d do like a mortise and set your fence on your drill press to the distance that’ll allow you to cut the initial holes. Then make subsequent holes all the way along, then use a chisel to clean up the sides of the cut.

-- Bailey F - Eastern Mass.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115202 posts in 3038 days


#6 posted 08-10-2013 09:45 PM

I agree with the plunge router approach .

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2151 days


#7 posted 08-11-2013 01:43 AM

Template and plunge router.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View teejk's profile

teejk

1215 posts in 2145 days


#8 posted 08-11-2013 04:00 PM

gfadvm…I agree that a template would be worth the time if he as a lot of them to make. Design it to utilize a guide bushing and he’ll make quick work out of it. Carefully planned out he should be able to flip the template and get both outside edges with a single slot in the template.

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

7698 posts in 2303 days


#9 posted 08-11-2013 04:08 PM

May not have a router? Hasn’t responded?

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View Jofa's profile

Jofa

272 posts in 1299 days


#10 posted 08-11-2013 04:46 PM

Hey guys, thanks for the responses.

I tried a test run on a scrap piece using a 1” drill bit and the jigsaw. It came out pretty good. I don’t have a plunge router and the only router I have is mounted on a table. It’s kind of big so I was looking into maybe grabbing a trim router and slowly adjusting the depth to make the cuts from a template. A buddy if mine at church today gave me a HD gift card that one of his distributors gave him (he’s not really a home improvement guy) so I’m probably going to hit HD this afternoon. I’m looking at the Bosch 1hp electric palm router. Or do I definitely need a plunge router for this?

Thanks again for the awesome direction everyone!

-- Thank you Lord for the passion and ability to make things from your creation.

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

7698 posts in 2303 days


#11 posted 08-11-2013 05:07 PM

sounds like a plan! routers are very versatile. YouDepending on what you plan to do, and how much is in your pockets. LOL! You can get a porter cable that has a plunge router and regular router base.

If you plan to work with bigger dimensions and hard woods a larger router is warrented.

You can do stop cuts on your router table. That is a beginning and end cut, and slowly rout the cut. two passes for safety and being easy on your router and bits.

It would require only one stop block set up and changing a rigged fence or your table fence.

Whatever you choose, Be safe. Have fun!

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View Bluepine38's profile

Bluepine38

3341 posts in 2546 days


#12 posted 08-11-2013 05:23 PM

I have used a table router to make similar cuts, just mark the fence and the material where you want the bit
to start and stop cutting, gently lower the wood onto the rotating bit and move it to the marks slowly but
fast enough to keep the wood from burning. Increase the depth of cut until you have removed all the
necessary wood. You will have to adjust the fence according the size of your bit and the width of the cut.
I now have a plunge router, and it makes life a little easier.

-- As ever, Gus-the 77 yr young apprentice carpenter

View MrFid's profile

MrFid

804 posts in 1365 days


#13 posted 08-11-2013 05:39 PM

Yeah if you have a router table that’s they way I’d go. My original suggestion was for if you didn’t have a router. Make some stop blocks and cut a few spacers to go between the blocks so that you can cut all three. Then depth adjust for safety.

-- Bailey F - Eastern Mass.

View Jofa's profile

Jofa

272 posts in 1299 days


#14 posted 08-12-2013 05:20 PM

Hey guys. Update.

Of late I’ve been socking some funds away because I needed to upgrade some of my old, lower quality tools for my business. I saw the responses here and thought the easiest way for me to go was to drill two 1” holes and meet them up with a straight edge using a jigsaw.

That said, my old Skil jigsaw just wasn’t cutting it (pun intended). The base plate never kept a true 90º setting and the saw part always seemed to throw an angle on my cuts. This has been going on for a while so I decided to grab a new one.

I got the Ryobi 4.8 amp jigsaw from Home Depot (model JS481L). I will be doing a review on this saw shortly. I looked at a couple of others and decided on the Ryobi because the base plate locking mechanism allowed for the most stable 90º cut out of the lower cost bunch. Plus it has a removable plastic skid plate which may allow me to set this saw up on a table in the near future (stay tuned). The cuts are absolutely effortless and dead on accurate. There’s an LED which really helps stay true to the line.

So, the whole thing worked out better than I expected. Here are a couple of pics from my phone (sorry for the poor quality).

I also hit it with a 1/4” roundover using my new Makita hand held router which worked like a charm.

Thanks again everyone for the great advice. It’s all genuinely appreciated!

-- Thank you Lord for the passion and ability to make things from your creation.

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firefighterontheside

13448 posts in 1317 days


#15 posted 08-12-2013 05:37 PM

Looks great, glad that worked out for you.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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