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My blade Comparison: Forrest WWII, Freud P410, & Freud LU84R011

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Forum topic by Marcus posted 08-10-2013 07:32 PM 2982 views 0 times favorited 3 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Marcus

1149 posts in 1487 days


08-10-2013 07:32 PM

I thought it would be fun to pit the Forrest WWII up against the Freud P410. I had a hard time choosing between the blades about a year ago and ended up with the Freud. It was in need of some sharpening so I sent it to an authorized Freud center, but in the meantime, got the itch and picked up the Forrest WWII. I wanted to compared these 2 against the stock blade that came with the G1023 table saw I bought last year, but couldnt track it down, so found my old Freud LU84R011 and put it in the mix instead.

Blade Details

Forrest WWII: About $125 New. I had only used this blade to make one or two cuts before this test. It was basically new out of the box.

Freud P410: About $100 new. Mine is about a year old. I actually just knicked my miter gauge, hence the need for sharpening. In my mind, a freshly sharpened Freud and a new Forrest would be about as close as I would ever get to testing these two new. When I got the blade back, it was scary how sharp it was. I actually sliced my finger accidentally on a tip, first time that had ever happend.

Freud LU84R011: About $65 new. I dont know the details on this one. I know I used it for about a year, never sharpened it. It seems to be in pretty good shape except for in need of a serious cleaning.

The Victim
I bought this curly maple from a cabinet maker going out of business. I remember him telling me “be careful, that maple burns if you look at it wrong”. He was right and I’ve fought it since. I very rarely have burns after cutting lumber except w/ this wood.

As a side note, I am not SUPER anal about setting up my table saw, but try to keep everything aligned pretty well. The blade is in line w/ the miter gauge and the fence kicks out at the end about .005”.

Comparison

The dust shavings on these were all a bit different. The WWII spat out more chips than dust. The P410 created mostly dust but a few nice shavings. The LU84 was all dust.

WWII

P410

LU84

Next I made a thin cut of 1/32 with each of these. My rankings are as follows
WWII
9/10
Smooth/Even

P410
7/10
1 minor swirl mark, Even

LU84
5/10
Tough to push, inconsistent cut, swirl marks.

Cross Cut
WWII
9/10 Smooth
7/10 Tear Out

P410
9/10 Smooth
9/10 Tear Out

LU84
6/10 Smooth
7/10 Tear Out

Dado
I through this category in although I never make finish cuts like this with these blades. I notice it seems to show tear out though, so did it here.

WWII
6/10

P410
9/10

LU84
6/10

Ripping
WWII
9/10 Smooth
8/10 Burn

P410
8/10 Smooth (a few more rough tear out spots)
6/10 Burn

LU84
4/10 Smooth
5/10 Burn

So what did I prove here? Not much other than I can come up with some interesting ways to get out of mowing the lawn. For me personally, I think Im going to use the WWII for the time being. I think it did the best with ripping which is alot of what I use the table saw for. I was kind of surprised at how the P410 did with ripping, so maybe a freshly sharpened blade isnt equivalent to a new blade. The LU84 will probably sit in a corner indefinitely. Now only did not not rate up there with the big boys, I could tell I had to push significantly harder to get it to cut. A good sharpening might do it wonders though.


3 replies so far

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7224 posts in 2843 days


#1 posted 08-10-2013 08:23 PM

I can’t think of a better reason not to mow the lawn! Maple is very prone to burning, and the P410 has a dual side grind which puts more of the side of the tooth against the wood…. which can also increase burning (unless the sharpener change that parameter). Try a few different species of wood, and try a slightly higher blade height….those variables could change your results.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7160 posts in 2381 days


#2 posted 08-11-2013 01:28 AM

In my limited TS blade experience, I find the “feed rate” to an important factor in controlling burning on maple. I also find that with my two push-stick feeding, that I can actually cause more burning if I apply too much pressure on the left stick (holding down and against the fence).

BTW, I am now using much more Bostik Dricote (now labeled “BladeCote”). This does seem to help in my case.
http://compare.ebay.com/like/321078517815?var=lv&ltyp=AllFixedPriceItemTypes&var=sbar

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View Marcus's profile

Marcus

1149 posts in 1487 days


#3 posted 08-11-2013 03:07 AM

Don’t get me wrong, I’d be happy with either of the top two blades. I just wanted to do a real world comparison between the two in a situation where I know there would be issues (burning on maple). Maybe give someone else out there something to think about if they’re considering these two blades.

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