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Forum topic by RussellAP posted 08-10-2013 01:55 PM 1017 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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RussellAP

2959 posts in 971 days


08-10-2013 01:55 PM

I have a client who has asked me about making this chair.
It looks to be made of reclaimed lumber and anything I make will not look at all like this for about 5 years or so.

I don’t want to mislead this client and make something new out of cedar, because it just won’t work.

Is there anyway to get wood to look like this without using barn lumber. Perhaps another kind of wood that turns grey sooner?

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.


21 replies so far

View camps764's profile

camps764

800 posts in 1045 days


#1 posted 08-10-2013 02:03 PM

craigslist sometimes has people tearing down decks and giving away the lumber, you could potentially source some material this way.

-- Steve. Visit my website http://www.campbellwoodworking.com

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

2959 posts in 971 days


#2 posted 08-10-2013 02:06 PM

Camps, seeing it came from a calendar, I cant even tell what kind of wood it is. I could make it out of walnut, which would look similar to this after just a bit of weathering, however the longevity of walnut as a garden chair is dubious. I have a neighbor who has some 5/4 walnut that has been outside for years.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View TravisH's profile

TravisH

238 posts in 620 days


#3 posted 08-10-2013 02:07 PM

I have been looking at using the following for such an application.

http://www.valhalco.com/index.php

Vinegar and steel wool treatment also would work on a cedar piece.

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

4823 posts in 541 days


#4 posted 08-10-2013 02:21 PM

If that’s something that’s gonna be outside, I would make sure that it was built out of something that weathers well for the sake of longevity and consider trying to age it. For me, I don’t like the look of things that are finished to look aged. I can tell the difference. Perhaps the vinegar and steel wool thing would work since it ages the wood but then you go over the top of it with a regular finish. I would build it out of cypress. Not too expensive, naturally rot resistant and I think is stronger than western red cedar.

-- Bill M. I love my job as a firefighter, but nothing gives me the satisfaction of running my hand over a project that I have built and just finished sanding.

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RussellAP

2959 posts in 971 days


#5 posted 08-10-2013 02:24 PM

firefighterontheside, The problem around here is getting cypress or for that matter anything thicker than 5/4 in WRC.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

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firefighterontheside

4823 posts in 541 days


#6 posted 08-10-2013 02:38 PM

I’m in St Louis and I get it from Illinois, but that’s a pretty long drive from Lees Summit. Ive never used it for outside, but everyone talks about how good white oak does outside. Probably the more expensive option, but you could always offer it to the client if you can get that.

-- Bill M. I love my job as a firefighter, but nothing gives me the satisfaction of running my hand over a project that I have built and just finished sanding.

View CharlesNeil's profile

CharlesNeil

1128 posts in 2555 days


#7 posted 08-10-2013 02:45 PM

Russell

Can’t see the chair that well, but if you can get some white oak, or yellow pine feel pretty sure I can help you get the “aging ” , not very difficult, be glad to help you . White oak is an excellent exterior wood.

View RobynHoodridge's profile

RobynHoodridge

126 posts in 1014 days


#8 posted 08-10-2013 03:39 PM

Russel,
First and most important is to know for sure what the commissioner wants. (You probably know this, i’m just checking.)
Do they want exactly what’s in the picture cause the chair has to colour-match to a setting? Or do they want just the form of the pictured chair? Like FireFighter i don’t enjoy a faked aged finish, but maybe that’s exactly what the commissioner wants.
The pic looks a lot like enhanced / exposed grain with paint over it. And if THAT’s what they want then i could give you advice on differentially wearing the early and late growth fingerprints of the wood. To come out looking something like this: http://www.robynhoodridge.co.za/homeware/sangomas-sideplate.htm
And then CharlesNeil could probably give better advise on coating it than i could.

-- Never is longer than forever.

View Loren's profile

Loren

7714 posts in 2333 days


#9 posted 08-10-2013 03:44 PM

Leave it out in moisture and sun and it will age
pretty quick. I reckon you can get the client to
accept the geometry of the form and let nature
takes its course.

The client may want to keep the chair indoors
but have it look old, and then you may have a problem.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112289 posts in 2262 days


#10 posted 08-10-2013 03:51 PM

Since you have Charles on the case I’m sure you’ll get the results you want. The photo looks like it could be aged cedar
and parts of the chair looks like it’s been stained, white oak would be much stronger but perhaps a lot harder to find as used materiel.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View jdmaher's profile

jdmaher

288 posts in 1264 days


#11 posted 08-10-2013 04:01 PM

To me, that LOOKS like weathered mahogany. If it’s at all recent, it is more likely to be stained teak. Both of those are expensive options.

If I were doing it – and Charles said he could make White Oak look right, I’d do it in White Oak. Also not “cheap”, but definitely cheaper.

For any of these options, I’d encourage the client to place the piece with as much protection as practical (in a “four season room”, in the garage for winter, etc.). It IS a pretty piece.

-- Jim Maher, Illinois

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

2959 posts in 971 days


#12 posted 08-10-2013 04:29 PM

CharlesNeil, I believe my new sawyer has white oak, and probably can hook me up with the dimensions I need to boot.
How long to you think white oak takes to age to the point of that picture?

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View CharlesNeil's profile

CharlesNeil

1128 posts in 2555 days


#13 posted 08-10-2013 05:01 PM

Russell ,

Uh, well uh, maybe 30 min or so :) .. We have tricks ya know ( laughing )

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

2959 posts in 971 days


#14 posted 08-10-2013 07:35 PM

After discussing this with Charles, I’m going to get some white vinegar and I probably have steel wool around here somewhere. I’ll experiment with some white oak as soon as my sawyer gets back to me with the prices.

I’d really love to do this job, I have no idea what the price will be yet, but after I get the wood quote it will be much easier to come up with a price.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112289 posts in 2262 days


#15 posted 08-10-2013 07:54 PM

I just talked to Charles a little while ago and asked the same question He said to use Ferrous sulfate ( iron vitamin supplement ) , dissolved in water because that it was more gray in color verses using vinegar and steel wool comes out more black in color . You might do a test with both and see what you think.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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