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variable speed feed for planer

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Forum topic by Shawn Masterson posted 08-05-2013 02:35 AM 1156 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Shawn Masterson

1297 posts in 1408 days


08-05-2013 02:35 AM

Topic tags/keywords: planer lathe plane sander refurbishing turning dc dc motor treadmill motor

I have been reading how people have been using treadmill motors to make old lathes variable speed. I have also been researching end grain cutting boards and how you can’t run them through a planer due to tearout. I was wondering if I could slow the feed rate of my planer to a crawl if I could run an end grain board thru it. I understand that the end of it would tear out, but I could figure that into the build. Also by slowing down the feed rate I could get a nicer final cut for regular planing. The way my planer is constructed all I would need to do is make a motor mount and change the belt around. it would look factory from the outside. The pulley on the end of the cutter head is like 2 1/2”, so if I started with that on the dc TM motor I should be close. My major concern is by slowing the dc motor will I lose torque ? I would be slowing it from full speed since I am going through 90% of the factory gear reduction. I was looking to you all for any Ideas, thoughts, or personal experiences. Thanks in advance.


9 replies so far

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Shawn Masterson

1297 posts in 1408 days


#1 posted 08-05-2013 12:05 PM

just looking for a little thought.

View bowedstraight's profile

bowedstraight

100 posts in 1233 days


#2 posted 08-05-2013 01:10 PM

I use a router with a jig and a 2 inch planer bit works really good, cutting boards are tricky to plane and do a good job, really need a 20 in planer to do cutting boards that way you can put wood on the side of the cutting boards and get rid of the snipe I guess sacraficial sides on the cutting board but my cutting boards are 13.5×18 or so

-- Work in the city woodshop in tha country

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Shawn Masterson

1297 posts in 1408 days


#3 posted 08-05-2013 07:46 PM

thats what I have

sorry its sideways I don’t know how to fix it

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PurpLev

8523 posts in 3108 days


#4 posted 08-05-2013 07:57 PM

using the right tool for the job makes all the difference.

I feel that this is one case where a planer is simply the WRONG tool for the job and raises safety issues. I could care less about tear out , but more concerned about the 15” long blade catching an end grain and kicks back the entire board out – at itself breaking the planer, or at a door/wall/other near by – or worse – at you. is it really worth that risk?

there are far safer and more doable solutions to this. a router sled is the most affordable and takes the least storage space. a thickness sander is another choice but will require floor space and $$$ to buy, or time to build one. – I would go with either of those and never attempt to run end grain through a planer. (yes I know some do it, but to me it just does not worth the risk)

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

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Loren

8295 posts in 3108 days


#5 posted 08-05-2013 08:06 PM

Bad idea, imo.

Build yourself a stroke sander.

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Shawn Masterson

1297 posts in 1408 days


#6 posted 08-05-2013 08:27 PM

I agree on the danger factor. That was why I thought of slowing the feed rate. If I slowed it to a crawl would that take out the danger factor?

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Loren

8295 posts in 3108 days


#7 posted 08-05-2013 08:34 PM

In my opinion the geometry of the way a planer knife
hits end grain is just not good. Planer knives can
be back-beveled to deliver a type 2 chip (scrape),
which can be used to address what amounts to end
grain in long-grain boards; the tissue distortions than
cause birds eye and other unusual figures.

Woodmaster planers have a variable speed DC gearmotor,
but I’ve never seen this cited as a solution to thicknessing
end grain glue ups.

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PurpLev

8523 posts in 3108 days


#8 posted 08-05-2013 08:53 PM

you are only going to slow down the feed, but the planer cutterhead will still run at a high RPM – and if it will catch, it will have just the same destructive effect on it’s surrounding.

yes there is an “IF” in this sentence, but an “IF” that is better to avoid.

If this was the ONLY way to thickness endgrain glueups – I would say – heck, go for it, just make sure you wear a helmet and stand in the next room until it’s done… but it isn’t the only way… simply put- there are safer easier ways to accomplish the task at hand.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

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Shawn Masterson

1297 posts in 1408 days


#9 posted 08-05-2013 10:32 PM

got it I was just trying to think outside the box. thanks for the input.

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