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Forum topic by CBC_North posted 08-04-2013 11:24 AM 1515 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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CBC_North

3 posts in 1217 days


08-04-2013 11:24 AM

Topic tags/keywords: gaming table table

Hi All,

Fairly new to woodworking and am looking to take on a fairly large project. I’m looking to build a gaming table and have decided to design my own based heavily off the geek chiq “vizier” gaming table:

http://www.geekchichq.com/the-vizier-gaming-table.html

I’m currently laying out the plans for the table in sketchup. I’m fairly inexperienced in joinery and am looking to get some opinions on what the best way to join some of parts would be. Despite my inexperience I would rather take some time and learn to get this completed in the “best” way, even it that isn’t the easiest for a newbie.

Below is an overall picture of the design so far. The structure of each side is basically made of two boards joined along their edge at a 90 degree angle. Hinged desks can help add strength to this structure but my main concern is how to make the joint along edge “A”. Edge “B” is less important structurally but still needs to be joined to attach the sides of the table to the end.

I’ve exploded some of the parts in the next picture. I wanted to show my thoughts on how to attach the table legs while still allowing them to be removable. I came up with two sliding dovetails on each leg. I would not use glue on the joints but instead pin it in with some dowels. That way they could be removed in the event that I needed to move the table through a door when I move. The dowels would not bear any weight, they would just be there to make sure the legs couldn’t slide out when the table was lifted (even though it shouldn’t if the dovetails are tight) Just wondering what you think of this plan, or if you know of a better way.

Finally, I have a close up of the hinged desks. Again I’m planning on using a sliding dovetail to attach the uprights to the main structure of the table at edge “D”. If I use the sliding dovetail on “D”, what would be the best way to make the join at edge “F”?

Thanks in advance for your input.

Edit: Resized the pictures as they got butchered when I linked them.


7 replies so far

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firefighterontheside

13444 posts in 1317 days


#1 posted 08-04-2013 01:19 PM

If it were me, i would use glue and screws. It will be a very strong joint and the only one to see tje screws will be babies on their knees. I like to use hidden joinery where necessary and simple glue and screws where possible. Some people like the challenge of using no mechanical fasteners and fancy joinery everywhere. I am not one of those people. I build cabinet face frames with pocket hole screws because no one is going to climb into the cabinet and look back at the back of the frames. Most likely he/she is going to say, “what am i doing in here?”.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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firefighterontheside

13444 posts in 1317 days


#2 posted 08-04-2013 01:23 PM

Just realized you may have been also asking about where the B pieces meet at the corners. For that i would use biscuits.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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CBC_North

3 posts in 1217 days


#3 posted 08-04-2013 01:49 PM

Hi Bill (assuming that is your name from your signature),
I thought about using biscuit joints as that is the one type of joint I am familiar with. I used biscuits to put together a pair of speakers last year and they turned out pretty good. That me be what I end up using for joint “B”.

As for the screws, I had thought about that as well, however, I’d like to get into some of the “fancier” joinery with this project. I’d like to be able to dry fit most of this table without glue or screws. It’s really meant to be a learning experience for me that I can take my time with and play around with some different aspects of woodworking.

View Shawn Masterson's profile

Shawn Masterson

1297 posts in 1409 days


#4 posted 08-04-2013 02:10 PM

At the A joint glue and screws, at the B joint you could do biscuits, dowels, or even mortise and tenon. as for the legs I would run them to the top of the skirt.

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CBC_North

3 posts in 1217 days


#5 posted 08-04-2013 02:14 PM

I can’t actually run the legs to the top of the skirt. There is a recessed playing surface, a pit if you will, under the false top of the table. Much like in the link of the table I’m using for inspiration.

Would you still use the sliding dovetails if the legs ran to the top of the skirt or would you join them a different way?

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firefighterontheside

13444 posts in 1317 days


#6 posted 08-04-2013 02:21 PM

Ditto on the legs, otherwise they’re gonna be wobbly. The joint at F would have to be something like biscuits or mortise and tenon.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View Tommy Evans's profile

Tommy Evans

137 posts in 1634 days


#7 posted 08-05-2013 10:58 AM

I would worry a bit about having sliding dovetails on the legs which are right on top of the finger joints for the skirt corners. They may interfere with each other. Maybe think about placing the legs to the outside using leg braces.

https://www.google.com/search?q=table+leg+braces&newwindow=1&safe=off&rlz=1C1TSNPenUS465US465&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=v4PUeOPHsnmqgHX7IG4Cw&ved=0CAkQ_AUoAQ&biw=1241&bih=590

Tommy

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