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Straightening Craftsman cast iron wings

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Forum topic by Craftsman70 posted 08-02-2013 02:08 PM 1144 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Craftsman70

243 posts in 1589 days


08-02-2013 02:08 PM

I’m finishing up fixing up my old Craftsman 113 and when I put the webbed cast iron wings on I noticed they are not as flat as the main table. They dip in the middle so that when I flush the front and back with the table, the middle of the wings dips about 1/16th. I can reduce that to 1/32 with clamps but was afraid I might cause a bow in the main table.

So I was thinking of taking the wings off and putting them face to face against each other so the gap is in the middle and then clamping them to make them flat. Now I bet they’ll go right back to their concave shape when I remove the clamps. Should I try putting a 1/16th shim on the ends and then clamp the middle to try to bend them straight?


13 replies so far

View Charlie's profile

Charlie

1100 posts in 1750 days


#1 posted 08-02-2013 02:13 PM

You’ll crack ‘em before you bend ‘em.

View rrww's profile

rrww

263 posts in 1577 days


#2 posted 08-02-2013 02:16 PM

Only way to truly fix that is have them machined flat. Cast iron is brittle.

View distrbd's profile

distrbd

2227 posts in 1910 days


#3 posted 08-02-2013 03:02 PM

If you can have them machined properly ,that’s the way I would do it.have you considered grinding it yourself?or drilling and tapping an angle iron to the back side of it?

-- Ken from Ontario, Canada

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Craftsman70

243 posts in 1589 days


#4 posted 08-02-2013 05:28 PM

Being webbed Craftsman wings, I doubt they are worth my paying to have them ground. I might try the angle iron idea and if one breaks I’ll just pick up another used one somewhere.

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PurpLev

8523 posts in 3113 days


#5 posted 08-02-2013 05:46 PM

the area that really needs to be inline with the main table are the ends of the extension tables to support longer (than the table) boards. a dip in the center of the extensions will have no effect on rips/crosscuts on the TS – I would not worry about it. if you had a high spot in the center I would say grind/file/sand it down, but a dip is a no issue. you are good to go!

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View toolie's profile

toolie

2024 posts in 2092 days


#6 posted 08-03-2013 02:17 AM

how about a pic of the problem wings mounted to the aw table?

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

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Craftsman70

243 posts in 1589 days


#7 posted 08-03-2013 05:11 AM

I’ll see if I can get a pic over the weekend. Its fairly simple though…the wings bow at the center and so the center of the wings sit 1/16th below the table.

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toolie

2024 posts in 2092 days


#8 posted 08-03-2013 10:51 AM

when wood magazine did their 3hp cabinet saw test, in either the same or the next issue, they did a feature on cabinet saw set up. they used either a jack or a cabinet clamp reversed for a spreader to nudge the center of a wing into alignment with the table top. i have two similar saws, one with webbed CI wings and one one with solid CI wings. i used the wood techniques on both with success.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

View Charlie's profile

Charlie

1100 posts in 1750 days


#9 posted 08-03-2013 11:26 AM

If you’re ripping, the wings barely come into play. As long as your main table is flat, you’re good. If you’re crosscutting, using a miter gauge, you’re doing a small piece and primarily on the main table, so you’re good. If cross cutting a longer piece you’re probably using a crosscut sled, so… you’re good. Cutting sheet goods to size for cabinets? I don’t think a 16th dish in the middle of the wing is going to affect anything.

If this was a hump, I’d be more concerned. If you just WANT to chase it and try to get it flat flat flat….. go for it, but I really think it’s a non-issue.

View johnstoneb's profile

johnstoneb

2143 posts in 1637 days


#10 posted 08-03-2013 02:00 PM

Are you sure they are cast iron and not cast aluminum. My 113 built in the early 80’s came with one cast aluminum and one pressed steel extension. If it is cast aluminum you might be able to bend it slightly to get it straight. Cast iron will break before it bends. I would like to get another cast extension. The ones I have found are all more money than I want to spend.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

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MrRon

3926 posts in 2707 days


#11 posted 08-03-2013 06:27 PM

You could try putting the wing concave side down in the oven and put it on self-clean mode for ah hour or two. Placing a weight on top might help flatten the wing.

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Craftsman70

243 posts in 1589 days


#12 posted 08-06-2013 02:29 AM

I ended up using four c-clamps per wing and got the wings to straighten and line up with the main table. I tightened the bolts and left the clamps on for a few hours. When I took the clamps off, the wings held straight.

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Grandpa

3256 posts in 2139 days


#13 posted 08-06-2013 03:11 AM

Watch them because they might migrate back. Cast iron does bend but it is usually in a bad direction. Car engines have been known to twist (the block). Seems impossible but it does happen.

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