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Finishing walnut dining table

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Forum topic by LoveWalnut posted 07-30-2013 06:19 AM 1139 views 1 time favorited 2 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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LoveWalnut

1 post in 1230 days


07-30-2013 06:19 AM

I’m working on the table top now and have already glued up the trestle base.

Finishing questions: (Planning on using Waterlox for the first time,)

Would it be easier to keep trestle base and table top separate until after finishing, or attach top and finish the whole thing at once.

If kept separate, would you finish the bottom of the table top and then wait, flip it over, and do the top later, or . . . .???

Just thinking of order of operations, knowing I’ll do multiple coats of Waterlox (wiping on), want good access to the different sections to finish, and want to keep the dust down in my garage.

The hard part is done—I made 6 Maloof style low back chairs with the Scott Morrison plans, and now making the table. I used the Rockler—Maloof finish on the chairs.

Thanks,
John


2 replies so far

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Rick M

7935 posts in 1848 days


#1 posted 07-30-2013 06:52 AM

Finish the top and bottom (at least one coat) in the same day otherwise the top may cup.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Charlie

1100 posts in 1754 days


#2 posted 07-30-2013 12:20 PM

Separate, yes!

Flip the top upside down. Finish the bottom. While it’s still wet, flip it and finish the top.

If you’re wiping this on with a pad or a rag, like I’ve seen on YouTube, you’re going to need at least 10 coats. If you apply with a lamb’s wool and put it on heavy like you’re doing a floor, you’ll only need 3 coats. :)

I’ve applied Waterlox with a pad/rag method, brush, and lamb’s wool floor finish applicator. Brush is the worst. Pad is not terrible but you need a lot of coats to get to the film thickness this is designed for, and lamb’s wool was best. With lamb’s wool it goes on heavy, levels itself out, and no sanding between coats unless you get dust or fuzzies in there that you want to remove.

Learned this by doing an 8 ft island counter top in my kitchen. Walnut.

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