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how do you handle long slender turnngs

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Forum topic by REO posted 07-28-2013 02:17 PM 1129 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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REO

889 posts in 1541 days


07-28-2013 02:17 PM

Topic tags/keywords: trick question lathe

It’s been a busy spring! the weather in MN is more unpredictable than usual. It jumped from frost in the AM’s to upper 70’s overnight. anyway I have a fellow that wants quite a few identical parts made. Lots of the same thing is kind of my thing. The parts are long and slender 9/16 dia and 11 inches long. They have a straight taper to 1/2”. After several attempts I finally found a way to keep them from chattering in the middle. I tried working from one end to the other. I tried very light finish cuts. I tried a very sharp pointed cutter to minimize the chip. I even went so far as to build a jig for the sander. I made a plate that was set at a taper to the bed of the sander that had a stop at the narrow end. The rounded stock was fed endwise against the direction of the sander with a drill spinning it on its lengthwise axis. When it hit the stop I removed the part. It did work well but I thought there had to be a better way. I may have quite a few of these to do. I have a lathe that I can do single pass on but I tore it down for a rebuild and haven’t had the time to get it back together. I finally ended up using a router much the same way as is used for pool cue buts. It works great! Wondering what others do or have done to get the job done in a similar situation.


14 replies so far

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JustJoe

1554 posts in 1506 days


#1 posted 07-28-2013 02:41 PM

I use a steadyrest. I turn a portion in the middle so it’s round and put the steadyrest on. Then I turn the rest round so I can move the steady rest as needed.

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a1Jim

115207 posts in 3045 days


#2 posted 07-28-2013 03:15 PM

As soon as I read what you were doing using a router came to mind. I don’t know why you couldn’t turn it as Joe suggest also.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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Wildwood

1887 posts in 1602 days


#3 posted 07-28-2013 03:23 PM

I made a two wheel steady similar to this design:

http://www.davidreedsmith.com/Articles/MagSteady/magsteady.htm

There are several designs on the web, but here are some other ideas.

http://www.woodturningonline.com/Turning/Turning_articles.php?catid=36

I lke two wheel design because does not get in the way as much as three & four wheel designs.

-- Bill

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REO

889 posts in 1541 days


#4 posted 07-28-2013 06:45 PM

The two wheelers are a good fit for many applications. As a production turner I need to save time. moving a steady rest into and out of play takes time. For a one off item the time doesn’t amount to much but over the course of several hundred or even thousands of parts I had to find a less cumbersome way. the finish is good also. one rough pass to get rid of the corners and one rough pass to just over finished size then one finish pass. still playing with whether climb or conventional cut works best. I might even be able to eliminate one pass as well.

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Wildwood

1887 posts in 1602 days


#5 posted 07-29-2013 01:44 PM

REO, you asked and we gave it our best!

Just go to Google Images and search steady rest, will find them in use on amateurs and commercial wood and metal lathes. Once a steady put in position normally not moved until job complete whether do one or thousand pieces.

This a woodturning thread when you mention chattering in the middle actually talking two different problems. Wood chatter on a wood lathe is one problem with a couple solutions, one is using a steady. Wood flexing, whipping, or bending anywhere is another problem where steady should help.

No, a steady rest is not always a solution and in fact can mar or burn your wood if not careful. My first single point made from wood steady did both. Some wheel steadies whether two, three, or four wheels steadies will go the same unless adjusted properly and using right wheels. Have seen but never used a steady rest Joe linked.

-- Bill

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REO

889 posts in 1541 days


#6 posted 07-30-2013 10:29 PM

I am familiar with several steady rests. I did not question their use as a solution to the problem. I was wondering what others have done as a solution. Wildwood if you have some insights to how to use the steady for start to finish enlighten me. If I am starting with a square piece and finishing with a round one how can this be done without moving the steady? You can’t set up on the square with a steady. Once set up for a size it needs to ba adjusted as the diameter changes to be effective. If you turn to a finished dimension and then adjust for that size to finish the item it will need to be moved out of the way when starting a new turning. I didn’t ask because I didn’t have a solution , I asked for those who may face a similar problem.

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Arlin Eastman

3557 posts in 2029 days


#7 posted 08-01-2013 04:43 AM

Roger

I have done hair sticks for womens hair, wooden chop sticks, and knitting needles.

This is how I do it. I start turning from the center to the tail stick to within 3/16 and leave the 1” at the end large.
Then I go from the middle to the headstock and take it little by little until I hit the 1” end piece. Then I either shape the tail piece or head piece and take the other side to the minimual size needed.

When you come over I can show you and then let you do a few also. I have done about 150 hair sticks which are 3/16” to 1/8” from 8” to 12” long.

If you need more info please call me you know my phone number.

All the Best
Arlin

PS – I have never used a steady rest and will not until I get to the big stuff. Then I will buy one.

-- Please help me help other Vets click..> http://www.gofundme.com/m1abko.....It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

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hairy

2384 posts in 3000 days


#8 posted 08-01-2013 11:54 AM

You do productions runs of thousands, I don’t. What works for me won’t help you, but I do have some food for thought. From what I’ve seen, you have a well equipped shop and skills to build lathes and a view of turning that most of us don’t ever see.

Pressure from the tailstock contributes to wobble as the spindle diameter decreases. Maybe, instead of pushing, your tailstock pulled. Tension vs. compression.

Think about a full length cutter on a pivot. Maybe using a planer blade.Put in the blank, swing the blade in til it stops, repeat all day long.

Keep in mind that I’m probably full of shit, but it’s what came to mind.

-- stay thirsty my friends...

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Wildwood

1887 posts in 1602 days


#9 posted 08-02-2013 12:49 PM

REO, when you marginalize responses to your questions, have no enlightenment for you!

-- Bill

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JustJoe

1554 posts in 1506 days


#10 posted 08-02-2013 01:23 PM

How did this turn into an attack on the OP? He wasn’t really asking for solutions – he found his (router) and was wondering what everyone else did.

We told him what we did (steady rests) and he replied why it didn’t work for his application (time constraints).
I see nothing wrong with that. What works for me, a retiree with more time than money, making single items for relatives, isn’t necessarily the same thing that’s going to work for someone who has to crank out 200 an hour if he wants to make a slim profit.

Back to the flexing now:
I have seen skilled turners, of which I am not, use a skew chisel in one hand, while the other hand is draped loosely over the part with the fatter pad of the hand and the thumb in front of the steadyrest and then one or more fingers gently holding the part steady while they make the cut. I can’t skew, so I haven’t tried it but I’ve seen it in person and in videos when making chair rungs or real small goblets.

Another idea is to fabricate your own follower rest of some sort. Usually used on a metalworking lathe, it follows the cutter so that the steadying pressure is always kept near where the cut is being made. It would have to be modified though with the wheels riding on springs so that as the diameter of the object is reduced, the springs push the wheels to automatically adjust to size. It shouldn’t take much pressure to reduce the vibrations, so the springs wouldn’t need to be super-duty. Heck, combine that with a cheap metal lathe and a home-made taper attachment and you could crank out repeated parts all day long.

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Wildwood

1887 posts in 1602 days


#11 posted 08-02-2013 10:27 PM

JustJoe, not a personal attack more like professional differences, think said steady rest will not work in every situation.

Finding one of the earlier Legacy mills on used tool market makes turning what REO is doing little more accurate than could do on my lathe but much slower.

http://ornamentalmills.com/history/index.html

Industrial steady rest operate in different ways usually a sub-system on industrial machines today. Those steadies can run alone or in combination by hydraulic, mechanical, electric, and with special programming. These steadies require positioning switches, pressure switches, timers and machine control interface.

Much easier to make your own version of a legacy mill for your wood lathe. Have see several homemade versions turners have made and use successfully.

While this cable system has nothing to do with REO’s questions pretty cool.

http://jeffsturnedwood.com/Video.html

-- Bill

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higtron

207 posts in 2145 days


#12 posted 08-02-2013 11:12 PM

This might work a non lathe solution http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TUA3lryix64

-- A friend will help you move, a good friend will help you move a body

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REO

889 posts in 1541 days


#13 posted 08-03-2013 02:16 PM

I am out of state at themoment but whenI get back I will geta vid up of my set up. Wildwood brought up the legacy system which is very versatile and accurate but as he also mentioned very slow. I was not intending to demean any responses I apologize for coming across in that way. The planer blade idea is a cool thought as well.thatishow a curtain or back knife lathe works. The cutting edge actually is set up like a shear and contacts the work piece on a tangent, steady rests are introduced to the opposite side of the work at established intervals as the cutter finishes a section to finished size. Although I am able to use traditional tools and on occasion I do for the most part I use a single point tool to turn a piece. I have seen accomplished turners back up their turnings with one hand as has been brought up.it is just amazing how slender they can make a piece without ruining it! My dad turned for over 60 years and had several different typs of lathes for special operations. Over the years he condensed applications into one machine. One large lathe 2’x16’ capable and three small lathes 10” x32” capable. I am always looking for unique applications that others have developed for whatever reason.

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Arlin Eastman

3557 posts in 2029 days


#14 posted 08-03-2013 03:47 PM

REO

I have sent you afew messages. I am waiting for a response please.

Joe

Good job for helping the OP and wipeing out negitive comments from others.

Arlin

-- Please help me help other Vets click..> http://www.gofundme.com/m1abko.....It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

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