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Forum topic by ProDrawerCom posted 07-27-2013 06:56 PM 819 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ProDrawerCom

13 posts in 1561 days


07-27-2013 06:56 PM

I’m building cabinets for my kitchen. It’s time now for a hinge decision. I thought all along I would simply go with a euro-style hinge from Blum. They seem to be every one’s choice. I bought several models for testing. They all use the 35mm pocket in the door. I discovered two things that I don’t like. One is a certain number of degrees of free-motion as the door is flung open. I don’t fling doors but this is the only way I can describe the problem. This free motion where there is no damping allows the door to hit against its stop and then bounce back to the degree wherein damping begins. It then rebounds back to the stop, and so forth. I called cabinetparts.com where I got the hinges and was told that they had no recommendations. I called Blum two or three times and was told that a certain expert would call me. He never did.

The second problem is that the door wants to stop before closing, assuming that you’re counting on inertia to complete the close. And I think almost everyone does even without slamming them. The snap-close model stops the closure when it comes in contact with the self-closing spring. The soft-close model stops closing when it comes in contact with the damper responsible for the soft close.

This probably sounds petty, but I’d hate to find out later that there was a hinge that would eliminate these issues. If you have any experience with this, I’d appreciate your advice. Thanks.

Area 1 is where the door flops back and forth, Area 2 is where the door wants to stop when closing.


8 replies so far

View TCCcabinetmaker's profile

TCCcabinetmaker

930 posts in 1822 days


#1 posted 07-27-2013 07:03 PM

1. I prefer salice,they cost less and are easily of the same quality.
2. There are different types of hinges, and yes the way they swing that you are describing is an option, you probably want a self closing hinge instead of a free swinging hinge.
3. the hinges are designed for use with shelf bumps, however on this type of hinge you can also adjust the hinge in order to tweak how the door closes. You really don’t want the door to touch the face frame as finishes can stick and peel.

-- The mark of a good carpenter is not how few mistakes he makes, but rather how well he fixes them.

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ProDrawerCom

13 posts in 1561 days


#2 posted 07-27-2013 07:12 PM

Very interesting. I’m not sure I took one of your statements correctly though. ”... you can also adjust the hinge in order to tweak how the door closes.”

Are you saying that the Salice has this feature? Or, are you saying that I can adjust my Blums? My Blums have plenty of adjustments as I’m sure you know, but I don’t see any way of adjust them to get over the “hump” causing them to remain open when my wife tries to close the model I’ve built. If you’re talking about a Sallice feature that takes care of this problem—I’d sure like to have a link. Thank you very much.

View TCCcabinetmaker's profile

TCCcabinetmaker

930 posts in 1822 days


#3 posted 07-27-2013 07:35 PM

both the blum and the salice have that feature, they are adjusted in the hinge plates they have up and down, and front to back adjustments .

-- The mark of a good carpenter is not how few mistakes he makes, but rather how well he fixes them.

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ProDrawerCom

13 posts in 1561 days


#4 posted 07-27-2013 07:38 PM

Okay. I thought you were telling me I could adjust something to mitigate the no-close characteristic.

View TCCcabinetmaker's profile

TCCcabinetmaker

930 posts in 1822 days


#5 posted 07-27-2013 07:41 PM

yes, typically the front to back adjustment will do that, however you NEED drawer bumps on the doors.

-- The mark of a good carpenter is not how few mistakes he makes, but rather how well he fixes them.

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4459 posts in 3428 days


#6 posted 07-27-2013 08:03 PM

My prob with your post is the “fling open” statement. I have a big issue with anyone who throws open doors with no consideration as to stops. Same with those who just slam doors shut and complain that stiles won’t last thru repeated abuse.
Help us understand your application.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View Loren's profile

Loren

8315 posts in 3115 days


#7 posted 07-27-2013 08:16 PM

Sometimes cabinets have to be outfitted for group
homes and other institutional settings where the
cabinets will be abused by the clients. I don’t think
any 35mm hinge is up to this standard.

In my experience all the cup hinges have free motion
in the open position. The closing spring is disengaged
at a certain point in order for the door to remain
open if desired. If a person living in the household
cannot be trained not to fling the doors open,
I suggest a different style of hinge and boring all
the way though the doors and cabinet sides and
using machine screws. The screw holes may be
counter-drilled and plugged almost invisibly from the
outside.

View ProDrawerCom's profile

ProDrawerCom

13 posts in 1561 days


#8 posted 07-28-2013 01:48 AM

“yes, typically the front to back adjustment will do that, however you NEED drawer bumps on the doors.”
Okay. Gonna give that a whirl.

” I have a big issue with anyone who throws open doors with no consideration as to stops.”
I was exaggerating to make a point. It would be more correct to say that one might let go of the door when almost fully open. Then, inertia would allow it to enter the free-motion space. Some damping, something like an “o” ring inserted at the factory would eliminate this cheap, flimsy feel.

“In my experience all the cup hinges have free motion in the open position.” Knowing that actually helps. If the rest of the world is accustomed to it, it won’t be so noticeable on my cabs.

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