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Old Craftsman Wood Lathe - maybe 1935?

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Forum topic by elm posted 07-26-2013 09:47 PM 3166 views 0 times favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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elm

16 posts in 523 days


07-26-2013 09:47 PM

Topic tags/keywords: craftsman wood lathe lathe vintage tools missing parts

I posted this request to two folks who appear to have the tool about which I am inquiring. However, it appears that they have been inactive on these forums for well over one year. If anyone knows of SirBrian or ATLux, please try to bring this to their attention. Thanks.

I have been looking for information on a very old Craftsman wood lathe. I cannot find any model number. Most parts have part numbers cast into them. I have disassembled it to see exactly what I have vs need. Wonder if anyone can help me with a few issues?
I am looking for:
any manual that may have come with the lathe (no luck on vintagemachinery.org)
the tail stock clamp, part L2-7, someone used a hunkof steel plate instead
the correct tool rest, part number unknown, may be 9-333
the head stock base, part L2-2, part of it broke out, another one would be nice but not absolutely necessary.
What motor would you advise, hp, rpm, clockwise rotation, etc
Finally, can you suggest a way to remove really heavy rust before refinishing?
Thanks very much.

Ed


22 replies so far

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toolie

1773 posts in 1373 days


#1 posted 07-26-2013 09:51 PM

try these guys:

http://owwm.org/index.php

http://vintagemachinery.org/

or this forum:
http://www.forums.woodnet.net/ubbthreads/postlist.php?Cat=&Board=turning

i’d suspect a 1/2 or 3/4 HP motor would do well on that lathe.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

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JustJoe

1554 posts in 783 days


#2 posted 07-26-2013 09:55 PM

What is the tailstock number itself?

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elm

16 posts in 523 days


#3 posted 07-26-2013 10:02 PM

Tailstock is part L2-5.

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JustJoe

1554 posts in 783 days


#4 posted 07-26-2013 10:27 PM

neener neener

Oh yea – for something that small you can get a big plastic tub at Wally World and use a battery charger and some baking soda for electrolysis.

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elm

16 posts in 523 days


#5 posted 07-26-2013 10:40 PM

Joe,
Are you in the process of restoring to a working lathe?

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JustJoe

1554 posts in 783 days


#6 posted 07-26-2013 10:47 PM

No. I’ve got three working lathes already and parts of a small metal lathe I’m trying to decide what to do with. That’s just a tailstock that has been sitting on a shelf in the laundry room for the last four years. I keep telling people – the tools and parts are all around you, you just have to look. Now be honest – have you looked on the shelf in your laundry room? It may be different depending on the type of dwelling you live in, but in my home the top five places outside the workshop to find tools or parts of tools is
1. Under/on the dining room table.
2. In the laundry room.
3. Under the living room couch.
4. That closet near the bathroom, usually behind the TP and spare towels.
and for the real small parts -
5. Bedroom, nightstand drawer.

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elm

16 posts in 523 days


#7 posted 07-26-2013 10:54 PM

Is the tailstock clamp in the pic part L2-7? It looks like one of the parts I could use. If so, are you interested in working out some sort of arrangement for it?

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TerryDowning

1024 posts in 862 days


#8 posted 07-26-2013 11:14 PM

It looks like my 1939 Dunlap

-- - Terry

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Dakkar

297 posts in 672 days


#9 posted 07-27-2013 03:52 AM

That one looks close to one I picked up at a flea market back in the ‘80s and never got going. It was so hopelessly rusted I was never even able to change the belt. I’m afraid it made it’s way to the metal recyclers.

These days, I like the rust neutralizer you get at auto supply stores. It stops the rusting process and turns the rust black. The damage is still there, though, so you still have to sand it off.

View Rick M.'s profile

Rick M.

4477 posts in 1125 days


#10 posted 07-27-2013 04:43 AM

Ed, it probably came with 1/2HP motor but I’d recommend grabbing a DC motor from a treadmill and having variable speed. You can look at my blog to see what I’ve done.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Loren

7822 posts in 2392 days


#11 posted 07-27-2013 05:24 AM

That’s some funny stuff, Joe.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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JustJoe

1554 posts in 783 days


#12 posted 07-27-2013 12:57 PM

Loren – it’s the truth though. I’ve got an electrolysis tank bubbling away on the countertop where most people keep a toaster and a couple of block planes soaking in evaporust in the bathroom sink.

Ed – It doesn’t have any markings on it, but it looks original. The bottom is milled out for the bolt to sit in just right, it’s about 1.5” wide. The stepped portion that goes in the gap on the bed is 2.75” long and the unstepped portion that would sit on the bottom is about 3-3/8”. The bolt is just under 3” long and about 1/2” thick.

I’ve got another generic tailstock clamp that was sitting in my office on a shelt. That ones’s made for a skinnier lathe bed – the stepped portion on that one is just a shade over 2”.

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elm

16 posts in 523 days


#13 posted 07-27-2013 01:34 PM

Joe,
The 1.5” width is good. However, the rails are 1.75” wide. The stepped portion would have to fit that dimension. I have a 3/8” bolt. Nice try. If anything else shows up, please keep me in mind.
Thanks
Ed

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hairy

2108 posts in 2277 days


#14 posted 07-27-2013 01:48 PM

http://www.evaporust.com/evaporust.html?gclid=CNPrjvTmz7gCFa87MgodLmsAEw

This is good stuff. I get it at Harbor Freight. I used it on this old jointer.

-- in the confusion, I mighta grabbed the gold ...

View elm's profile

elm

16 posts in 523 days


#15 posted 07-28-2013 11:32 AM

Additional information from www.lathes.co.uk/craftsmanwood/. My model appears to be a cross between two models mentioned below, headstock from the 1st with bed and tailstock from the 2nd. Year, 1935 – 1936.

By 1935, and with the dropping of the Herberts “Wood Wizard” range, the entire range of Craftsman wood-turning lathes had been changed. The cheapest machine, illustrated below, was the 6-inch swing by 24 inches between centres model which, like its forebears, had a 5/8-inch spindle running in bronze bearings driven by a 3-step V pulley. Instead of a central foot, the cross-braced bed was deepened in section over its central portion. The price, at $4.85, remained below the crucial $5 mark.

First pic at — http://www.lathes.co.uk/craftsmanwood/img23.gif

Craftsman 6-inch x 24-inch wood-turning lathe of 1935 – this inexpensive model remained in the lists until 1938.

Second pic at — http://www.lathes.co.uk/craftsmanwood/img24.gif

1935 to 1936 Craftsman 9-inch lathe.
Unlike the earlier 9-inch lathe, with its ball-bearing headstock, this model made do with cheap “Oilite” porous-bronze bushes. However, the spindle was bored hollow, took a number 1 Morse-taper centre and could be fitted with a faceplate on its left-hand end for large-capacity bowl turning.. Unfortunately, the ring of 60 indexing holes on the headstock pulley was missing and the bed had lost its mid-way foot. However (and rather surprisingly) the tailstock could be set over for taper turning and a limited range of accessories – a compound slide rest, 3 and 4 jaw chucks and a fixed steady – was available to convert it into a metal-turning lathe.

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