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Can one bend wood with a curling iron?

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Forum topic by James posted 07-24-2013 05:25 PM 1849 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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James

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07-24-2013 05:25 PM

Can you?

-- James - Semper Fi


9 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

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#1 posted 07-24-2013 05:28 PM

Yes.

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James

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#2 posted 07-24-2013 05:33 PM

I like simple answers. But are there any concerns? Is it the same as the iron in a tail pipe device? Is it better or worse than steaming or wetting? In the future, answer my questions with 25 words or more. Kidding. But seriously, will I be happy with it?

-- James - Semper Fi

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Loren

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#3 posted 07-24-2013 05:45 PM

1. Yes. Only thin wood. Maybe 1.5mm thickness.

2. I doubt it. A hot pipe probably can be got hotter, but I don’t know how hot your curling iron gets. I stick a bolt with a couple of big washers in my hot pipe to keep heat from dissipating out the end – it improves the function.

3. wetting or spritzing sometimes helps with hot pipe bending. Steaming is for thicker wood but the wood will still break if you attempt more than a very mild bend without a backing strap.

4. If you want to bend veneer, maybe.

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James

102 posts in 1250 days


#4 posted 07-24-2013 06:02 PM

I’m bending 1/32-3/64 padauk. It’s pretty bendable already but I want it to keep the shape.

I don’t understand your bolt and washers thing, Loren.

All the videos I saw of hot pipe bending, the user wet the wood just before bending.

-- James - Semper Fi

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Loren

8302 posts in 3111 days


#5 posted 07-24-2013 06:12 PM

A stone would work… just something to fill the end of the
pipe so the heat from the torch stays inside.

I usually spritz with a spray bottle when pipe bending…
it’s an art and every piece of wood is different. There
are a lot of factors at play so it’s not easy to say how
much water is enough. If the wood gets too wet it
will break.

I recommend practicing on some common woods before
attempting exotics.

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James

102 posts in 1250 days


#6 posted 07-24-2013 06:19 PM

So if I were to say I have four pieces of padauk to use and I need two to work, which method of bending would be the most efficient considering I’ve never bent wood. Having said that I’ve never bent wood, I can do anything with a youtube video and a couple forum posts preparation… like this.

-- James - Semper Fi

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mahdee

3551 posts in 1230 days


#7 posted 07-24-2013 06:24 PM

Hi,
Best way for beding wood that I know of is to soak the wood in water over night before bending it. Pros: It bends very easily once heat is introduced and knots or waves in the wood will less likely to seperate. Cons: the wood grain will raise so some sanding is required. The wood may get darker.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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Ralph

166 posts in 1596 days


#8 posted 07-24-2013 06:24 PM

In the June 2009 (#205) issue of FWW, Michael Fortune describes how he bends wood on a heated section of 2” black pipe. He says he soaks the wood for about three hours, and that the thickest piece he bent was 3/8”.
Not exactly a curling iron, but he heats the section of pipe with a propane torch. He also says the proper temperature of the pipe is about 200°F.
Hope it helps.

-- The greatest risk is not taking one...

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James

102 posts in 1250 days


#9 posted 07-24-2013 07:19 PM

I’ll look that one up. I think with the thickness of my padauk, it should be fairly easy. And I have the two extra pieces to screw up. I’d love to get them both right so I could do all four and reinforce the sides with the extra wood.

-- James - Semper Fi

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