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Forum topic by Timberwerks posted 07-22-2013 09:07 PM 1739 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Timberwerks

306 posts in 1905 days


07-22-2013 09:07 PM

Almost ready to start milling again. Mill is assembled and I just need to break in the saw a bit more.

-- http://djofurnituremaker.wordpress.com/ & https://www.facebook.com/pages/Timberwerks-Studio/126415221682


13 replies so far

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Dan'um Style

13237 posts in 2727 days


#1 posted 07-22-2013 10:28 PM

good looking tool, but that is a nice saw in the back ground. What kind is it and what is blade size?

-- keeping myself entertained ... Humor and fun lubricate the brain

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Timberwerks

306 posts in 1905 days


#2 posted 07-22-2013 10:37 PM

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dahenley

127 posts in 837 days


#3 posted 07-22-2013 11:14 PM

what lube do you plan on running in that container.
i know regularly you run an oil based chain lube. but will oil inter-fear or effect the wood?

and bandsaws run water for cooling and lube. but would that hurt the chainsaw?

just curious.
thanks!!!

-- David Henley

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Timberwerks

306 posts in 1905 days


#4 posted 07-22-2013 11:18 PM

It’s just regular bar & chain oil. It mainly stays on the chain itself, what does stay on the wood will plane away with no problems or stains.

-- http://djofurnituremaker.wordpress.com/ & https://www.facebook.com/pages/Timberwerks-Studio/126415221682

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toddbeaulieu

413 posts in 1748 days


#5 posted 08-23-2013 06:43 PM

Hello,

I want to get a starter setup to experiment with. I have an echo 590, which is a 60cc 20” saw. Rumor has it I can buy a longer bar that’s sold for the 600 saw, which has the same engine.

Have you used this setup yet? I’d love to learn more.

I have to decide if I should just buy a setup for a 24” and limit myself, or if I should get something bigger to keep my options open. If I buy bigger, I can still run my smaller saw in it, right?

Thanks.

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hydro

208 posts in 496 days


#6 posted 08-24-2013 12:52 PM

Timberwerks, Looks like a nice setup and you should have plenty of power with that Stihl!

toddbealieu, with a 60cc saw I would run no more than a 30” bar and with that you will get about a 24” cut between the clamps of the mill assembly. I had a mill for many years, running a 70cc McCulloch and used a 28” bar. I cut more lumber than I could use and still have piles left today (I’m shrinking them steadily). A couple of notes as to what worked well for me:

1. Use a big chain. I used a .404 pitch skip tooth, sharpened with rakers and cutters alternating. Fewer cutters in the wood takes load off of the motor.
2. Learn to file the chain fast and accurately. You will need to sharpen it between every cut in a wide log.
3. Use lots of oil as you cut. I built my own mill and had a ½ gallon tank that usually needed refilling every couple of cuts. I just ran used crankcase motor oil to save $ and it worked fine. The chain needs plenty of lubrication. Remember to grease the bar tip roller between every cut.
4. Have a helper to pull on that end handle. Milling with a chain saw is a lot of work and wears you out. The planks are also very heavy and the helper is handy when moving them.
5. Remember that wide planks will likely warp, check, and split more than narrow ones so plan on that when cutting, stacking and drying.

Overall it’s a great way to get out and enjoy the process of cutting your own lumber!

-- Minnesota Woodworkers Guild, Past President, Lifetime member.

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Timberwerks

306 posts in 1905 days


#7 posted 08-24-2013 01:27 PM

Hi Guys

I pretty much agree with the above, however I would recommend using 3/8 pitch chain with the smaller power head. Maybe even go with a 26” bar. It would still get you a 20” cutting capacity. Consider these mills:

http://www.baileysonline.com/Forestry-Woodcutting/Portable-Sawmills/Micro-Mills/Granberg-Small-Log-Alaskan-Mill.axd

http://www.baileysonline.com/Forestry-Woodcutting/Portable-Sawmills/Granberg/Saw-Mills/Granberg-MK-III-Alaskan-Chainsaw-Mill-with-24-Rails.axd

Here are some photos of a Burr Oak I milled.

-- http://djofurnituremaker.wordpress.com/ & https://www.facebook.com/pages/Timberwerks-Studio/126415221682

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Timberwerks

306 posts in 1905 days


#8 posted 08-24-2013 01:29 PM

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hydro

208 posts in 496 days


#9 posted 08-24-2013 07:55 PM

Timberwerks, Note in my comment on chain I recommend a “Skip Tooth” profile. That has fewer teeth in the chain due to an extra link between cutters. For a smaller horsepower saw that can make a big difference, and the larger pitch will last a bit longer before the cutters are worn away.

-- Minnesota Woodworkers Guild, Past President, Lifetime member.

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Timberwerks

306 posts in 1905 days


#10 posted 08-24-2013 08:22 PM

Yes, but a 404 chain still takes power power to pull, extra weight, slightly larger kerf etc. Most with CMS will use the 3/8 for these reasons plus 3/8 will cut a bit faster. I use 404 because the extra kerf doesn’t bother me and 404 does not stretch as much. Smaller powerheads and mills are better off with 3/8, some guys even run low pro 3/8

Here is some good info:

http://www.arboristsite.com/milling-saw-mills/93458.htm

http://www.arboristsite.com/milling-saw-mills/137465.htm

-- http://djofurnituremaker.wordpress.com/ & https://www.facebook.com/pages/Timberwerks-Studio/126415221682

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toddbeaulieu

413 posts in 1748 days


#11 posted 08-26-2013 02:12 PM

Wow. Fantastic information in these posts. Thanks!!!

I’ve been looking through the mentioned threads. I didn’t realize there would be this much information on using this setup.

I’ll figure out the chain and I guess I need that oiler ($60). So did I read correctly that I should max out the self oiler in addition to the aux oiler, or should I not bother with the self oiler when using the aux oiler? Seems like the self oiler would be pointless to me.

The echo 600 goes up to a 27” bar, so I’ll get that and the 30” mill. At this point I’m not looking for wide boards as much as the capacity to process larger trees. This is really just an experiment/hobby for me. I can’t stop thinking about processing trees that I come across. I have a 20” elm that’s spalting (just 5 ft long) in my yard, a pretty good sized cedar and a number of large hardwoods that I could take on. Hate to see them go to waste.

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Timberwerks

306 posts in 1905 days


#12 posted 08-26-2013 03:12 PM

If your saw puts out good oil flow you may be able to get away with that alone, but an aux will not hurt. Just know it’s a bit slow going drilling the bar for the fitting. Also, become a member of the http://www.arboristsite.com/ for more tips and to ask other questions you may have.

Yes, the 30” mill would be good, it will adjust down for your bar. Milling is addictive :-)

-- http://djofurnituremaker.wordpress.com/ & https://www.facebook.com/pages/Timberwerks-Studio/126415221682

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toddbeaulieu

413 posts in 1748 days


#13 posted 09-03-2013 03:40 PM

I’ve watched a lot of videos and read a lot of material. At this point I seem to be at a crossroads.

My saw meets bare minimum at around 60cc. I could extend my bar to 27” and get the 30” setup, yielding (I believe) a 22” capacity.

But … I’ve seen (surprisingly few) videos on quarter sawing. That seems to be less demanding of the equipment, since most of the cuts are only going half way after quartering the log. In my mind, while more time consuming, this would produce the best lumber while also requiring less serious equipment. Meaning, I could use my saw as-is and get a simpler jig for vertical cutting.

This seems to be a decision and direction that I need to make. Having zero experience with this, I’d love to hear your feedback!

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