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Forum topic by Dallas posted 07-21-2013 10:19 PM 1248 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Dallas

3172 posts in 1232 days


07-21-2013 10:19 PM

I am probably going to buy an RAS SES 30Les Paul Clone guitar kit.
I see that the neck is not the type held on with screws on this unit but instead is glued on.
I’m not sure I would be a fan of this idea as I would much rather be able to change out the neck for a different one if needed.
The question I have is: Is it possible to route out a cavity in the back of the body to allow drilling holes so that the neck could be screwed or bolted in, somewhat like on a Strat or Tele?

Thanks.

Here’s a link to the one I am thinking of, but I won’t be paying anything close to the price listed.

http://www.rasdistributors.com/products-page/guitar-kits/gk-ses-30

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!


9 replies so far

View Dan Lyke's profile

Dan Lyke

1488 posts in 2870 days


#1 posted 07-22-2013 05:33 PM

When a teenage friend and I built an electric guitar recently we went with a through-neck because I was concerned about strength (metal-head teenagers crankin’ the living daylights out of steel strings can put some serious stresses on a neck). And because I think the body looks awesome with those extra stripes running through it. But we did look a bit at doing a bolt-on neck.

I’m not sure how thick the back of the body is in that kit you linked to, but it sure looks to me like you could put some inserts into the back of the neck, put a plate of some sort behind the body to give yourself a little more strength than the wood allows, and run some bolts through the plate into the neck.

For my first pass at it, I think I’d use furniture inserts on the neck, cut a plate out of 1/8” or so brass to distribute the load on the back of the body (maybe recess it in, maybe just taper and round the edges), and use a couple of flanged button head socket cap screws to hold the neck on. Minimal protrusion, lots of head size to hold things on.

And it turns out I probably shouldn’t have worried about it, ‘cause metal head teenagers also like really really light strings…

-- Dan Lyke, Petaluma California, http://www.flutterby.net/User:DanLyke

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Dan Lyke

1488 posts in 2870 days


#2 posted 07-22-2013 05:35 PM

Looking at the various examples at the Wikipedia "Bolt-on neck" article, they seem to forgo the brass plate that I was pushing for, so a relatively hard wood (helloooo eastern hard maple!) with a decent sized cap screw may be just fine.

-- Dan Lyke, Petaluma California, http://www.flutterby.net/User:DanLyke

View Loren's profile

Loren

7822 posts in 2393 days


#3 posted 07-22-2013 05:54 PM

I would glue it. That’s a hollow body. The guitar may
rotate if the neck isn’t glued in.

Some acoustics have bolt-on necks from a block inside
the guitar, but the fingerboard is glued to both the
neck and the soundboard which provides added
stability.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View sgv's profile

sgv

266 posts in 637 days


#4 posted 07-22-2013 11:04 PM

Have you try Corbin Guitars many makes many models and great customer support. I called when I was rewiring my LP and even though I did not buy from them they walked me through it.

-- Tite Lines, May the wind be at your back

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

3172 posts in 1232 days


#5 posted 07-23-2013 02:00 PM

Thanks all, I appreciate the comments. Dan, I am also concerned about the stress on the neck even though I only play antique country, Cowboy music and Western Swing with a bit of Blue Grass thrown in for balance.
I like the idea of the brass plate. It would give it an authentic look from years back.

Loren, That’s not actually a full hollow body. These are semi hollow and I believe where the neck glues up is solid.

SGV, I haven’t looked at any kit guitars other than this one, mostly I buy broken guitars and repair them if possible.
This guitar is new in the box and I offered a friend of mine $50 for it. He lost the instructions and the outer box and it has been sitting for a few years in his basement, it may have some moisture issues.

I think it might be a fun project in my off time, (What is that?), and I was thinking of doing a veneer of birdseye or curly maple on the face of it to give it a stronger look.

Does anyone have any input on the veneer idea?

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

View Nicky's profile

Nicky

636 posts in 2837 days


#6 posted 07-23-2013 04:38 PM

Take a look at this kit Looks very similar.

Less costly, maybe be better suited for experimenting.

Where do you want the veneer? I’d be concerned about the effect of the glue and veneer on the tonal quality of the sound board.

-- Nicky

View webwood's profile

webwood

619 posts in 1995 days


#7 posted 07-23-2013 04:50 PM

I remember when fender came out with a hollow body (Coronado) with a bolt on neck and everyone said a hollow body has to have a set neck (glued on) . that being said, a set neck is a bitch to get off if it breaks

-- -erik & christy-

View Loren's profile

Loren

7822 posts in 2393 days


#8 posted 07-23-2013 04:55 PM

There are alignment and assembly issues that come up
when building guitars (not solid bodies too much) that
are difficult to comprehend until you encounter and
work through them yourself on your own bench. If
the centerline of the neck isn’t established accurately,
the instrument will be off. With some guitars there
is a back angle to the neck and this can be tricky
to get right. That’s why I’m reluctant to endorse
the bolt on neck without examining the parts myself.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

3172 posts in 1232 days


#9 posted 07-23-2013 11:56 PM

Thanks Loren,
That makes sense to me, especially after repairing 50-100 broken guitars.

Nicky, That is the same model I’m looking at.

Eric, Years ago I had a Coronado and hated it. No matter what I did the thing wouldn’t stay in tune more than about 60 seconds. I’m not sure what was wrong, I changed the tuners and pegs about 3 times, but it didn’t help.
I wonder if it could have been the bolted on neck, especially since Fender had no experience with a guitar like that.
(By the way, My favorite Fender was the 1959 Fender Mustang. It had the sweetest sound and the easiest action of any of the Fenders I ever played).

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

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