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Table Saw cast iron rust removal and prevention advise needed

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Forum topic by steliart posted 274 days ago 1718 views 0 times favorited 27 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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steliart

1807 posts in 1187 days


274 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: table saw cast iron rust removal prevention ts cast iron rust removal rust prevention

Since I moved to my new shop, temperatures here are very very high and humid, I have a TS cast iron problem. It builds very easily rust on it and needs constant cleaning.
I’m tired of cleaning it every week or so and i need some advise on how to remove the rust and keep it from rusting.
I have tried many ways but not with success. Mainly use WD40 then some wax but it doesn’t look like is working, maybe the way I’m applying it is wrong?, don’t know!
Have in mind that I’m from Cyprus (European Island) and I cannot import any can sprays like the T-9 (not available here).

Any advise especially form ppl who live in similar weather conditions will be appreciated.

Thanks for the response.
Stelios

-- Stelios L.A. Stavrinides: - I am not so rich to buy cheap tools, but... necessity is the mother of inventions - http://www.steliart.com --


27 replies so far

View Drew - Rock-n H Woodshop's profile

Drew - Rock-n H Woodshop

626 posts in 1189 days


#1 posted 274 days ago

Now I’m not saying that this is the right way, but it is my way. Whenever I remove the rust I wipe mine with a furniture polish called Johnson’s paste wax. I wipe that on times three every other week or so and it usually keeps the surface rust down to a minimum if not completely gone. I live in Oklahoma which has a humid summer And keeps me on my toes at making sure my tools are clean and free of rest.

-- Drew -- "I cut it twice and it's still too short!"- Rock-n H Woodshop - Moore, OK

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taoist

109 posts in 990 days


#2 posted 274 days ago

I used to apply the Johnson’s wax to prevent rust but that had to be done so often that I tired of doing it. I then mixed up some pure turpentine and bees wax and that is what I keep on it now. Only have to apply it about twice a year.

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MrRon

2393 posts in 1742 days


#3 posted 274 days ago

I also live in a very humid climate. I use pure Carnuba wax from Brazil. It has no silicon or other additives that can cause finish problems. I apply it; let it dry; then buff it to a shine. A treatment lasts about three months. Keep the top clean and that will help prevent rust from forming. Leaving a scrap of wood on the top traps moisture.

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kdc68

1692 posts in 775 days


#4 posted 274 days ago

I have not tried it myself but have read somewhere shellac can be used to seal cast iron surfaces from rust and corrosion. Also works to protect wrought iron, brass, and copper. I would like to see others respond about their experience using shellac for this application

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

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Roger

13059 posts in 1303 days


#5 posted 274 days ago

< Johnsons Paste Wax is a favorite of mine. Once you get it cleaned, you could also use some BoeShield. http://www.theruststore.com/Boeshield-C20.aspx?gclid=CMetyP2YtbgCFWNgMgodcwUA9Q ..
It’s pretty good stuff also.

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Kentuk55@bellsouth.net

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UpstateNYdude

320 posts in 482 days


#6 posted 274 days ago

Taoist what parts do you mix for that turpentine mix? I’d be curious to try that as I use T-9 and have to apply about every month or two how often do you use your machines?

-- Nick, “Discovering the truth about ourselves is a lifetime's work, but it's worth the effort.” ― Fred Rogers, Be My Neighbor

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Straightbowed

717 posts in 797 days


#7 posted 274 days ago

SHELLAC is the best thing I ever used iit will penetrate down deep and seal, a little rough at first but after you wear it off no more rust

-- Stevo, work in tha city woodshop in the country

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Straightbowed

717 posts in 797 days


#8 posted 274 days ago

I tried ething on my jointer one day I said what tha hell I sprayed shellac on it ,hell no more rust I mean its been around a billon years and by JOE no more rust, I waxed, polished, oiled, ten times and the tables kept rusting till I put on shellac NO MORE RUST PEROID end of story but the real truth will be this winter but I plan on adding a second coat just to be safe YOU ARE VERY RIGHT >>KDC68<< IT IS THE CATS MEOW

-- Stevo, work in tha city woodshop in the country

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kdc68

1692 posts in 775 days


#9 posted 274 days ago

Straightbowed....I appreciate you sharing your experience with shellac as a rust preventative. I have been curious but apprehensive of using it myself…but now I will have to give it a try

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

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Straightbowed

717 posts in 797 days


#10 posted 274 days ago

SHELLAC for me right now is a once a year treatment but I will find out this winter how it holds up for now as much as it has rained in KY and the humidity no rust for now and after you wear it down the table is so slick and smooth miracle I tell you its a miracle

-- Stevo, work in tha city woodshop in the country

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taoist

109 posts in 990 days


#11 posted 274 days ago

UpstateNYdude…The mixture was 50-50 but I believe some of the turpentine has evaporated out but it is still soft. I put it on and then rubbed it in and the wiped off the excess. That was last summer and I have a few places starting to rust again so it needs more attention. If I make it again I will use less turpentine and will add carnuba wax to the bees wax
To be honest, I haven’t used my table saw in quite a while and all the responses about using shellac have me curious.
I have a can of Boeshield T-9 and I hate that stuff. If you put it on thick, it’s really sticky and attracts dust and dirt, if you put it on thin it doesn’t last long enough. It was made for the aerospace industry and in my opinion should have stayed there.

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UpstateNYdude

320 posts in 482 days


#12 posted 274 days ago

Stevo any particular brand spray on shellac your using I’m curious to see how well this works myself? Also what do you mean it’s a bit rough? Do I need to run over it with some fine steel wool for smoothness?

-- Nick, “Discovering the truth about ourselves is a lifetime's work, but it's worth the effort.” ― Fred Rogers, Be My Neighbor

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kdc68

1692 posts in 775 days


#13 posted 274 days ago

Upstate...great questions…I brought up the question a couple of posts ago and am curious as you are about this…I can assume the answer will be dewaxed shellac. I think Zinsser Bullseye has the dewaxed seal coat version in a rattle can

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

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Straightbowed

717 posts in 797 days


#14 posted 274 days ago

I used Zinser spray on shellac from Lowes, the yellow can, just got really tired of waxing one day and sprayed it but its just like finishing, spray on let dry smooth down with steelwool or 320 420 and there you go, its worked so far but my shop is not heated or cooled so it gets all the worst that mother nature has to offer, I think what it does is penetrates the cast iron and seals it very well

-- Stevo, work in tha city woodshop in the country

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kdc68

1692 posts in 775 days


#15 posted 274 days ago

Straightbowed..thanks again

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

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