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Forum topic by MT_Keg posted 07-15-2013 11:09 PM 1019 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MT_Keg

23 posts in 1353 days


07-15-2013 11:09 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question walnut cherry storing

I am going to pick up some lumber (Black Walnut and Wild Cherry) this weekend and I was wondering once I acquire this wood how should I store it. Could I lay it down on my garage floor? Should I stand it up? I have not had the luxury of having a bulk amount of wood at my disposal. I just want to make sure I treat it right and prevent it from warping!

Thanks for your help and advice (I really need it)!

MT


9 replies so far

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

2568 posts in 1720 days


#1 posted 07-16-2013 12:04 AM

If the wood is dry, then the storage choice is yours in terms of horizontal or vertical. I would not lay it on your garage floor because moisture can migrate up through the floor. If you put it on stickers with some air circulation you should be okay. If you stand it up, get the boards as close to plumb as possible and put some kind of restraint on it (rope or chain) so it can’t fall over.

If the wood is green, it needs to be put on a very flat base outdoors and stickered to permit air to move through it. The base should be 6-8 inches above ground level. You will also need to put something on top of the stack to keep the wood flat and to keep moisture off it. HTH

-- Art

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MT_Keg

23 posts in 1353 days


#2 posted 07-16-2013 12:15 AM

Thanks Art! The wood is dry; I can store the walnut in the vertical but have to lay the cherry down. I don’t have enough ceiling (the board is 8’-6” long). What do you mean put the wood on stickers?

Thanks,

MT

View Dlow's profile

Dlow

70 posts in 2150 days


#3 posted 07-16-2013 12:29 AM

Stickers are strips of wood laid between each piece of lumber to allow air to circulate around it.

View crank49's profile

crank49

3981 posts in 2434 days


#4 posted 07-16-2013 01:18 AM

Definitely don’t lay it on the garage floor. The concrete will wick moisture into the wood and you will promote mold growth and staining.

Stickers used for air drying green lumber and are strips of wood about 1” square and how ever long they need to be to reach across the stack of wood. But, they would be useful to keep dried lumber flat and off the floor also.

There are differing opinions about how close together they should be. some folks put them every 16”. I have put them every 32” without a problem. But pick your own spacing in that range and you should be okay. Just be sure all the stickers are aligned above each other if you have several layers of boards.

Another important point is to be sure the base you set the wood on is level. If the base is not flat and true, the lumber stacked on it will not remain flat and true.

I have an old pallet that is 8 ft long and 2 ft wide that I store wood on sometimes. Not for drying green wood, but just storage. It works well; keeps it off the concrete and flat. Gives the mice somewhere to run :^(

If you have different thicknesses it is best to put the thinnest stuff on the bottom layers so the weight of the thicker boards help to keep the thinner boards flat.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

View distrbd's profile

distrbd

2227 posts in 1909 days


#5 posted 07-16-2013 01:36 AM

MT-keg,I am in the same situation as you,I’m about to buy some kiln dried wood in the next couple of days(mainly cherry,sme ash,birch) and have never stored wood of any proportion ,in another thread that I had started,I got great info on how to store wood by NGK,here’s a cut and paste of a portion of his post:

”Whatever woods you collect for your various projects, acclimate them to your house. Heck, store them under the bed, moving them around frequently to expose all parts to air movement. Stand them vertically in a room, not to exceed about 15 degrees in the leaning angle. The idea is to acclimate the wood to it’s new environment for a month of two before construction of a project”.

-- Ken from Ontario, Canada

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1939 days


#6 posted 07-16-2013 02:02 AM

If the wood is kiln dried and you put it in the garage and stack it with stickers, you will soon have air dried wood because the garage is not climate controlled and the wood will pick up moisture from the humidity in the air. It would be better to make a base to get the wood off the concrete floor and then just flat stack the wood. This will protect the bulk of the wood from the humid air and only the exposed boards will gain significant moisture. If the wood is air dried, then you don’t have to worry about it. You can store vertical or horizontal. If the wood is air dried, I would still flat stack it without stickers because the weight of the stack will keep the boards flat.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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distrbd

2227 posts in 1909 days


#7 posted 07-16-2013 03:38 AM

WDHLT15 wrote:
“If the wood is kiln dried and you put it in the garage and stack it with stickers, you will soon have air dried wood because the garage is not climate controlled and the wood will pick up moisture from the humidity in the air”
Well now I’m officially confused,ther’s a discussion on storing kiln dried wood on woodworking talk, it sounds like if kiln dried wood is put in the garage (not climate controlled ) whether stickered or stacked, will not be the same as air dried wood in moisture content.
http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f26/storing-kiln-dried-wood-20014/.
Here’s cut and paste of some of the discussion :post #7
[QUOTE=John D in CT;162707 ]
Kiln drying will remove water that’s locked inside cells that won’t readily come out just by having the wood exposed to the air. I don’t think that any amount of air drying will ever bring wood down to 6-8% MC. By virtue of the fact (I hope it’s a fact?) that the KD wood has had a lot of the intra-cellular moisture removed (that air drying can’t), it will always have a lower MC than air-dried lumber both before and after it has been acclimatized in (say) a 60% humidity environment, since the water in the air won’t readily (if at all) find its way back into the cells. [/QUOTE]

and reply to it :(post #15)
There are three factors that affect drying rate; relative humidity, heat and air flow regardless of the drying method used. ”You are correct that air-drying, in most areas, won’t bring the wood down to 6% – 8% simply because the average relative humidity is too high. In desert areas or the mountain west, like Denver, where the RH can go as low as 1%, air-dried wood will certainly get that dry and even dryer. Most areas, however, will see only 12% MC from air drying.

Wood cells contain free water and bound water. The free water is held within the cellular cavities and is the first to go when drying wood. When all the free water is gone and only the bound water (water that is chemically attached to the cell wall) is left, that’s known as the fiber saturation point. Unless submerged, the wood can never re-gain moisture above the FSP because it’s already saturated. The average FSP is around 28% MC.

Moisture in wood moves from the area of highest MC to the area of lowest MC. Heat facilitates that movement and air-flow removes it once it reaches the exterior of the wood.

Once wood is dried to a certain MC, say 8% and then exposed to a 10% EMC, it may only regain moisture to 9% MC. It’s called a hysteresis effect.”**

-- Ken from Ontario, Canada

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WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1939 days


#8 posted 07-16-2013 11:51 AM

”it sounds like if kiln dried wood is put in the garage (not climate controlled ) whether stickered or stacked, will not be the same as air dried wood in moisture content.”

Maybe not exactly the same, but it will get close. In Georgia right now, the Equilibrium Moisture Content of air dried wood is about 15% (lots of rain and high humidity) for wood stacked in a shed. If your kiln dried wood equalized to only 13% in a non-climate controlled environment instead of 15%, that is still enough moisture gain to impact how the wood will behave.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

View distrbd's profile

distrbd

2227 posts in 1909 days


#9 posted 07-16-2013 12:01 PM

Thank you Wood-mizer LT15,I,m just trying to make sense of it all.

-- Ken from Ontario, Canada

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