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Rubbermaid Twin Tracks for Lumber Storage

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Forum topic by ADHDan posted 07-15-2013 02:56 PM 1717 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ADHDan

440 posts in 759 days


07-15-2013 02:56 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

Has anyone used this line of product for lumber storage?

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Rubbermaid-70-in-Twin-Track-Upright-FG4B8900WHT/100047070

According to the manufacturer specs, the 24” shelves can hold up to 275 lbs, and the 18” shelves can hold up to 450 lbs. I’m planning on running about 7’ of track with five sets of shelves – three 24” shelves down lower, and two 18” shelves up top.

Because the shelves swing somewhat loose in the track, I was going to cut some 1/8” hardboard to the shelf size to provide structural rigidity without adding the extra wait (or cost) of the Rubbermaid shelves. This also will help keep lumber from sliding around. Also, I’m installing through two layers of drywall directly into studs, using 5.5” spax screws towards the top of the track and 5” drywall screws at the lower end (where the load is lighter).

Can I get by with two tracks spaced 36” or 48” apart, or should I run a third track? Also, anyone generally have views on this shelf system? Thanks!

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.


15 replies so far

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PurpLev

8476 posts in 2299 days


#1 posted 07-15-2013 02:59 PM

thats what I use… so far it’s been holding up quite a lot for the past several years on those 24” brackets (I think I have 3 verticals with brackets on them to spread the weight)

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

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Murdock

107 posts in 1134 days


#2 posted 07-15-2013 03:19 PM

I use another brand but same basic system, lots of wood up there right now and been holding strong for over a year. I think I have my brackets spaced aprox every 36” they aren’t all the same because my uprights hang from a rod across the top of the wall rather than individually being screwed into studs, the screws in the uprights are more for keeping them from swaying than actual support. The rod across the top is scrwed into the studs with spax scerws.

I don’t actually use any “shelves” I just have boards on the bottom that reach all the way across (2×4s, 1×12, etc) The idea of putting something in there to create lateral stability is a good one though, hasn’t been an issue for me, but was something I was concerned about.

-- "Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new." - Albert Einstein

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ADHDan

440 posts in 759 days


#3 posted 07-15-2013 03:19 PM

To keep costs down, I was thinking of running two tracks spaced 4’ apart, and using these cheap brackets to provide additional support in the intervening studs: http://www.homedepot.com/p/Everbilt-12-in-x-14-in-White-Shelf-Bracket-15255/202034281.

I can always pick up more tracks and brackets if it seems flimsy, but given load limits I’m thinking that two of the heavy-duty tracks supported at each shelf with the cheaper brackets probably should hold up. The only disadvantage is that the smaller support brackets aren’t adjustable, but honestly once this thing is in place and loaded up the only time I’ll be adjusting shelves is if I do a major overhaul – in which case I probably will pick up another set of the Rubbermaids.

Thanks for the replies. Based on your experiences, I think this plan should work – but if I need to spend another $50 to get a third set of Rubbermaid tracks and shelf supports, so be it. I do think that the hardboard will help prevent rocking and racking, especially since it will be screwed into both the Rubberbaid brackets and the permanently-fixed cheaper brackets.

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.

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firefighterontheside

4243 posts in 507 days


#4 posted 07-15-2013 03:20 PM

I have a comparable system that I got from Menards. I only got the smaller brackets. I know it says so much weight, but I didn’t like the idea of the longer brackets sticking way out holding all that weight right above my head. I would be worried about those tracks mounted on drywall. I would think the tracks might start to dig into the drywall. If they are like mine, which they appear to be from the picture. I too have 3 vertical tracks a little less than 4 feet in between so that I can store 8’ boards.

-- Bill M. I love my job as a firefighter, but nothing gives me the satisfaction of running my hand over a project that I have built and just finished sanding.

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ADHDan

440 posts in 759 days


#5 posted 07-15-2013 03:24 PM

That’s a good call on digging into the drywall (even though they’ll be stud-mounted). I think I can get around that by cutting little blocks of wood to fit into the tracks themselves, where they will be screwed to the wall. That way, the screw won’t be able to dig the track into the drywall; the wood blocks will act as a hard separator.

Also, I don’t have space in my shop to store much more than 6’ boards, and most of my stock is 4’. I think anything longer than 6’ will get stored in joist-mounted overhead racks in the garage.

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.

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pintodeluxe

3355 posts in 1464 days


#6 posted 07-15-2013 03:29 PM

I have these in my closet, but they are for holding up bath towels – not lumber.

I personally would not trust these to support lumber. They attach with pretty small / standard screws.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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ADHDan

440 posts in 759 days


#7 posted 07-15-2013 03:35 PM

I’m not using the original screws, I’m using heavy-duty Spax and long drywall screws to mount the standards to the studs.

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.

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firefighterontheside

4243 posts in 507 days


#8 posted 07-15-2013 03:38 PM

I used 5/16 lag screws. Some of them go into the 6 by 6 timbers of my garage and the rest into 2 by 4 studs.

-- Bill M. I love my job as a firefighter, but nothing gives me the satisfaction of running my hand over a project that I have built and just finished sanding.

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bannerpond1

233 posts in 549 days


#9 posted 07-15-2013 03:41 PM

Dan, I use them exclusively on 32-inch spans, every other stud, unless there’s not a stud there to use. I have had no problems in any way. Not sure of the maker of mine, but I just buy whatever Lowe’s has and they’ve always been fine. I, too, put an 8-ft board on the bottom. I’ve got a lot of weight on several sets of these and never had a problem, even with some 20-inch ponderosa pine. I pre-drill the holes in the studs and use the biggest screw that will go through the track.

-- --Dale Page

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ADHDan

440 posts in 759 days


#10 posted 07-16-2013 01:33 PM

All good to know. I think I’ve got a good setup – three 70” tracks spanning three studs, with seven 18.5” shelf supports per track connected with 1/4” plywood underlayment for makeshift shelves. This should add some structural rigidity, and also help spread the weight around – since most of my lumberis is roughly 4’-5’, without some sort of shelf there would be a disproportionate amount of weight on the center track.

I can’t wait to get my giant pile of stock off the floor of my shop and the wall of my garage.

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.

View Matt Przybylski's profile

Matt Przybylski

448 posts in 1028 days


#11 posted 07-16-2013 01:54 PM

I’ve got two sets of these: http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=29963&site=ROCKLER

They regularly go on sale for $30 which is what I got them for (mostly in store though so I’d check your local rocker if you have one around). If you factor in the uprights and brackets for the system you’re describing you’ll be over the cost of these and these were made specifically for lumber storage. I’ve got a TON of lumber I just bought on them now and they’re holding up great. Just some food for thought.

-- Matt, Illinois, http://www.reintroducing.com

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ADHDan

440 posts in 759 days


#12 posted 07-16-2013 02:30 PM

Matt – I looked extensively at that and another Rockler rack. Ultimately, I decided on the Rubbermaid racks because they seem to have a higher weight limit and are more customizable – in terms of track placement, track length, and shelf support length. For example, 18.5” is perfect for my storage needs, and (I think) six inches longer than the Portamate shelves. But, my far-right track runs behind a cabinet mounted on the adjacent wall, so I can’t fit 18.5” shelf supports back there – but I can fit 9” supports, which Rubbermaid offers.

I haven’t done more than rough math, but I think that the per-foot cost of storage is pretty close as between the Portomate and the Rubbermaid systems (after using some Home Depot coupons). The Rubbermaid system probably is a little more expensive, but the shelves have a much higher weight rating and I think it’s a lot more flexible.

That said, I’m just finishing the installation and lumber setup tonight, so I’ll report back on how satisfied I am with the final product.

Edit – I’ve also never seen those on sale for $30, but I will say that is a hell of a deal. If I had time to wait/find a sale, I would’ve been tempted to go with the Portomate system.

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.

View Matt Przybylski's profile

Matt Przybylski

448 posts in 1028 days


#13 posted 07-16-2013 10:53 PM

Absolutely, those are all fair and genuine points. I fell on the $30 deal (have seen it twice now at my local rockler) and couldn’t pass it up. I even went back to buy another after it went back up in price, informed them that I just bought one for $30 and they gave it to me for $30 anyway.

-- Matt, Illinois, http://www.reintroducing.com

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ADHDan

440 posts in 759 days


#14 posted 07-17-2013 02:28 PM

Well, I got the racks installed last night and the verdict is: I love them. I’ve got three tracks, mounted every other stud, with seven shelves spaced evenly except at the bottom, where I allowed more space and plan to put the heaviest loads. I’m going to put support blocks under the bottom shelf to help support/distribute weight.

In retrospect, I wish I had used a sturdier material than underlayment for the shelf bottoms, but that’s a minor gripe. Because of the shelf design and the thickness of the underlayment, I couldn’t find screw sizes to screw into (but not through) the shelves from the bottom, so for now I screwed the shelves in from the top and used little blocks of pine to cover the screw points, for safety. Eventually I’m sure I can find a more elegant solution.

Here are the pictures. My apologies for the poor lighting and perspective; my shop-in-progress is still quite crowded, so I didn’t really have a good vantage point. Thanks everyone for the suggestions and discussion in the thread, it was very useful.

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.

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Marcus

1046 posts in 670 days


#15 posted 07-17-2013 03:23 PM

I’ve used almost the same setup (home depot brackets, every other stud) for about the last year. No problems with it other than Im running out of room thanks to my wood hoarding issues!

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